Posts Tagged ‘Special Collections’

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

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The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

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The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

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These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

American Chocolate Week: Walter Baker and Co.

Seeing as it is American Chocolate Week, we here at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives are offering a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones:

Collections Spotlight: Louisiana Women Writers Symposium Collection

In celebration of International Women’s Day, we are shining the spotlight on our Louisiana Women Writers Symposium Collection.

This collection primarily consists of correspondence and photographs from the Louisiana Women Writers Symposium that was held on September 19-20, 1986 at Loyola University New Orleans.

The symposium was funded by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and co-sponsored by Loyola University and the Women’s Studies Consortium of Louisiana. It was co-directed by Dorothy H. Brown and Barbara C. Ewell, who were faculty members of the English department of City College at Loyola University at the time.

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The symposium was held over a day and a half and featured sixteen scholars and moderators with a reading by writer Ellen Gilchrist.

 

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Ellen Gilchrist, Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives

 

Selected presentations from the conference were published with additional essays first in 1988 in New Orleans Review: Special Issue on Louisiana Women Writers, 15:1 (Spring 1988) and Louisiana State University Press in 1992 as a book entitled Louisiana Women Writers: New Essays and a Comprehensive Bibliography.

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The prologue to written for the dedicated issue of the New Orleans Review, does an amazing job at summarizing the significance of the conference, and the scholarship  and authorship presented there, “… the Consortium sought to dramatize through the symposium a critical otherness — another perspective on our past and present that purposely includes female, regional, black, ethnic, working-class, and other excluded minority points of view. It is the reinstatement of those “other” perspectives, which are essential to our cultural self-definitions, that women’s studies and the Consortium are committed.”

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Here is a little Library Lagniappe for you, a discussion on women writers from 1972 (the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement) between Helen Vendler, Nora Ephron, Elizabeth Janeway, and poet Carolyn Kizer, from 1972, hosted in New York City at the 92nd Street Y, Women Writers: Has Anything Changed?


Creole Voices

Continuing our celebration of Black History Month, the following pair of books are just a few of the many items related to the history of Louisiana’s people of color in Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives.

Creole voices; poems in French by free men of color (in French, Les Cenelles), was published in 1845 by Armand Lanusse, a free man of color living in New Orleans. The poetry collection was a landmark publication. Lanusse worked most of his career as a teacher at the L’Institution Catholique des Orphelins Indigents. An original edition of Les Cenelles is digitized and available online in the Louisiana Digital Library thanks to the Historic New Orleans Collection.

Nearly 100 years later, Lanusse’s work was highlighted by Charles Barthelemy Roussève, who was born to an accomplished black Creole family in 1902. After studies at Xavier Preparatory School and Straight College, Roussève  completed his master’s degree in history from Xavier University of New Orleans where his thesis, The Negro in Louisiana; aspects of his history and his literature, became the first book-length publication issued by Xavier University Press. The Negro in Louisiana drew attention to Lanusse’s little known Les Cenelles.

Roussève went on to work as an educator in New Orleans for 45 years as both a teacher and a principal and also published poetry, prose, and translations. Roussève’s papers are held at the Amistad Research Center.

Both of these books and many more like them are available for research in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

Collection Spotlight: Norman Treigle Papers

In memoriam of the anniversary of Norman Treigle’s death on February 16th, 1975 we are spotlighting our Norman Treigle Papers collection.

Adanelle Wilfred (Norman) Treigle was born in New Orleans on March 6, 1927, the youngest of five children born to Wilfred and Claudia (Fischer) Treigle. His introduction to music was through his mother, who played both piano and organ, and his singing career began as a boy soprano in a church choir.

Determined to pursue a musical career, Treigle entered Loyola University where he studied with Elisabeth Wood for seven years. He won the New Orleans Opera House Auditions of the Air in 1947 and made his operatic debut with the company as the Duke of Verona in Roméo et Juliette. Over the next six years he developed a repertoire of twenty-two roles with the New Orleans Opera and studied both drama and ballet to prepare for his career as a singing actor. He sang solos at religious services of all denominations, performed with the New Orleans Pops and the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, and hosted a radio show on WWL. According to his daughter Phyllis, the proprietors of WWL suggested that he change his name from “Addie” to a more professional stage name, and after studying various names, Treigle finally chose “Norman,” the name previously bestowed on his son.

