Posts Tagged ‘Special Collections’

Happy National Limerick Day!

National Limerick Day is observed annually on May 12, the birthday of Edward Lear (1812-1888). Lear is best known for his nonsensical poetry, prose, and limericks.

In celebration, we invite you to enjoy a sampling of Edward Lear’s whimsical poetry and accompanying illustrations as they appear in The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear.

_____

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

_____

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: Ecology Center of Louisiana, Inc., Papers

The Ecology Center of Louisiana, a private, non-profit organization headquartered in New Orleans, collected and disseminated information on Louisiana’s environmental problems and emphasized public participation in resolution of those problems. The Ecology Center, most active between 1970 and 1983, was founded in 1969 around a kitchen table by a group of environmentally conscious citizens. Among them was J. Ross Vincent, a research chemical engineer from Wilmington, Delaware, who would go on to lead the Center for more than a decade.

Center services included a monthly newsletter, lectures and panel discussions on environmental subjects, assistance to schools and teachers in the development of environmental curricula, Louisiana’s first recycling program, an environmental library and hot-line, radio and television programs and lobbying of city, state and federal government representatives. Over time, the Ecology Center became an established resource called upon for expertise and guidance by environmentalists, politicians, business people, students and interested citizens.

Run by a board of directors made up of community members, the Ecology Center was assisted by a professional and volunteer staff and a Board of Advisors, which included the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, two U.S. Congressmen, an Assistant State Attorney General and various other government officials. During one of its busiest periods in early 1971, there were 146 people associated with the Ecology Center, including 131 paying members and 101 active volunteers. To fund its activities, the Center depended almost entirely on the support of its members and on private contributions from concerned citizens and businesses.

Issues and events on which the Center had an impact include limiting the use of the fire ant pesticide Mirex, the first Earth Day celebration in Louisiana, the implementation of the Federal Clean Air Act in Louisiana, public awareness of issues for the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, environmentally conscious urban planning, air pollution, construction of a deep draft oil terminal off of the Louisiana coast, the Waterford Nuclear Power Plant in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, public parks, water and air quality management, and regional transportation planning.

Scope and Content

The arrangement of the Ecology Center of Louisiana papers is largely based on the inventory of creator, J. Ross Vincent. However, a portion of the original subject files was integrated in the interest of cohesiveness. Papers document the activities of the Ecology Center through founding records, correspondence, articles and newsletters on environmental issues from its founding in 1969 until 1987 when J. Ross Vincent, the Center’s president and co-founder moved out of state. The predominant topics of conversation involve environmental issues affecting the state of Louisiana, the support for or opposition to environmental legislation and litigation, and the seeking or dispensing of environmental information.

Papers demonstrate that the Ecology Center was able to establish credibility with government agencies, the business community, organizations of concerned citizens and the public regarding environmental issues that directly affected the state of Louisiana and its inhabitants.

Other than general administrative papers and correspondence, papers are predominately divided by environmental subjects, including Air Pollution, Chemicals, Water Pollution and Coastal Zone Management, Land Use, Transportation, Solid Waste, Energy, Law and Litigation and Organizations, Conferences and Newsletters. Within each of the subjects, there is additional correspondence between the Ecology Center and concerned citizens, environmentalists and politicians. The collection includes information on a broad range of important environmental issues, as well as evidence of efforts by the Ecology Center and the impact of the Center to effect some change for the betterment of the environment.

Finally, the collection includes publications collected by and related to the organization.

_____

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

_____

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy Birthday, J.M. Barrie!

J.M. Barrie, best known as the author and creator of Peter Pan, was born on this day in 1860. Pictured is our 1st edition copy of Barrie’s lesser known 1891 work The Little Minister.

_____

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

_____

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Egypt: Descriptive, Historical, and Picturesque

Today we take a look at volume 2 of a 2 volume set Egypt: Descriptive, Historical, and Picturesque.

We are sharing with you the 2nd volume, since volume 1 is much more fragile. Luckily it has been digitized and is available via Rice University’s The Travelers in the Middle East Archive (TIMEA) and through the Internet Archive.

IMG_0995

This book was compiled and written by Professor George Mortiz Ebers and translated by Clara Bell. Ebers was a German Egyptologist and writer (1837 –1898). Clara Bell (1834–1927) was a translator best know for her translation of the 90-volume work  The Human Comedy by Honoré de Balzac. Heavily illustrated, with over 400 images, with gilt edges. It is a large book at 387 pages and measuring 12 1/4″ x 15″ making the digitization of it a joy not only of access but for its ease of use.

