Posts Tagged ‘Special Collections’

SC&A Digest: William Faulkner Livre D’artiste and more!

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Images from Tandis que J’agonise, (As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner) a 1946 Parisian “livre d’artiste,” which includes 24 printed engravings by Georges Leblanc as well as beautiful typography and ornamentation composed by Pierre Jeanrot. See more of this book and more posts from our week in Special Collections on Tumblr, and follow us on Instagram @loynosca !

Handwriting in the Archives

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Ah, the days of handwritten notes!

This selection comes from the autograph book of Ida Marie Zorn Thompson(1861-1938), who was between the ages of 15 and 24 and living in New Orleans when the notes were compiled. Written to Ida by various girlfriends, each note sweetly dotes on Ms. Thompson (though not without a tinge of morbidity here and there).

You can view more of Ida’s autograph books as well as scrapbooks and journal entries belonging to her son, New Orleans poet Basil Thompson in the Loyola University New Orleans Scrapbook Collection.

Paul Morphy: The Pride and Sorrow of Chess

Today’s post is dedicated to Paul Morphy, a world-renown chess prodigy born in New Orleans, LA in 1837. Morphy began playing chess as a young man and became notably successful at “blindfold games,” which, yes, required playing without looking at the board.
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*selection of images and text from Life of Paul Morphy in Europe (1859) and Morphy’s Games of Chess (1916).

Morphy was a member of the Chess, Checkers, and Whist Club in New Orleans, which was housed in the Vieux Carré on the corner of Canal and Barronne st. until 1920. A marble bust of Morphy was featured prominently within the club. Join us in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room to learn more about this fascinating man and his adventures in chess!

Born On This Day: Aldous Huxley

Born on July 26th, 1894, Aldous Huxley who is most famously known for his book Brave New World, was an award winning author of over 50 books of fiction and non-fiction, a screenwriter, poet, and late-life philosopher of spirituality.

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In celebration of his birthday, we offer a look at Essays New and Old (1926). Published by Chatto & Windus, the oldest continuous imprint at Penguin UK, this letterpress printing by The Florence Press was limited to 650 copies and is signed by the author.

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This collection’s essays are a varied assortment covering such topics as pop music, advertising, Breughel, and travel.

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“The tourist who has no curiosity is doomed to boredom.”

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Come peruse this item and some of the other interesting and unique collections housed within the Special Collections & Archives in Loyola University’s Monroe Library, Tuesday – Thursday from 9-4:30 (Summer Hours).

Here’s a little something extra, a BBC broadcast interview with Huxley from 1958, where he shares his thoughts on the art of writing.

Here is an additional animated interview created from a source interview conducted by Mike Wallace produced by PBS Digital Studios from May 18, 1958, where Huxley explains Technodictators.

Nexus Press Collection

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One of the pioneer artist’s book and fine press publishers in the South was Nexus Press, which was born out of an artists’ co-op in Atlanta, GA in 1976. Nexus Press was known for collaboration – artists from around the world were often invited to participate in residencies resulting in a small editions of artist’s books. The books were usually offset-printed, which lent itself to Nexus Press’ bold and spontaneous style. Although the organization shut down its presses in 2006, Nexus Press books continue to be prized by libraries collecting artists’ books. We are lucky to hold a few titles from this esteemed press; you can view more photos and information about some of these books here and here or come to the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of the library to see the Nexus Press collection in person!

Dance of the Flyers AKA Voladores ‘Flying Men’

Today in celebration of Cinco De Mayo, we bring you an excerpt of the Mexican Jesuit Francesco Saverio Clavigero’s book, The history of Mexico. Collected from Spanish and Mexican historians, from manuscripts and ancient paintings of the Indians. Illustrated by Charts and other copper plates. To which are added, critical dissertations on the land, the animals, and inhabitants of Mexico.

This book is available for research M-F 9-4:30 and is part of our Archives & Special Collections as well as available electronically as part of the Internet Archive.

I chose to highlight pages 402 through 404 from Volume 1 that give a description of the mesoamerican ritual called the Dance of the Flyers AKA Pole Flying AKA Ceremony of the Voladores (Flying Men). The reason I chose to highlight this section is because I had the opportunity to see a performance of this ritual recently outside of the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City.

This dance has been awarded a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity distinction and is described as follows on their website:

“The ritual ceremony of the Voladores (‘flying men’) is a fertility dance performed by several ethnic groups in Mexico and Central America, especially the Totonac people in the eastern state of Veracruz, to express respect for and harmony with the natural and spiritual worlds. During the ceremony, four young men climb a wooden pole eighteen to forty metres high, freshly cut from the forest with the forgiveness of the mountain god. A fifth man, the Caporal, stands on a platform atop the pole, takes up his flute and small drum and plays songs dedicated to the sun, the four winds and each of the cardinal directions. After this invocation, the others fling themselves off the platform ‘into the void’. Tied to the platform with long ropes, they hang from it as it spins, twirling to mimic the motions of flight and gradually lowering themselves to the ground. Every variant of the dance brings to life the myth of the birth of the universe, so that the ritual ceremony of the Voladores expresses the worldview and values of the community, facilitates communication with the gods and invites prosperity. For the dancers themselves and the many others who participate in the spirituality of the ritual as observers, it encourages pride in and respect for one’s cultural heritage and identity.”

Here is part of Clavigero’s description of the ritual:

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And the copper plate illustration of the ritual that faces page 4o2:

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As an added bonus, here is a short video I shot on my phone while experiencing the performance in February:

Russell Gerard Cresson, 1921 – 2017

Russell Gerard Cresson, for 40-years the official photographer of Loyola, passed away last month on April 23rd at the age of 96.

From 1949 until 1987, Cresson (also an alumnus of the University), documented Loyola’s campus, faculty, staff, students, and events. Much of this record is in our Loyola University Photographs Collection. Not all of our Cresson images have been digitized, but you can view the 8230 currently available through the Louisiana Digital Library.

We here in the Special Collections & Archives extend our deepest sympathies to Cresson’s family and friends and offer our sincere gratitude for his years of dedication to documenting the life of Loyola University.

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Wolf Yearbook picture editor Bob Reso (left) with University photographer Russ Cresson (right)

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

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We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

Marbled Monday: SC&A joins the Art Department

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For this week’s “Marbled Monday” post, I am sharing something a little different than usual. Last Wednesday, I had the pleasure of visiting professor Bill Kitchen’s bookbinding class in Loyola’s art department. As project assistant in Special Collections & Archives, my background in bookbinding and repair is something I love sharing with students interested in book art. I spent the afternoon teaching art students one of my favorite sewing patterns: the French-web or two-hole link stitch binding. I often use this particular sewing structure when repairing dis-bound books in our stacks. I chose to incorporate handmade paper tapes to add a bit of style to the exposed spines of their books and also allow for hard-cover attachment. The students did a fantastic job, and I had a blast working with them!

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

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The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

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The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

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These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.