Posts Tagged ‘Special Collections & Archives’

A Spooky Week in Special Collections

Insects

Get into the Halloween spirit with this week’s list of links from the Special Collections & Archives Tumblr:

Marbled Monday Page Fright: Endpapers from All Souls’ Night by John Kelly.

CREEPY CRAWLERS!: A delightful infestation of specimen from Le Règne animal… published between 1836-49 and authored by George Cuvier, often referred to as “the father of paleontology.”

#Bookguts: Enjoy a few frightening GIFs from Encyclopédie moderne, Eustache-Marie Courtin, 1824.

New Exhibit! Janet Mary Riley: A Voice for Social Justice in Louisiana

Come see our NEW exhibit on Loyola law professor, feminist, and social reformer Janet Mary Riley’s life and career.

The exhibit will be up through Spring of 2018 as part of the citywide NOLA4Women a citywide “series of more than 45 exhibits, performances, lectures, blogs and a new app [that] will shine a spotlight on the prominent role women played in creating the cultural, physical and social infrastructure of New Orleans.”

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The exhibit is located in the Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room.

Stay tuned for more updates and events throughout the year!

Jean Cocteau illustrations

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We’re really enjoying Jean Cocteau’s color lithograph illustrations from a pair of books that recently migrated to Special Collections & Archives from our public stacks: Jean Cocteau: Théâtre illustré par l’auteur, books I and II,1957.

You can view these books in their entirety in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of Monroe Library at Loyola University!

Extract from the Reconstructed Constitution of the State of Louisiana

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“Extract from the Reconstructed Constitution of the State of Louisiana,” 1868, a slightly tattered treasure from our Collection of New Orleans Miscellany .

The seated man in the center of this document is Oscar Dunn, the first black lieutenant governor of the U.S. Senate elected in 1868. In the late 1800s, a monument in Dunn’s honor was slated to be erected in New Orleans, yet after his untimely and mysterious death, the monument was never created. You can listen to this man’s inspiring, yet tragic, story on this episode of “TriPod: New Orleans at 300.

#Feathursday !

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This week’s #feathursday post is brought to you by Diderot’s Encyclopédie.

We at Special Collections & Archives hope you enjoy the plumage and the remainder of your week!

Collection Highlight: M. Aguilar sets

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Occasionally I come across a few rare gems in our public stacks that I carefully rescue to be catalogued in Special Collections. Last week, I gathered many multi-volume sets in series of Spanish theater and poetry published by M. Aguilar in the 1940s-50s. What caught my eye was the hint of color on the top edge of one of the books, and when I pulled it from the shelf I gasped at the bright, intricate stencil that looks to have been airbrushed along the textblock’s head, tail and fore-edge. Some have faded over time along the head, but the edges that have not been exposed to light in some time are as bright as ever. The books vary in size and are all cased in soft leather dyed in various colors. Many feature whimsically illustrated end-sheets as you open the cover, and each has a sepia toned portrait of the author facing the book’s title page. A classy and surprising series indeed! You can now access these books in the Reading Room of SC&A, on the third floor of Monroe Library.

Clamshell Boxmaking

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Checkout our Special Collections & Archives Tumblr post to view a brief photo documentary of the clamshell box constructed for a large oversized leather volume, Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, etc. Hooray for box-making and book preservation!

Weather in New Orleans

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If you live in New Orleans, you know that the weather can change drastically day to day, especially in the winter. I’ve compiled a few photos from our Loyola University Photographs collection to illustrate the weather one might experience in a single week in January. Happy Monday, everyone! Stay warm! (or dry, or cool, depending..)

New Orleans Directory ads, 1852

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Here’s a little holiday treat for lovers of New Orleans history and typography. I’ve been making enclosures to preserve our collection of New Orleans Directories, and have enjoyed that these books are all interspersed with type-set ads of many colors. You can glean much about the culture of the time period from these ads. (i.e. the note about a hospital for slaves at the bottom the first ad depicted.) This particular book, Cohen’s New Orleans and Lafayette Directory, 1852, was printed in the office of the Delta Daily newspaper. As you can see, letterpress printers in the nineteenth century would often show off the type in their shops by using every single typeface available when setting ads and title pages. Fun fact: the engraved image facing the title page depicts the first mayor of New Orleans, A.D. Crossman (1846-1854).

Collection Spotlight: Gulf Restoration Network Archives

Interested in learning more about Louisiana’s waterways and their environmental history? The Gulf Restoration Network Archives are a great place to conduct such research. The Gulf Restoration Network was formed in 1994 by environmental groups, conservationists and activists in New Orleans dedicated to the study of ecological sustainability along the Gulf of Mexico.  From the collection finding aid: (The Gulf Restoration Network) has focused on three areas of work: fostering sustainable management of fisheries; stopping polluted run-off that results in the Gulfs Dead Zone; and opposing Corps of Engineers policies that destroy wetlands. It reports on its work in the quarterly newspaper GRN NEWS, which includes the insert Fish Tales. The collection is arranged alphabetically by subject and dates roughly between 1995 and 2001. It consists mainly of correspondence, grants and proposals, and sign-ons and comments. It also contains considerable materials related to the Dead Zone, fisheries and Corps of Engineers projects.

Featured below is one of many spiral-bound reports affiliated with the GRN archives. This particular report is dated from September 1973 and addresses the economic and environmental impacts of industry along Louisiana’s waterways.
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Learn more about this collection in the SCA Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of Monroe Library!