IMG_0996

IMG_0985

Today we offer you a selection of images (all of the artists are credited at the front of each volume) from the book with corresponding links to modern images, additional information, and locations of the sites.

IMG_0994

Located here. Also, a modern day image of the temple. It is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

IMG_0992

Image of Sekhmet statues near the Temple of Mut in Karnak, located here.

IMG_0990

IMG_0991

IMG_0983

IMG_0986

IMG_0989

IMG_0987

Come check out this or one of our other rare books housed in the Special Collections & Archives at Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans, M-F 9-4:30.

The Anatomy Of Melancholy

First published in 1621, The Anatomy of Melancholy was subsequently repeatedly expanded by its author Robert Burton (an Oxford don who also worked in the Oxford Library) 6 more times during his lifetime. His work in the library is informative in that The Anatomy of Melancholy is a book of many books, filled with citations, quotations, and interpretations of various specialists.

IMG_0973

Robert Burton is pictured (above) holding a book.

Burton, as described in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature, was “subject to depression of spirits” and wrote the book as an “antidote” for his own melancholy. A su generis work that covers much more territory than to just anatomize melancholy (though it is a dissection of it), it is a book that seeks to explain human emotions, and is a compendia of printed knowledge and science of the time.

It is composed of three parts:

First Partition = Causes of Melancholy

Second Partition = The Cure of Melancholy

Third Partition = Love Melancholy and Religious Melancholy

IMG_0977

The book is rooted in the dominate Greek Medicine theory of Humoralism. Within this theory, melancholy (clinical depression) is attributed to black bile, one of the Four Humors.

The Four Humors and their corresponding qualities:

Blood = Sanguine = Spring = hot and moist

Yellow Bile = Choleric = Summer = hot and dry

Black Bile = Melancholic = Autumn = cold and dry

Phlegm = Phlegmatic = Winter = cold and moist

Galen of Pergamon theories on the Humoral System of medicine influenced Western medicine for over a century. His theory of the Four Humors consisted of a holistic system that drew upon the Platonic philosophy of the relationship between the mind and the body. These fluids ran all through the body and where all thought to be present in the blood. For instance, if you poured a person’s blood into a glass, it would (theoretically) separate into these four fluids. These fluids and their corresponding temperaments (mind-body connections) need to be in balance for health, while disease occurs when they are out of balance. Treatments like blood letting, purging, vomiting, and food sought to bring the humors back into equilibrium.

IMG_0978

Burton wrote, and rewrote, The Anatomy of Melancholy as a treatment for his own struggles with depression. The fact that he revised and expanded the work with six published editions is a testament to his obsessiveness regarding the process and the need to “write of melancholy by being busy to avoid melancholy”.

We have two different editions here in the Special Collections and Archives and you can also find it online in full-text. It is a fascinating book that is satirical and serious and of a time when scholars wrote and read across the disciplines of science, medicine, and philosophy.

And here’s a little something extra: A BBC Radio IN OUR TIME  broadcast on the book.

Knowledge of the World by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Knowledge of the World

Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Atlanta: Nexus Press, 1998.

(Edition of 200)

Knowledge of the World consists of 200 loose-leaf artist cards featuring color reproductions of work produced by prolific Ivorian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré (c. 1923-2014).

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

_____

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Library Transformation

It’s National Library Week, and in Special Collections we’re taking a cue from our colleagues at the Othmer Library and using the theme of Transforming Libraries to show how our library buildings have transformed. For starters, the first library on campus was the Bobet Library in Marquette Hall.
BOBET LIBRARY, MARQUETTE HALL – 1913

  • Cost: $12,000
  • Size: 1,989 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 50,000
  • Architects: DeBuys, Churchill & Labouisse
  • Dedicated to: Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Bobet

Bobet Library, 1913

Construction of Marquette Hall was completed in 1912, and the Bobet Library on the 2nd floor was dedicated the following year. At the time of the construction of the Bobet Library, Albert Biever, S.J. (founder of Loyola) was president, and James J. O’Brien, S.J. became head librarian. An article published in The Daily Picayune on 13 July, 1913 entitled, “Old Treasures of Loyola’s New Library” stated: “Loyola in her new development is young and formative, but behind its growth is strength and in its development there is purpose…A tour of the university is delightful, but one would better not start from the library. It is a room to induce bibliomania – and the world might go by.”

MAIN LIBRARY – 1950

  • Cost: $800,000
  • Size: 36,711 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 250,000
  • Architects: Wogan, Bernard & De La Vergne
  • Dedicated to: Students & Alumni killed in WWII

Main Library, 1960s

Construction of the new library building commenced in 1947, and was situated between Bobet and Marquette Halls. Archbishop Joseph Francis Rummel delivered the dedicatory blessing upon completion of the building on Palm Sunday, 1950. The proceedings were aired by WWL-Radio. Students helped to move the books from Bobet Library to the new Main Library. A quote by poet Paul L. Callens, S.J inscribed over the Main Library entrance reads, “The monuments which learned men have built for us throughout the ages you will find accumulated in these books.”

