Posts Tagged ‘rare books’

Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc., 1871

Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc. Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc.Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc.Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc.Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc.Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc.Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc.
I am currently working on a housing project for our oversized books, and today I happened upon this gem (in desperate need of a box). Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, Etc. is filled from cover to cover with chromolithographs of lock and key hardware. Nearly all of the images were printed with metallic inks that add glamour to the objects. Now to construct a clamshell box for this very deserving book!

Creole Voices

Continuing our celebration of Black History Month, the following pair of books are just a few of the many items related to the history of Louisiana’s people of color in Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives.

Creole voices; poems in French by free men of color (in French, Les Cenelles), was published in 1845 by Armand Lanusse, a free man of color living in New Orleans. The poetry collection was a landmark publication. Lanusse worked most of his career as a teacher at the L’Institution Catholique des Orphelins Indigents. An original edition of Les Cenelles is digitized and available online in the Louisiana Digital Library thanks to the Historic New Orleans Collection.

Nearly 100 years later, Lanusse’s work was highlighted by Charles Barthelemy Roussève, who was born to an accomplished black Creole family in 1902. After studies at Xavier Preparatory School and Straight College, Roussève  completed his master’s degree in history from Xavier University of New Orleans where his thesis, The Negro in Louisiana; aspects of his history and his literature, became the first book-length publication issued by Xavier University Press. The Negro in Louisiana drew attention to Lanusse’s little known Les Cenelles.

Roussève went on to work as an educator in New Orleans for 45 years as both a teacher and a principal and also published poetry, prose, and translations. Roussève’s papers are held at the Amistad Research Center.

Both of these books and many more like them are available for research in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

On This Day in 1884, Cotton Centennial

The World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-85

December 16, 1884 marked the opening day of The World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition. The Cotton Planter’s Association chose to commemorate the first recorded shipment of cotton from the United States to England, which happened in 1784, at the World’s Fair that year in New Orleans.

Special Collections & Archives has several books commemorating the Exposition. The World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-85 describes the opening ceremony and exhibits in the fair. Each state in the U.S. (of which there were 38 at the time), the 7 territories (Arizona, Dakota, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Washington, Wyoming), and 17 foreign nations (of which the Mexico exhibit was particularly lauded) had its own exhibit, and there were also dedicated  exhibits on the government, education, women, people of color, the railway, horticulture, art, and livestock.

Catalogue of the art collection describes the art on display at the exhibition and includes prices.

Finally, Map of the city of New Orleans showing location of exposition grounds and all approaches thereto by land & water shows the exhibition’s locations around the city as well as drawings of some of the exhibition buildings. Special Collections & Archives’ copies are very fragile, but the map is digitized and available online in David Rumsey’s Map Collection, Harvard University’s Digital Maps Collection, the University of Milwaukee’s American Geographical Society Library – Maps Collection, and Wikimedia Commons (shown below). Most of the exhibition took place in what is now Audubon Park.

There are many more items related to the Cotton Centennial in the Louisiana Digital Library, including LSU’s  New Orleans Centennial Exposition Stereoscopic Views collection.

A Louisiana "Swamp Angel," G. & S. Building, from New Orleans Centennial Exposition Stereoscopic Views, LOUISiana Digital Library, Baton Rouge, La.

You can view the three books detailed above in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives, Monroe Library, Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm.

Letterpress in the Archives: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana” 1916

CitizensBank_spread

There is no reason to doubt that it was the Citizens’ Bank that gave the name “Dixie” to the South. The origin of that word has never been positively determined, but the tradition that gives the credit to the Citizens’ Bank is certainly stronger than any of the other claims advanced. When the country was flooded with wild-cat money and counterfeiting was so common as to cast suspicion on nearly every species of paper money, the notes of this bank commanded respect throughout the great valley, and, in fact, everywhere in the country, and its ten-dollar notes were the standard of value. These notes in ante-bellum days were printed in the French language, and instead of bearing the numeral in English, they bore the French word “dix.” It became common when one was passing down the great river to trade at the Southern metropolis for him to say that he was going South to acquire some dixes. Thus it happened that the lower stretches of the river became known as the land of the dixies, or “Dixie land.”

“Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana”, New Orleans, 1916, p. 11

As the new project assistant in Special Collections & Archives here at Loyola, I have thoroughly enjoyed perusing the stacks as I better acquaint myself with the collection. Since my academic background is in printmaking and book arts, I naturally gravitate towards the rare books on our shelves, and I am continuously fascinated by the bindings and material qualities of these old books. Today I would like to share with you this small letterpress-printed pamphlet: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana,” New Orleans, 1916.

A modest book at first glance, “Citizens’ Bank..” is a lovely example of early twentieth century letterpress-printing. Although there is no press information on the title page of this pamphlet, there are clues in the tactile quality of the book that reveal how it was printed and what materials were used. It is sewn with a silky cord, and a knot tied on the spine of the book allows the pamphlet to close flat.  It is composed of a high-quality mould-made paper, which is evident in the paper’s strong, visible fibers and deckled edge, as well as watermarks that are visible when certain pages are held up to bright light. If you were to lightly brush your finger along the text of this book, you’d notice a texture, an imprint, which occurs because of the amount of pressure applied in the printing process. At close inspection you’d see that some of the text is over-inked in places, which creates a small puddle around individual letters. I could go on and on about the letterpress process, but instead I’ll refer you to this resource if you’d like to learn more.

This book was letterpress printed on high quality paper because its materials were likely intended to reflect the history of a wealthy institution: the Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana. Its brief 31 pages outline the history of the bank, and the book serves as a well-crafted advertisement for the financial institution. You can view more images of this book (and many more) on our tumblr, or come in for a visit on the third floor of Monroe Library!

Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants (Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen)

Published in 1828, Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen (Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants), by Johann Gottlieb Mann, contains hand-colored lithographs of medical plants, flowers, and fruits. Here is a small selection. To view more of these lithographs click HERE to access them via Louisiana Digital Library.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

Rare Irish Books

We just can’t get enough of Irish literature and history books in Special Collections & Archives (previously here, here, here, and here). To celebrate another St. Patrick’s Day, here are some more images of rare books about St. Patrick and Ireland in our collection.

From St. Patrick, apostle of Ireland:
St-Patrick-cover

St-Patrick-TP

From St. Patrick’s Day Sermon:

St-Patrick-Sermon-TP

From History of Ireland:

History-Ireland-end-paper

History-Ireland-illustration

History-Ireland-illustration-2

These and many more can be viewed in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.