Posts Tagged ‘Tourism’

History of Mass Tourism collection

Special Collections & Archives is very excited to announce that Adam Matthew Digital recently released The History of Mass Tourism, a collection of primary sources from around the world. The digital collection includes two from Special Collections & Archives: the Anthony J. Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary Collection and the Anthony J. Stanonis Collection of New Orleans tourism.

From their website:

“This resource presents a multi-national journey through well-known, little-known and far-flung destinations unlocked for the average traveller between 1850 and the 1980s. Guidebooks and brochures, periodicals, travel agency correspondence, photographs and personal travel journals provide unique insight into the expansion, accessibility and affordability of tourism for the masses and the evolution of some of the most successful travel agencies in the world.”

Partnering with Adam Matthew enabled nearly the entirety of both Stanonis collections to be digitized in full, and we are in very good company along with:

  • Blackpool Central Library Local History Centre
  • Brooklyn Historical Society
  • California Historical Society
  • The Camping and Caravanning Club Archive
  • John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, Duke University
  • George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
  • Massachusetts Historical Society
  • Michigan State University Libraries
  • New Hampshire Historical Society
  • The Newberry Library
  • The New York Academy of Medicine Library
  • Thomas Cook Archives
  • The National Archives, UK
  • University of Westminster Archive

The site requires a subscription, but the Monroe Library has trial access through July 8. Please visit the front desk to be logged in.

Image from The Bachelor in New Orleans, included in The History of Mass Tourism

We are thrilled that so many people will be able to use these collections digitally. Thank you to Adam Matthew for including us in this resource.

Collection Spotlight: Anthony J. Stanonis Collection

Anthony J. Stanonis received a B.A. in history from Loyola University New Orleans in 1997, then an M.A. in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2003, both in history, from Vanderbilt University. Stanonis’s research interests have centered on the cultural and economic implications of urban tourism. While researching the history of tourism in New Orleans for his dissertation, he acquired an assortment of artifacts generated by that city’s tourist industry. His research resulted in the publication of his book, Creating the Big Easy: New Orleans and the Emergence of Modern Tourism, 1918-1945, published in 2006 by the University of Georgia Press.

This collection comprises Stanonis’s personal acquisitions of materials pertaining to the New Orleans tourist industry. It includes guides, maps, brochures, books, and other literature put out by public and private groups and businesses, spanning roughly from 1902 to 1960.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Be a Bachelor (or Bacheloress) in New Orleans

#howtotuesday: Be a Bachelor (or Bacheloress) in New Orleans

With the arrival of summer holidays, pleasure-seekers descend upon New Orleans in full force. Whether you are an “unattached gentlemen or lady of spirit visiting” or perhaps a long-time “resident in the Paris of America,” The Bachelor in New Orleans provides a candid guide to the Crescent City. The charming handbook, printed in 1942 and illustrated with vibrant block prints throughout, launches directly into heart of the matter with “Chapter 1: Of Drink and the Devil,” a guide to New Orleans’ most potent beverages and notable bars (many of which are still in operation today).

Additional chapters provide the Bachelor with instruction on fine dining (“be kind to your food, and it will love you…so will the chef”), curing loneliness, surviving Mardi Gras, and my personal favorite, how not to be a tourist.

According to The Bachelor in New Orleans, in order to avoid the horror of being mistaken as a tourist, one should keep the following don’ts in mind:

  • Never, never kick garbage cans! This is a cardinal sin for Bachelors in New Orleans.
  • Never stand and stare at any happening, no matter how rare, outrageous, unseemly, or unconventional it may strike you. If an unusual happening is pleasant or gay, a New Orleans Bachelor unobtrusively takes part in it; if it is unpleasant, the Bachelor in New Orleans unobtrusively takes part in something else.
  • Never raise your voice above Martha Raye’s level. People across the river and in adjoining parishes have to sleep. In the French Quarter, of course, no one could sleep if a sudden quiet fell in the streets. Bed-occupiers would sit bolt upright, in a cold sweat!
  • Never ask an interesting looking individual if he is an artist. He might be one, in which case he will resent you. And if he is not, he may cause you some embarrassment.
  • Do not attempt to direct traffic or dance bands while over-intoxicated. You will not do your best job if you have had one too many, and a most remarkable and unpleasant snarl may result.

And finally,

  • If you are a male Bachelor, never make what could be considered the first pass at any woman you have not known all your life. If she is interested, or can be satisfactorily interested, she will make the first pass—and if you are a Bachelor in New Orleans, you will know when it happens. This rule does not apply to female Bachelors in New Orleans: being females, they have their own rules about these matters and do what they’re going to do anyway.

At any rate, don’t be a tourist.

For further tips on thriving in 1940’s New Orleans, visit the Special Collections & Archives to peruse The Bachelor in New Orleans in full.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.