Posts Tagged ‘mardi gras’

Mardi Gras Coloring Pages

We promised more Mardi Gras-related #ColorOurCollections, and here they are! The following coloring pages are from our New Orleans Carnival Collection (previously blogged about here and here).

Comus_1878

Comus 1878 Invitation

 

Comus_1910_001

Comus 1910 Invitation, folded

 

Comus_1910_002

 

Comus 1910 Invitation, unfolded

 

 

MG-Calendar_1968_001

1968 Mardi Gras Calendar cover

Momus_1891_001

1891 Momus Invitation

Momus_1878_002

Momus 1878 Invitation

Proteus_1899_001

Proteus 1899 Invitation, Side A

Proteus_1899_002

Proteus 1899 Invitation, Side B

Our students have been coloring away! Here’s some of their handiwork:

Read more about #ColourOurCollections and find our previous coloring books here.

#ColorOurCollections

This week is #ColorOurCollections, a week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives has three coloring books available for you to download and print:

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Throughout the week, we’ll also be posting new coloring pages related to our Mardi Gras collections!

Above: Loyola University New Orleans graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks, from the University Photographs Collection. Click here to download.

Once you’ve colored your picture(s), share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

Click here for a list of other institutions participating in #ColorOurCollections to find even more coloring options.

More Mardi Gras archives

Looking for more historic Mardi Gras miscellany? Then check out our previous blog post about The Collection of New Orleans Miscellany which contains an invitation to the 1882 Independent Order of the Moon (I.O.O.M.) ball.

sca004_Miscellany

sca003_Miscellany

The blog post can be read in its entirety here, or come see us in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room to find out more about this collection.

Collection Spotlight: Carnival

It’s Mardi Gras season, meaning it’s the perfect time to highlight some of Special Collections & Archives’ Mardi Gras collections.

1899 Proteus Invitation

1899 Proteus Invitation

1899 Proteus Invitation, side 2

1899 Proteus Invitation, side 2

The New Orleans Carnival Collection is an artificial collection informally collected over time. New Orleans has been celebrating Mardi Gras since the mid 19th century. Private organizations, known as krewes, sponsor annual public parades and private balls. This collection consists of the ball programs and some invitations to these events produced by various krewes from the 1870s through to the 1970s.

1880 Comus admittance card

1880 Comus admittance card

While the collection contains materials related to Mardi Gras Super Krewes like Rex and Comus, it also contains ball miscellany from several historically black krewes.

1977 Original Illinois Club ball program

1977 Original Illinois Club ball program

1969 Young Men Illinois Club ball program

1969 Young Men Illinois Club ball program

The Original Illinois Club, formed by Pullman porters in 1894 in response to the whites-only krewes of New Orleans, was the first black carnival organization. The Young Men Illinois Club split from the Original and formed in 1927. The Illinois Clubs, along with the Beau Brummell Club, Plantation Revelers, and the Bunch Club, were created to sponsor traditional, invitation-only balls for presenting young black debutantes. Subsequent black krewes included the Capetowners (1935), the Plantation Revelers (1939),  the Dunbar Club (1946), and the Bon Temps (1947).

1970 Plantation Revelers ball program

1970 Plantation Revelers ball program

1970 Dunbar Club ball program

1970 Dunbar Club ball program

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970 Bon Temps ball program

1970 Bon Temps ball program

You can see more images from this collection in this previous blog post. For more information about the history of black New Orleanians and Mardi Gras, see New Orleans on parade : tourism and the transformation of the crescent cityThe Mardi Gras Indians : the ethnomusicology of black associations in New Orleans, The “Baby Dolls” : breaking the race and gender barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras tradition, Lords of misrule : Mardi Gras and the politics of race in New Orleans, and Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

This collection and the books listed above are available for research use in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room on the 3rd floor of the library Monday – Friday, 9am-4:30pm.

Welcome back, Wolf Pack!

Pictured above: Loyola University graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks

These photographs, along with over 6,700 others, are part of the Loyola University Photographs Collection and are available to view online through the Louisiana Digital Library.

Today as we welcome students back to campus, Carnival season is well underway!

Carnival season begins each year on January 6th, referred to as the Feast of Epiphany, Twelfth Night, or Three Kings Day. Mass consumption of King Cake and celebration ensues, culminating in Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday. This year, Mardi Gras will be celebrated on February 9th; however, the date of Mardi Gras varies from year to year based on the moveable date of Easter, but it is always 47 days preceding Easter on the day prior to Ash Wednesday.

For visitors and New Orleanians alike, Mardi Gras in New Orleans: An Illustrated History by Arthur Hardy, the gentleman revered as the authority on Carnival celebrations in New Orleans, provides an excellent place from which to start researching the festivities. Here in Special Collections & Archives, we invite you to delve into this text as well as our New Orleans Carnival Collection which preserves ball programs and invitations produced by various krewes from the 1870s through to the 1970s.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.