Posts Tagged ‘New Orleans’

deLesseps Story “Chep” Morrison, Honorary Degree Recipient

deLesseps Story “Chep” Morrison, Sr., was an attorney and politician. He served as the 54th Mayor of New Orleans from 1946-1961 and as an United States ambassador under President John F. Kennedy from 1961-1963.

Loyola awarded Morrison with an Honorary degree at the 1958 Commencement Ceremony.

deLesseps Story "Chep" Morrison

deLesseps Story Morrison at graduation

deLesseps Story Morrison

Fr. Donnelly, deLesseps Story Morrison and Archbishop Rummel at graduation

As mayor, Morrison engaged in more large-scale urban renewal by helping in the construction for the New Orleans Civic Center, the New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal, several street-widening projects, and the construction and expansion of the New Orleans housing projects.

deLesseps Story Morrison

Archbishop Rummel (middle), deLesseps Story Morrison (right), and student at graduation

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed Morrison as the ambassador to the Organization of American States, a inter-continental organization that promotes solidarity and cooperation among its members.

deLesseps Story Morrison

Fr. Donnelly (left), Archbishop Rummel (middle), and Honorary Degree recipient deLesseps Story "Chep" Morrison at graduation

On May 22, 1964, deLesseps Story “Chep” Morrison and his son Randy died in a plane crash in Ciuadad Victoria, Mexico.

deLesseps Story Morrison

deLesseps Story Morrison makes speech at commencement

To honor him and his political legacy, deLesseps Morrison, Sr., was posthumously inducted into the Louisiana Political Hall of Fame in 1995.

Blog Post by Raven Evans, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

History of Mass Tourism collection

Special Collections & Archives is very excited to announce that Adam Matthew Digital recently released The History of Mass Tourism, a collection of primary sources from around the world. The digital collection includes two from Special Collections & Archives: the Anthony J. Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary Collection and the Anthony J. Stanonis Collection of New Orleans tourism.

From their website:

“This resource presents a multi-national journey through well-known, little-known and far-flung destinations unlocked for the average traveller between 1850 and the 1980s. Guidebooks and brochures, periodicals, travel agency correspondence, photographs and personal travel journals provide unique insight into the expansion, accessibility and affordability of tourism for the masses and the evolution of some of the most successful travel agencies in the world.”

Partnering with Adam Matthew enabled nearly the entirety of both Stanonis collections to be digitized in full, and we are in very good company along with:

  • Blackpool Central Library Local History Centre
  • Brooklyn Historical Society
  • California Historical Society
  • The Camping and Caravanning Club Archive
  • John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, Duke University
  • George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
  • Massachusetts Historical Society
  • Michigan State University Libraries
  • New Hampshire Historical Society
  • The Newberry Library
  • The New York Academy of Medicine Library
  • Thomas Cook Archives
  • The National Archives, UK
  • University of Westminster Archive

The site requires a subscription, but the Monroe Library has trial access through July 8. Please visit the front desk to be logged in.

Image from The Bachelor in New Orleans, included in The History of Mass Tourism

We are thrilled that so many people will be able to use these collections digitally. Thank you to Adam Matthew for including us in this resource.

Collection Spotlight: Phil Johnson Editorials Collection

A television broadcasting legend in New Orleans, Phil Johnson worked for nearly 40 years at the city’s top-ranked CBS affiliate, WWL-TV. During his career, he served as promotion director, documentary producer, news directors, assistant general manager, and editorialist. Johnson retired from WWL-TV in 1999.

A graduate of New Orleans’ Jesuit High School (1946) and Loyola University (1950), Johnson began his journalism career at the now defunct Item newspaper. His print experience also included a brief stint in print journalism in Chicago, and a prestigious Neiman Fellowship at Harvard University in 1959. He would return home, at the dawn of the local television era, taking a position as promotion director at WWL-TV in 1960, just three years after the station signed on the air.

