Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

Found in the Archives: Estrays

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Today we take a glance at a thin volume of poetry. Estrays was first published in 1918 and then again edited and in hardcover in 1920. It is populated with poetry composed by the poets: Thomas Kennedy, George Steele SeymourVincent Starrett, and Basil Thompson.

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Below is a selection of a poem that that is both representative of the collections’ title and themes (estray : stray); The Quest, by Thomas Kennedy.

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You can browse either edition Monday – Friday from 9:00-4:30  in Booth-Bricker Reading Room inside the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Happy National Limerick Day!

National Limerick Day is observed annually on May 12, the birthday of Edward Lear (1812-1888). Lear is best known for his nonsensical poetry, prose, and limericks.

In celebration, we invite you to enjoy a sampling of Edward Lear’s whimsical poetry and accompanying illustrations as they appear in The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Poetry Post: ADRIAN D. SCHWARTZ

Today, we at Library Lagniappe want to offer you some little-known poetry.

Adrian D. Schwartz was a historian and a poet who lived on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain he was seemingly a prominent man in St. Tammany Parish often showing up in the local newspaper.

He most likely didn’t make his living from writing, but a little bit of research implies that he might have wanted to.

Two books of poetry were published in 1914 & 1915, with publications regarding the history of St. Tammany Parish being published some 40-50 years later, in 1953 and 1963.

The only volumes we have in our collections are one book of poetry (reviewed HERE in 1920) and a sesquicentennial publication for St. Tammany Parish. Both of these are available in our Special Collections & Archives.

Here is a selection of two fall-themed poems from our copy of his Roses of Shadow; The Dream-mender; Wild pear and Maize.

Enjoy!

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Come read this and many other Monroe Library SCA poetry books,  Monday-Friday 9-4:30.

Collection Spotlight: Kate Holmes Collection of Southern Stories and Poems

Kate Holmes was the daughter of a sea captain and a writer from New Orleans who produced poems and stories about New Orleans and Southern history. Her writings were published in both local newspapers and other Southern periodicals such as the Times- Picayune (New Orleans, LA), Dixie-Roto Magazine (New Orleans, LA), Cycle-Flame Poetry Magazine (San Angelo, TX), and Scimitar & Song Poetry Magazine (Sanford, NC). She died in New Orleans on March 10, 1975 at the age of 79.

The collection consists of twenty poems, three song lyrics, and eight newspaper articles written by Kate Holmes and published from 1947 through 1974.

“Camel-Back” Homes-1909

Lagniappe: The Camelback Shotgun is essentially a Shotgun single or a Shotgun double with a second story rising at the rear portion of the building. To read more about building types and architectural styles prevalent in New Orleans, click here!

To view the Kate Holmes Collection of Southern Stories and Poems visit Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: J. Gentil Papers

Jean Sylvain Gentil (1829-1911)*, a native of France and lifelong proponent of democratic principles, left his country in 1850 as a political exile following imprisonment and expulsion by Emperor Napoleon III. Gentil settled in Saint James Parish, Louisiana in 1853 and obtained a professorship of foreign languages at Jefferson College, a small Catholic school. Following the Civil War, Gentil continued his political activism by partnering with Armand Victor Romain to produce the weekly Le Louisianais. In 1881, Gentil sold Le Louisianais to André Roman and Paul Grima, who continued producing the newspaper until 1883. Gentil subsequently owned La Démocratie française of New Orleans and wrote articles for various other publications. In addition to political pieces, Gentil composed a great deal of poetry throughout his life.

The J. Gentil Papers consists of three handwritten documents, all of them in French. The leather-bound volume, titled “Chants de L’exil,” includes sixteen poems or songs. It is unclear if the entries are gathered or the original work of Gentil; entries list a geographic location and date. The other two documents, “Instruction et Avenir” and an untitled manuscript, refer to “College de la Louisiane” and “University de la Louisiane” respectively, suggesting the texts are commencement speeches.

Researchers can view the documents online here or request the original manuscripts by consulting with archives staff. Loyola University Special Collections & Archives is located on the third floor of Monroe Library and is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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*In his book Les écrits de langue française en Louisiane au XIXe siècle, Edward Larocque Tinker presents Gentil’s full name as Jean-Sylvain Gentil; however, Gentil signed himself “J. Gentil” or used one of his noms de plume, which included Jean Gribouille, J. Gringoire, J. Gueux, J. G. jardinier (or, jardinier louisianais), and Simplex.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

The Art of Fore-edge Painting

Today, our exploration of Special Collections & Archives uncovers seldom-seen examples of disappearing fore-edge paintings!

Fore-edge painting, simply put, is the technique of applying paint to the edges of the pages of a book. Two types of fore-edge paintings survive, including those applied to closed fore-edges (visible) and adversely, applied to fanned fore-edges (disappearing).

Above: The Pilgrim’s Progress: In Two Parts

While visible fore-edge painting dates back (possibly) as far as the 10th century with the earliest signed and dated example citing 1653, the techniques employed to create mysterious, disappearing fore-edge paintings developed slightly later and reached peak popularity during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Above: The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier

In order to produce a disappearing fore-edge painting, a skilled artisan renders the desired scene on the fanned pages of a manuscript using watercolor pigment. After the paint has thoroughly dried, the book is closed and subsequently, gold is applied to the fore-edges. The watercolor painting is thus rendered “invisible” by gilding and only becomes visible when the text’s pages are fanned.

Above: The Poetical Works of John Milton

These and several other fore-edge painted books gems are available for viewing in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 and Friday, 9:00-12:00! You can also learn more about the history and production techniques of fore-edge painting by perusing books like this one.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.