Posts Tagged ‘News’

Collection Spotlight: Phil Johnson Editorials Collection

A television broadcasting legend in New Orleans, Phil Johnson worked for nearly 40 years at the city’s top-ranked CBS affiliate, WWL-TV. During his career, he served as promotion director, documentary producer, news directors, assistant general manager, and editorialist. Johnson retired from WWL-TV in 1999.

A graduate of New Orleans’ Jesuit High School (1946) and Loyola University (1950), Johnson began his journalism career at the now defunct Item newspaper. His print experience also included a brief stint in print journalism in Chicago, and a prestigious Neiman Fellowship at Harvard University in 1959. He would return home, at the dawn of the local television era, taking a position as promotion director at WWL-TV in 1960, just three years after the station signed on the air.

As a professional communicator Johnson received countless honors and awards. His writing and narration of television documentaries earned him an Emmy and three George Foster Peabody Awards: in 1970, for a documentary called “Israel: The New Frontier;” in 1972, for “China ’72: A Hole in the Bamboo Curtain,” which featured footage filmed by the first non-network American news team allowed into the Communist nation in almost 25 years; and in 1982, for “The Search for Alexander.” Johnson also served as a war correspondent, reporting for the station from Vietnam, Beirut and Israel.

New Orleans viewers may know him best for the 10,000 broadcast editorials he produced throughout his tenure as editorialist at WWL-TV, presenting the station’s editorial opinion on local, state and national topics from 1962 to 1999.

In 1997, Johnson was named to the New Orleans Broadcasting Hall of Fame and merited a Lifetime Achievement Award from his peers in the Press Club of New Orleans.

In 1999, Johnson’s alma mater, Loyola University New Orleans, awarded him its Integritas Vitae Award, the university’s highest honor for an individual “with a high moral character in a lifetime of unselfish service without exception of material award or public recognition.”

The editorials in this collection were authored by Phil Johnson during his long career at WWL-TV and aired on the station as a regular nightly presentation from March, 1962 through July, 1999. Following his retirement Johnson returned to deliver infrequent editorials at Christmas, and on the occasion of a colleague’s death.

WWL-TV was established by Loyola University New Orleans in 1957 and owned by the university until 1990.

The collection chronicles the 36-year political history of New Orleans and Louisiana from 1962-1999. All editorials were written and delivered by Johnson unless otherwise noted in the index. Please refer to the index key of designations.


Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.


Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Recent Acquisitions: Fine Press & Artists’ Books

Special Collections & Archives proudly presents Recent Acquisitions: Fine Press & Artists’ Books!

Curated to highlight several exciting new additions to our book collection, Recent Acquisitions: Fine Press & Artists’ Books features the work of five contemporary artisans who uniquely reimagine text, illustration, and “book” form to create engaging works of art.

The exhibition is on view in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room through July 31, 2015.

As always, all are welcome to join us in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 and Friday, 9:00-12:00.

Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Rachel, installing the exhibition.

We’re Hiring! PT Learning Commons & Stacks Assistant

The Monroe Library seeks a Part-time Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant who will provide basic circulation, reference, and technology assistance in an active learner-centered environment. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is responsible for conducting collection inventory and stacks maintenance. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is also responsible for opening the library Monday through Friday.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree or two years of college and two years of library experience; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with library users and colleagues; excellent customer services skills; skills and experience in the use of computer applications for word processing, scanning, printing, spreadsheets; comfort with the use of technology for data analysis; collaborative problem-solving skills and initiative with a high degree of accuracy in complex, detailed work.

Physical Requirements: Access upper library shelves with a step stool and bend to lower shelves; lift and carry equipment, supplies, or materials weighing up to 30 lbs; push a fully loaded, wheeled, book cart, up to 100 lbs.; sustain long periods of standing/walking back and forth; bend, stoop, and reach equipment and materials.

For info on how to apply, see:

Banned Books Week September 25 – October 2, 2010

Poster by Camden Forgia

Everyone knows that librarians are tough, gritty, rogue characters who will fight to the death in defense of the First Amendment. But did you know that the last week of September, librarians and readers everywhere celebrate the freedom to read? That’s right folks, September 25th marks the first day of Banned Book Week, a national event where we commemorate and celebrate books that have been challenged or banned by bookstores, schools, and libraries across the nation. Some famous banned books you may have heard of include J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the Twilight series by Stephanie Meyer, and even Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants series.

Banned Books Week began in 1982 as a response to a sudden increase in the number of book challenges happening across the country. The ALA defines a challenge as an attempt to remove or restrict materials, and a ban as the removal of those materials. While book challenges may come from a sincere and well-meaning attempt to protect readers from content that may be deemed too sexual, violent, profane, or offensive, the line between protection and censorship is a fine one. The ALA states that only parents have the rights and responsibility to restrict what their own children read, so libraries fight censorship by refusing to ban books.

So what can you do to celebrate Banned Books Week? You can come to the Monroe Library and see our display of banned books, check out the American Library Association’s list of frequently challenged books, or find a Banned Books event either local or online. For more information, visit the American Library Association’s Banned and Challenged Books page and Banned Books Week.