Posts Tagged ‘specialcollections’

Fun with protective enclosures!

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This week, I have enjoyed making a number of custom-fitting enclosures for books related to Louisiana history in Special Collections and Archives. Today I created two identical 4-flap enclosures for both volumes of Charles Gayarré’s La Louisiane. The two books lack sturdy covers, and without proper protection the pages are at risk of deterioration on the shelf. I was able to streamline my measuring process since the books were the same size (woohoo!) I use a strip of paper to measure the thickness, height and width of the book(s), which prevents needing to use the actual books as measuring devices. Using simple tools such as an x-acto knife, a straight-edge, a bonefolder, scissors, double-sided tape, and my measuring strip, I cut one vertical component and one horizontal component out of heavy archival folder-stock. Cutting 2 components allows me to fold with the grain-direction of the folder stock, and this gives me clean, crisp folds that stay flat. I then adhere both components together in the center with archival double-sided tape. I like to secure these enclosures by cutting a tab that fits into a slit on the cover – this prevents my from needing any strings or buttons, which can sometimes damage other books on the shelf (and saves materials!)

Stay tuned for future descriptions and tutorials as we await new and exciting preservation/conservation supplies here in Special Collections and Archives! Yay box-making!

Found in the Archives: Estrays

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Today we take a glance at a thin volume of poetry. Estrays was first published in 1918 and then again edited and in hardcover in 1920. It is populated with poetry composed by the poets: Thomas Kennedy, George Steele SeymourVincent Starrett, and Basil Thompson.

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Below is a selection of a poem that that is both representative of the collections’ title and themes (estray : stray); The Quest, by Thomas Kennedy.

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You can browse either edition Monday – Friday from 9:00-4:30  in Booth-Bricker Reading Room inside the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Special Collections: James Joyce

Today marks the 134 birthday of James Joyce, and on the 22nd it will be the 94th anniversary of the first full publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses, by publisher and famous bookstore owner Sylvia Beach.

First published in installments by The Little Review starting in March of 1918, the book takes place over the course of one day, June 16, 1920. This day is now celebrated as Bloomsday, named after the protagonist of the book, Leopold Bloom.

Reading the book is a goal for many though it is a book few complete. To quote the New York Times review by Dr. Joseph Collins, “Not ten men or women out of a hundred can read Ulysses through [...] I am probably the only person, aside from the author, that has ever read it twice from beginning to end.” It does however have a benefit for those who finish it, as Collins purports, “I have learned more psychology and psychiatry from it than I did in ten years at the Neurological Institute.”

In celebration of James Joyce’s birthday and to illustrate our love of difficult but rewarding books, we offer you a preview of some of our more unique tiles by and about Joyce from our collections.

James Joyce, a critical introduction, by Harry Levin.

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An exagmination of James Joyce; analyses of the “Work in progress”, by Samuel Beckett, Marcel Brion, Frank Budgen and others…

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Pomes penyeach / by James Joyce.

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Recollections of James Joyce / by his brother Stanislaus Joyce ; translated from the Italian by Ellsworth Mason.

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Yes… these titles are available for research in the Special Collections & Archives Booth-Bricker Reading Room Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 4:30 PM.