Main Library construction

Main Library book display

Main Library

J. EDGAR AND LOUISE S. MONROE LIBRARY – 1999

  • Cost: $20,000,000
  • Size: 148,480 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 500,000
  • Architects: The Mathes Group
  • Dedicated to: J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe

Monroe Library, 2016

Groundbreaking ceremonies commenced in November 1996 for the new J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library by co-chairs of the capital campaign, Adelaide Wisdom Benjamin and Michael J. Rapier. Other university and community dignitaries assisted in the ceremony. Construction began that month, and continued through completion of the building in October 1998. Library faculty and staff worked with Covan movers to transport the collection from the Main Library to the Monroe Library. The new J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library opened its doors for patrons on January 11, 1999.

Monroe Library Computer Lab, 2003

Monroe Library Reference Desk, 2003

Monroe Library Learning Commons, 2008

Monroe Library Snowflake, 2008

More information about the library’s history can be found in our new Loyola University New Orleans Library History Collection.

UP001949

How have libraries transformed YOU?

Collection Spotlight: Dawson Gaillard Papers

Dawson Ann Forman Gaillard Keefe was born on September 25, 1938, in Marietta, Georgia, and grew up in Monroe (Ouachita Parish), Louisiana, graduating from Neville High School. She earned a B. A. in Social Studies and English at Louisiana State University (1959) and both a Master’s (1965) and Doctorate in English (1970) from Tulane University. Gaillard was a member of the faculty of Loyola University New Orleans from 1968 to 1983, and served as chair of that department from 1974 to 1977. She also edited the New Orleans Review from 1973 to 1979.

She worked as copy manager for the LSU Press from 1979 to 1981 and wrote the copy for the advertisements and book jackets of Confederacy of Dunces and other titles.  Gaillard authored a book entitled Dorothy L. Sayers (1980) on the English mystery writer and (with colleague John Mosier)  co-edited a groundbreaking anthology of short fiction, Women and Men Together (1978).

Her battle with multiple sclerosis contributed to her eventual departure from academic and professional life, and on October 1, 1985 she died in an accident at her home in Metairie, Louisiana.  The annual Dawson Gaillard Writing Awards are held in her honor at Loyola University, recognizing student work in the categories of expository writing, creative non-fiction, poetry, fiction, and script.

The Dawson Gaillard Papers consist primarily of the personal and professional writings of Dr. Dawson Gaillard. These include…

Her personal diaries from 1951 to 1985:

Gaillard-diaries

Gaillard-diary-inside

Academic work and research papers written as a student and teacher:

Gaillard-MQ

Samples of her copyediting work from LSU Press, and a small amount of original nonfiction, fiction and poetry: Gaillard-Superbug

Gaillard-photos

Also included is research related to the 1927 murder trial of Ada LeBouef and Dr. Tom Dreher, including two audiocassette tapes of interviews conducted by Gaillard with Murphy Dreher, Tom Dreher’s nephew, and Mrs. Waleer Hamlin, the wife of Ada LeBouef’s lawyer.

Gaillard-notes

Gaillard-tapes

The Dawson Gaillard Papers are available for viewing in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Rare Irish Books

We just can’t get enough of Irish literature and history books in Special Collections & Archives (previously here, here, here, and here). To celebrate another St. Patrick’s Day, here are some more images of rare books about St. Patrick and Ireland in our collection.

From St. Patrick, apostle of Ireland:
St-Patrick-cover

St-Patrick-TP

From St. Patrick’s Day Sermon:

St-Patrick-Sermon-TP

From History of Ireland:

History-Ireland-end-paper

History-Ireland-illustration

History-Ireland-illustration-2

These and many more can be viewed in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

The New Orleans Mint, March 8th, 1838

Today in celebration of the 178th anniversary of the opening of the New Orleans Mint, we bring you some images and info from the book Illustrated History of the United States Mint.

MINT008

Published in 1892, the book gives a complete overview of the American coinage history and production at the time.

MINT002
MINT007 MINT001

 

Here are the pages specific to the the New Orleans Mint:

MINT004

MINT003 MINT005

If you would like to take a closer look at this volume or other books on the history of New Orleans, come visit the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

~~~~~~~~~~~

Here’s a Library Lagniappe for you. A film from 1940 showing how coins are minted!