As a professional communicator Johnson received countless honors and awards. His writing and narration of television documentaries earned him an Emmy and three George Foster Peabody Awards: in 1970, for a documentary called “Israel: The New Frontier;” in 1972, for “China ’72: A Hole in the Bamboo Curtain,” which featured footage filmed by the first non-network American news team allowed into the Communist nation in almost 25 years; and in 1982, for “The Search for Alexander.” Johnson also served as a war correspondent, reporting for the station from Vietnam, Beirut and Israel.

New Orleans viewers may know him best for the 10,000 broadcast editorials he produced throughout his tenure as editorialist at WWL-TV, presenting the station’s editorial opinion on local, state and national topics from 1962 to 1999.

In 1997, Johnson was named to the New Orleans Broadcasting Hall of Fame and merited a Lifetime Achievement Award from his peers in the Press Club of New Orleans.

In 1999, Johnson’s alma mater, Loyola University New Orleans, awarded him its Integritas Vitae Award, the university’s highest honor for an individual “with a high moral character in a lifetime of unselfish service without exception of material award or public recognition.”

The editorials in this collection were authored by Phil Johnson during his long career at WWL-TV and aired on the station as a regular nightly presentation from March, 1962 through July, 1999. Following his retirement Johnson returned to deliver infrequent editorials at Christmas, and on the occasion of a colleague’s death.

WWL-TV was established by Loyola University New Orleans in 1957 and owned by the university until 1990.

The collection chronicles the 36-year political history of New Orleans and Louisiana from 1962-1999. All editorials were written and delivered by Johnson unless otherwise noted in the index. Please refer to the index key of designations.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: Historic Postcard Collection

Series I of the collection includes postcards that consist of true photographs, both hand colored and black and white, as well as hand drawn images of Catholic structures and locations throughout the state of Louisiana, including postcards of Loyola University in New Orleans. The majority of the postcards depict the exterior of churches, but there are several interior images and other exterior subjects included. A majority of the postcards in this series are addressed to Mrs. Lena Sawyer, a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana.

This is an artificial collection informally collected over time at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives.

Series II of the collection features postcards and postcard booklets from foreign locations, mainly in France and Switzerland. None of the postcards in this series are addressed.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Lunch at Tujague’s in 1945

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Cover

One of the fascinating things about reading through someone’s personal papers are the minute details you uncover. One such example is from this scrapbook, inscribed “Florida 1945 Ado + Neva” on the cover.

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Page 37

Maude Lehman Liersch (1895-1977) assembled this scrapbook to document several trips she took with her husband Joe, a physician and son of one of Kansas City’s pioneer druggists. The bulk of the scrapbook is taken up by a road trip the Lierschs took with friends Adolph “Ado” or “Otto” F.  (1884-1961) and Neva  Wiedenmann Seidel (1890-1979) from October 27-November 9, 1945. The quartet began in their hometown of Kansas City, Missouri and circled the Midwestern, Southeastern, and Southwestern United States. Destinations included Springfield, MO; Memphis and Chattanooga, Tennessee; Tifton, Georgia;  Melbourne, Key West, Fort Myers, Sulphur Spring, Silver Springs, and Pensacola, Florida; New Orleans and Thibodeaux, Louisiana; Houston, Texas; and Mena, Arkansas. Maude took detailed notes of all food and beverage as well as prices for their accommodations. In her entry for their visit to New Orleans, she writes:

