Catalog

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do I get my PIN?
  2. How do I search MARC fields?
  3. How do I limit a search to the title proper (exclude notes fields)?
  4. How do I do a title browse?
  5. How do I search for journals?
  6. What does undetermined wait time mean?
  7. What is an XX call number?
  8. How are MARC fields indexed in the catalog?
  9. How are Boolean operators processed by the catalog?
  10. How do I print a results list?
  11. How do I do an advanced search and why would I?
  12. How do I search for music using uniform titles?
  13. How do the music quick searches work and why should I use them?
  14. How do I limit my searches by item type?
  15. How do I browse call numbers?
  16. When do I use keyword, exact, and browse for item search and display?
  17. How are search results sorted?
  18. How do I search for reserves by instructor?

How do I get my PIN?

You can get your library PIN number from the Learning Commons desk at the front of the library. Your library PIN number is a 4-digit number randomly assigned to each user by the library’s system; it is unrelated to any other Loyola PIN or password you may have. You may change your assigned PIN in the catalog. To do this, you will need your assigned PIN and you CWID or your library barcode.. Go into the full catalog. In the grey bar above the search box, select 'My Account', and then 'Change My PIN'. Enter your CWID or library barcode, your old PIN, and your new PIN, and click on 'Change PIN'.

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How do I search MARC fields?

Searching a specific MARC field is particularly useful when you want to find an item by its ISBN, ISSN, or by a music publisher’s number. These corresponding Marc fields for these are:

  • ISBN = 020
  • ISSN (periodical number) = 022
  • Music publisher’s number = 028

To limit a search to a specific MARC field, do a words or phrase keyword search and add the MARC field number in curly brackets to the end of the search string. The example below shows how to limit a search to the ISBN number.

0316160172 {020}

How do I limit a search to the title proper (exclude notes fields)?

To limit a search to the title proper in the web catalog, you can add the MARC field tag in curly brackets to the search. For example if you want to search for the words “human trafficking” in the title proper, do a general (words or phrase) keyword search and add the field tag {245}.

human trafficking {245}

Without specifying the MARC field, a title keyword search will return results with the words “human trafficking” in the fields including 130, 245, 246, 440, 505, 700t, 730 and 740. A general keyword (words or phrase) search will search all indexed fields.

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How do I do a title browse?

To browse an alphabetical list of titles, choose “browse” as the search type and select “title” from the dropdown list. Omit any initial articles from the title including those in foreign languages. For example, to do a title browse for the film El Orfanato, enter “orfanato” as the search string. To do a title browse for this same film by its English title (The Orphanage), enter “orphanage” as the search string.

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How do I search for journals?

Journals are best searched in the Journal Finder. Because the Journal Finder contains both print and electronic holdings, it is useful to start your search in that system rather than the catalog. Once you have located the journal title in the Journal Finder, you can follow the links to either the electronic copy or you can verify the complete print holdings by following the link to the library catalog. One caveat, some older regional or local serials will not be listed in the Journal Finder because they do not have a standard ISSN number. For these titles only, you will need to search the catalog

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What does undetermined wait time mean?

Undetermined wait time means that an item is overdue. You may place a hold on the item so that you are notified when the item is returned. To do this, you will need your library barcode or CWID, and your library PIN. If an item is checked out, there is an option in the detailed record of the item to place a hold. It is located in the box on the left, under the "Mark" button. Please note that placing a hold does not recall the item.

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What is an XX call number?

When materials are initially ordered, the catalog supplies a call number that starts with XX. Materials with this call number are not yet ready for circulation and can take four to six weeks to arrive. Once the material is received the XX call number is replaced by a proper call number. Materials with proper call numbers may be listed as in process, meaning they have been received and are in the building, but they are not yet ready for circulation. If you would like to use a material that has a status of “in process”, please contact the library to inquire about the material. In some cases we may be able to rush process the material so that you can pick it up the same or next day. In any case we can place a hold on the material for you and alert you when it is ready for pickup. You can also use the "Place Hold" link in the catalog to place a hold on an in process material yourself. With the exception of holidays and staff absences, these holds will typically be checked on a daily basis (Monday-Friday).

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How are MARC fields indexed in the catalog?

Some fields (any note field in the 5xx range, and numeric fields like isbn and issn, or publisher’s numbers) are indexed only as keywords. They can only be searched by using a “word or phrase” keyword search. Some fields are designated as both keyword and as a specific designation such as author (100, 110, 700), title (245, 246), or subject (600, 610, 650). Some fields are indexed as keyword and more than one specific designation. 505, the contents note field, and 710, added author (and sometimes author/title), are indexed both as author and title because they contain both types of information. Additionally, some fields are designated for particular browse indices (author, title, or subject). If you do a keyword “word or phrase” search and retrieve nothing, the alphabetical list retrieved is a subject browse.

How are Boolean operators processed by the catalog?

The default operator for the catalog, if you do not put an AND in your search, is SAME, meaning the catalog will search for your words only in the same field. So, if you are searching words from various fields (author, title, subject) in the same search, you must use the AND operator between your search terms. You can also use OR to combine synonyms and NOT to exclude terms in a search. In fact, if the word NOT is a word in the title, you must use single quotes around it so it will not be recognized as the Boolean operator. iLink also has the possibility of an unusual operator, XOR. XOR between terms means that you want either term but not both terms in your results, so if you searched for piano AND clarinet XOR viola, you might retrieve works for piano and clarinet or piano and viola but not all three. Or, you could search for frogs and fish, but not items about both frogs and fish. Strange, but true.