Although only 5’11” and 140 pounds, Treigle had a voice that belied his size and a dazzling acting ability. He was known for his dominating portrayals of Reverend Blitch in Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah, Grandpa Moss in Copland’s The Tender Land, Escamilio in Carmen and Mephistopheles in both Faust and Mephistofele as well the lead roles in Boris Gudonov, Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Gianni Schicchi. He and Beverly Sills often sang together in operas including Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Coq d’Or and Giulio Cesare that was produced to showcase Treigle in the City Opera’s premiere in new facilities at Lincoln Center in 1966.

Despite a vagabond career, he remained a New Orleanian. He and his second wife Linda lived near the lakefront with her daughter, Lisa, who Treigle adopted. His daughter Phyllis Susannah (born in 1961 and named after Phyllis Curtin, Treigle’s Susannah co-star) lived with her mother. He smoked constantly, drank Scotch, enjoyed wagering on the races at the New Orleans Fairgrounds, and was admired for his sense of humor and generosity.

On February 16, 1975, Treigle’s first wife, Loraine, found Treigle dead in his New Orleans apartment. The cause of death originally was thought to be result of a bleeding ulcer, but was later determined by the coroner to be an overdose of sleeping pills. Norman Treigle was forty-seven years old.

The Norman Treigle Papers consists of materials detailing the career and legacy of the opera singer. Press, programs, correspondence, contracts, photographs, costumes, and audio-visual materials are included in the collection. The bulk of the collection covers his years as a performer with some additional materials gathered after his death.

Treigle as Boito's Mefistofele

The collection is comprised of the following series:

Series I: Press & Programs

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Contracts, Royalties & Financial

Series IV: Public Relations & Memorial Fund

Series V: Sheet Music –  Subseries I: Opera Scores – Subseries II: Oratorios and Cantatas – Subseries III: Art Songs & Popular Songs

Series VI: Educational Resources

Series VII: Photographs

Series VIII: Brian Morgan Research Files

Series IX: Scrapbooks & Oversized Publications

Series X: Audio-Visual Materials – Subseries I: Moving Images – Subseries II: Audio

Series XI: Costumes

You can view and research the Norman Treigle Papers Monday through Friday from 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives of Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans.

Happy Valentines Day! From LOYNO SCA!

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY!

Thompson, Basil. Childhood Scrapbook, circa 1900. Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4 Folder 4, Special Collections and Archives, Loyola University New Orleans. http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16313coll91, Louisiana Digital Library

Thompson, Basil. Childhood Scrapbook, circa 1900. Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4 Folder 4, Special Collections and Archives, Loyola University New Orleans. http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16313coll91, Louisiana Digital Library

#ColorOurCollections Week with Identifying Microscopic Fungi

In celebration of #ColorOurCollections Week, we have been looking for some scans from the past that we thought might be fun to decolorize.

One such post from 2014 explores both a book and its author,  Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi.

We were initially impressed by the illustrations… but after being made curious and conducting a little research… we found a man with a truly fascinating life!

Mordecai was a busy guy!

M.C. Cooke did not have much in the way of a formal education but wrote hundreds of articles and books on botany and mycology. Collected roughly 46,000 specimens, contributed over 20 years of service to museum collections while editing journals and founding societies.

Here are the original color plates and the decolorized ones for #ColorOurCollections week:

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#ColorOurCollections

This week is #ColorOurCollections, a week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives has three coloring books available for you to download and print:

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Throughout the week, we’ll also be posting new coloring pages related to our Mardi Gras collections!

Above: Loyola University New Orleans graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks, from the University Photographs Collection. Click here to download.

Once you’ve colored your picture(s), share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

Click here for a list of other institutions participating in #ColorOurCollections to find even more coloring options.

#Feathursday

It’s #feathursday again! These ostriches can be found in the circa 1900 Basil Thompson Childhood Scrapbook in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Book Repair: Syr Perecyvelle of Gales // Kelmscott Press

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Today I completed a series of minor repairs to one of the most fascinating books in our collection, Syr Perecyvelle of Gales. This book was printed in the late nineteenth century at William Morris’ Kelmscott Press, which was famous for its emphasis on hand-craft in bookmaking. You can read more about this book here. If you’re interested in the full scoop on how I completed a resewing and spine repair on this lovely book, please follow this link to Special Collections & Archives’ Tumblr.