Tuesday, Nov. 6 – 1945

Left at 5:20 a.m. Went through Bankhead tunnel under Mobile river at Mobile, Ala. 25c – Had breakfast at Mobile at Toddle House. Waffle and ham – Service was poor as changed shifts – boys left and girls came on. Joe and I did not get coffee. Stopped at Biloxi for sweet rolls and coffee – Very good. Reached New Orleans 10:50 a.m. Took a guide $2.00 each – all over old part of New Orleans as well as new. Had lunch at 2 o’clock at “Tujague’s” – soup, meat, lettuce, roast beef, cauliflower, hard bread, cream puff, coffee. Had coffee and donuts at old market. Went on wharf where were unloading coffee from Brazil and then conducted over U.S. Mississippi. Berries from a camphor tree in cemetery. Detour to Thibodeaux - French people – stayed at Dixie Hotel. Almost did not get a place to stay. Each had a room – just wash stand in room. $2.00 couple. Ate in Hotel. Asked if wished French drip or Maxwell House coffee. Walked around town – Bought clothespins 25c doz. Night at Thibodeaux. One of the first trading posts between New Orleans, and country along Teche Bayou. Adjacent to oil field.

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Page 38

Tujague’s, est. 1856, is the second oldest restaurant in the French Quarter. A look at their current menu shows many of the same dishes Maude ate.

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Page 40

Perennial Special Collections favorite The Bachelor in New Orleans (published in 1942) described Tujague’s as “an old timey drinkery that pays little attention to fashion in bars. Here you will find no red leather bar stools, no super-duper fixtures. Here is drink served in the way and in the surroundings your father drank it. Specialty of the house is the Absinthe frappe.”

This scrapbook is part of the Anthony Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary Collection and is currently on display in our exhibit Media Traditions:  Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation along with other scrapbooks that draw correlations between memory archives of the past and contemporary modes of self-presentation. Portions of the exhibit are view-able from the Monroe Library 3rd floor hallway and the rest are in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections and Archives Reading Room, open Monday – Friday 9am-4:30pm.

Collection Spotlight: Anthony J. Stanonis Collection

Anthony J. Stanonis received a B.A. in history from Loyola University New Orleans in 1997, then an M.A. in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2003, both in history, from Vanderbilt University. Stanonis’s research interests have centered on the cultural and economic implications of urban tourism. While researching the history of tourism in New Orleans for his dissertation, he acquired an assortment of artifacts generated by that city’s tourist industry. His research resulted in the publication of his book, Creating the Big Easy: New Orleans and the Emergence of Modern Tourism, 1918-1945, published in 2006 by the University of Georgia Press.

This collection comprises Stanonis’s personal acquisitions of materials pertaining to the New Orleans tourist industry. It includes guides, maps, brochures, books, and other literature put out by public and private groups and businesses, spanning roughly from 1902 to 1960.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Get Figgy With It!

Celebrate National Fig Week by learning a little about the fig and exploring these recipes found in our copy of the Picayune’s Creole Cook Book!

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The Picayune Creole cook book (4th ed.). (1910?). New Orleans, La.: The Times-Picayune

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The Picayune Creole cook book (4th ed.). (1910?). New Orleans, La.: The Times-Picayune

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The Picayune Creole cook book (4th ed.). (1910?). New Orleans, La.: The Times-Picayune

Fig trees (Ficus carica) are one of the earliest fruit trees cultivated by humans. Figs are not only delicious, they are also a fruit of legend, literature, and the sacred.

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Condit, I. (1947). The fig. Waltham, Mass.: Chronica Botanica.

The fig tree is employed in Greek (Sykeus) and Roman (Bachus) Mythology, Homer’s Odyssey and Iliad, Charles Dickens’s Dombey and Son, Shakespeare’s Henry V., the Bible, and numerous others references and symbolic uses abound. Just start searching and you will find yourself following the “red thread” of the fig tree and its relationship with man.

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Condit, I. (1947). The fig. Waltham, Mass.: Chronica Botanica.

Most of us primarily look to the fig for nourishment and the subtropical climate of Southern Louisiana is favorable for growing fig trees for just this purpose. These recipes take advantage of this easily grown and found bounty.

To learn more about the fig in Louisiana, follow these links from the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center to learn more about Louisiana figs and how to grow them.

And of course… Bon appetit!

You can view this book and many others in our lovely Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room, Monday-Friday from 9-4:30.