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How do I print a results list?

At the left of each catalog record there are two buttons: “Details” and “Mark.” For each item that you want on the list, click on “Mark” (when you do this, the button changes to “Unmark.” You can click it again if you later decide you don’t want the item on your list). If you choose, you can run another catalog search and continue to mark items. When you are finished, click “Print/ Email Marked,” located with the red buttons above the catalog records (This may not work if you have a pop-up blocker enabled). If there are items on the list that you don’t want, you can remove them by checking the box next to their records and clicking “Removed Checked Titles” in the left-hand menu. You can create a printer-friendly list by clicking the box marked ‘Printer Friendly Version.’ This creates a text file that you can either print or save onto your computer or flash drive. You can also email the list, either to yourself or someone else, by entering the appropriate email addresses in the email box and clicking “Email.” You can send the list to multiple addresses by inserting a comma between them.

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How do I do an advanced search and why would I?

Advanced searching allows you to designate the terms you are searching as author, title, subject, etc. You can search Walker as author and Color Purple as title rather than just searching for Walker and Color Purple as generic keywords. You can also apply limiters in advanced searching, such as the type of item (book, score, etc.) or the location (stacks, reference, etc.). If the limiters are confusing to you, trying using the pre-set Quick Searches, where the limiters are already applied for you.

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How do I search for music using uniform titles?

Musical works generally have a uniform title, which just means that there is a standard title by which that work is known that allows you to search for it under that title no matter what the publisher has called it. The score of a work may have been published in Germany or Italy and have a German or Italian title page, but it’s still the same score or recording. It’s just a matter of finding it in the catalog. These titles are located in the 240 MARC field or the 710 $t. There are two types of uniform titles. For works with a name, such as Mozart’s opera Marriage of Figaro, or Honegger’s oratorio King David, the uniform title will be the original published title of the work in the original language (Marriage of Figaro = Nozze di Figaro and King David = Roi David). For works with generic names such as symphony, quartet, trio, etc., the uniform title is constructed according to cataloging rules. The first element is the type of work and is usually plural (depending on whether the composer wrote more than one of this type of work). The second element will be the instrumentation, if it’s not obvious from the first element (e.g., a symphony is assumed to be orchestra), and the last is an identifying number (either an opus number or one identified by a standard thematic index) or key or both. So the uniform title for Beethoven’s 3rd symphony is Symphonies, no. 3, op. 55, E . In general, when searching for musical works with generic titles, your best bet is to search using the plural term (symphonies, quartets, quintets, etc.) as both the uniform title and subject headings will use the plural.

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How do the music quick searches work and why should I use them?

The main reason why you might want to use a quick search to search for music is to limit by type of item. You might be searching just for a recording or just a score and you may not want to sort through all of the retrieved results for the right thing. Our catalog includes cataloging records for the Naxos Classical Music Library recordings and those records can make results a little overwhelming. We have quick searches set up to pre-limit your search to online audio, compact discs, vinyl records, scores, or scores and recordings together. If you’re searching for a book about a composer, you should probably use the quick search for books and search by subject with the composer’s name so you don’t retrieve hundreds of scores and recordings in addition to the book you are looking for.

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How do I limit my searches by item type?

In the "Catalog quick searches" section of the library home page, there is a dropdown menu. It defaults to "All materials" but you can use it to limit your search by item type. If you are in the full catalog, you may select "Quick searches" from the grey bar located above the search box. From there, you can select the item type that you are searching for.

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How do I browse call numbers?

On the main catalog page, click on Advanced Search (a link right under the search box) then Click on Browse Call_Number in the box next to the Advanced Search screen. That search defaults to a search by Library of Congress call numbers (used for books and scores). To browse call numbers for DVDs, VHS, compact discs, or other types of library materials that have alphanumeric call numbers, change the shelving scheme pull-down to Alpha-numeric class scheme.

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When do I use keyword, exact, and browse for item search and display?

Exact should only be used for numeric searches such as item id (barcode) or isbn. Call number searches default to browse automatically. Don’t forget to change the class scheme if you are browsing for a non-LC call number (DVD, CD, VHS, or XX call numbers). The class scheme for media items is ALPHANUM and the class scheme for XX call numbers is AUTO. If you are searching for a specific title or trying to search by just an author’s name (especially where someone is unsure of spelling) or if you are unsure about the correct Library of Congress subject heading, try searching browse title, author, or subject. If you are searching multiple words together, use keyword with AND between the terms.

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How are search results sorted?

The catalog defaults to a reverse publication year sort, that is, the items published most recently are at the top of the list and the oldest at the bottom. This can be confusing for current magazine or journal titles (such as Time) that have been published for many years and therefore fall to the end of a list of results. That said, the reverse publication year sort is only strictly true right after we have run indexing of the catalog, which we do only once or twice a year. After that, the sort reverts to “last in, first up” which means that the last things loaded into the catalog are the first retrieved in a search. Unfortunately, that means that on-order and in process items appear at the top of a results list and that can be confusing.

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How do I search for reserves by instructor?

From the library’s home page, go to the full catalog. Click on "Reserves", which is located in the grey bar above the search box. Click on "Search physical reserves". Enter in the professor’s name and click "Lookup items on reserve by instructor". Click on the name of the professor. Click on your class.

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