Collection Spotlight: Kate Holmes Collection of Southern Stories and Poems

Kate Holmes was the daughter of a sea captain and a writer from New Orleans who produced poems and stories about New Orleans and Southern history. Her writings were published in both local newspapers and other Southern periodicals such as the Times- Picayune (New Orleans, LA), Dixie-Roto Magazine (New Orleans, LA), Cycle-Flame Poetry Magazine (San Angelo, TX), and Scimitar & Song Poetry Magazine (Sanford, NC). She died in New Orleans on March 10, 1975 at the age of 79.

The collection consists of twenty poems, three song lyrics, and eight newspaper articles written by Kate Holmes and published from 1947 through 1974.

“Camel-Back” Homes-1909

Lagniappe: The Camelback Shotgun is essentially a Shotgun single or a Shotgun double with a second story rising at the rear portion of the building. To read more about building types and architectural styles prevalent in New Orleans, click here!

To view the Kate Holmes Collection of Southern Stories and Poems visit Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Sewerage and Water…oh my!

SWB001

For those of us who live in Southeastern Louisiana, the sewerage and water system has been on our minds quite a bit recently. But let us hearken back to a time when our sewage systems were new and “thoroughly equipped.” In 1914, the Hon. Martin Behrman, mayor of New Orleans, presented “A History of Three Great Public Utilities: Sewerage, Water and Drainage, and their influence upon the Health and Progress of a Big City” to the Convention of League of American Municipalities. According to Behrman’s speech, it was “not until 1900 that New Orleans could be said to have a drainage system.” Until that time, there were no sewers, and open canals and water cisterns were breeding grounds for mosquitoes–and the deadly Yellow Fever. The Sewer and Water Board and the Drainage Commission was created in 1899 to develop New Orleans’ first sewage system, and by 1900 a substantial part of the system was in operation.

New Orleans Pumping Station 1909

New Orleans Pumping Station 1909; image from Wikimedia Commons

Behrman’s speech goes on to detail the increased property value and reduced death rate in New Orleans as a result of the new system. Ironically, a year to the day after Behrman’s speech, the 1915 New Orleans Hurricane made landfall near Grand Isle and put all of the systems operated by the Sewerage and Water Board to the test. A report given by Mr. George G. Earl, General Superintendent of the New Orleans Sewerage & Water Board, details failures by the pumping stations and recommendations for infrastructure improvements–including raising the levees.

Both reports have been transcribed in full and are available to read online:

A History of Three Great Public Utilities: Sewerage, Water and Drainage, and their influence upon the Health and Progress of a Big City

The Hurricane of Sept. 29th, 1915, and Subsequent Heavy Rainfalls

Both of these items are also available for viewing in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room on the third floor of Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

A.D. : New Orleans After the Deluge by Josh Neufeld

A.D. : New Orleans after the deluge

A.D. : New Orleans after the deluge

Neufeld, Josh. A.D. New Orleans After the Deluge. New York: Pantheon Books, 2009.
ISBN: 9780307378149.
Call Number: F379 .N553 A26 2009.

Sometimes pictures are more powerful than words. In the graphic novel A.D.: New Orleans After the Deluge, Neufeld tells the markedly different stories of seven Crescent City residents who survived Hurricane Katrina through vivid drawings and text.  Attempting to give a diverse picture of what New Orleanians experienced during the storm and its aftermath, the author follows the stories of people from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, some of whom evacuated before the storm, and some who stayed – whether for excitement, or because they had no other option.

This graphic novel gives the reader a look at some of what the media did not tell us about the storm: the camaraderie among the “refugees” at the superdome and stories of neighbors risking their own lives to save each other. For those who left, we see the painful homesickness they felt for their city after evacuating, and the even bigger devastation of returning to destroyed homes where everything was lost.  Within the intensity of the story, Neufeld does an incredible job showing the strength and resilience of the people of New Orleans.

Liz Cashman, Development and Outreach Coordinator