Posts Tagged ‘Loyola New Orleans’

The Loyola Lady

As Women’s History Month draws to a close, we reflect on the history of women at Loyola University with the 1962 issue of The Loyola Lady, a handbook for women students distributed by the university.

Loyola Lady Cover

You are 35% strong, co-eds. You compose 35% of the enrollment of Loyola University according to the 1961-62 enrollment figures. Today that figure has increased because more and more young ladies are coming to Loyola each year. When Loyola became a university, the Class of 1911 boasted a 32 student membership with one coed, Miss Lurline Wilson of Independence. The '61-'62 enrollment figures showed approximately 3,200 students from 33 states with 25 countries plus U.S. possessions. Today's registration will hoist that figure. A need for a handbook entirely on the feminine side was pointed out by the Dean of Women. This project was begun last year with a booklet entitled "The Wolfette," edited by Mary Ann Vial, Cathy Lund and Kathy Eberle. This year the booklet, "The Loyola Lady," is published with the sincere hope that it will help you to get to know Loyola and to become a part of this great institution of learning by contributing your very best to the excellent spirit of friendliness, cooperation and leadership that exists in the classrooms and on the campus of Loyola University.

Welcome, Loyola Lady. Welcome to the Loyola campus and sincere best wishes that the coming year will be marked with success in your academic, social, and personal life on the university level. To help you to know what is expected of and what is offered to the Loyola lady, we have prepared this handbook for you. Take a few moments of your time to read it carefully in order that you may become better acquainted with your Alma Mater. Rosalie Parrino, Dean of Women. "Takehold on instruction, leave it not, keep it, because it is thy life." Proverbs, Chapter 4, 13. Published by Loyola University, 1600 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana. Editor: Charmaine Currault.

While Loyola Lady is unsurprisingly outdated, it also highlights many of the activities and service activities women students engaged in in the 60s and encourages female students to participate in intramural sports.

For those of you who are would-be marksmen, there's an excellent rifle team which has competed in a number of state-wide tournaments. In the spring, the department is planning to have a swimming team. Needless to say, you do not have to be a great star to participate in these activities. Remember it's the spirit that counts. The Powder Puff Bowl, an annual even, will include a male "Sweetheart Court." Believe me, in this girls' football game, they come up with a few tricks the boys have never seen.

College Togs. Dress properly for every occasion. Clothing should play an important part in the college coeds plans for college. That is why it is necessary for you to realize how important it is to be properly dressed for every occasion. A first impression be a "good impress" if you dress properly. Things to bring to Loyola. 1. Sweaters and skirts (Bulk style popular).  2. Summer cottons (New Orleans weather is warm until November). 3. Loafers, flats and iby league saddles are worn to class 4. Raincoat or trench coat ( We do have our rainy season) 5. Heavy coat for dress purposes, short coat for sports wear or casual dress. 6. Cocktail dresses are used for evening receptions, semi-formals , operas or fraternity rush party dates. 7. Long formals are rarely worn. Semiformals are the vogue. 8. Drip-dry blouses. 9. Accessories: jewelry (small pearl earrings and necklaces are popular--too many rhinestones are not in good taste. Scarfs, gloves, purse (a small book size purse.) 10. Small handkerchief size veils or chapel caps are popular for week day Mass. A basic black, navy, or brown dress is always in good taste . 12. Opera pumps are always fashionable. 13. Bermuda shorts, slim jims, and a bathing suit.

Little Reminders That Help. The Loyola Lady is courteous at all times. Here are a few rules on introductions and such: 1. Young peopl are presented to older people, a man is presented to a woman, and a less important person is pre-sented to a more important one.  2. A student should introduce herself to faculty members or to guests of the University at any social function . 3. All invitations must be answered promptly. In replying always use plain stationery and black or blue-black ink. In a formal reply, use the third person, making no abbreviations, and writing out all numbers. This should be in the same form as the invitation. Remember that no reply is necessary when the name of a person to whom to send the reply is not given. 4. It is the hostess' privilege and duty to greet the chaperones, introduce them to one another, the students, and served to the chaperones before others are served.

Our University Archives contain images of female Wolfpack students engaging in a number of the activities detailed in The Loyola Lady including rifle practice, the Powder Puff game, attending mass, and hosting social functions.

Target practice

Target shooting team

Churchgoers receiving communion at the Mass of the Holy Ghost

Student in freshman beanie at Baccalaureate Mass

Students at a Dance, 1953

Women students eating

Women students in dorm

Women students cooking

Women students serving food

1965 Wolf Yearbook "Pumpkin Bowl"

1969 Wolf Yearbook Powder Puff

The Loyola Lady is available in the University Archives Vertical File in Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday, 9-4:30pm.

Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence, June 1887

Today, in celebration of Lafcadio Hearn’s birthday on June 27th,  we are highlighting pages 5-7 of Letter 24 from our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection. This collection primarily consists of letters written between the years 1840-1896 from Hearn to Page Mercer Baker, a New Orleans newspaper founder, reporter, and editor.

The Lafcadio Hearn was a reporter, writer, wanderer, and world traveler. Born in Greece, he spent a difficult childhood in Dublin Ireland, and England. Hearn then emigrated to the United States, living in Cincinnati, New York, and New Orleans, to eventually be laid to rest in Japan. He is a truly fascinating literary figure known not only for his writing about the underbelly of life, African American culture, Japanese ghost stories, and the macabre but also for his life spent as an outsider and traveler.

The letter was written in the month of June in 1887 days before he traveled from New York City to Trinidad aboard the Barracouta on an assignment for Harper’s Magazine. The resulting article “Midsummer Trip to The West Indies” appeared in the July 1888 issue of the magazine.

Hearn’s excitement for traveling south towards the climate of New Orleans is obvious as found in the prose of his letter:

“I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O.”

As the letter progresses, Hearn continues writing Baker, conjuring lands beyond his beloved city New Orleans and towards a new landscape that he will encounter as he travels further and closer to the lungs of the world:

“I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world….”

(Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence Collection, Letter 24, pages 5-7)

Below you will find a full transcription of these last 3 pages of the letter wherein Hearn writes to Baker of life and the transcendent qualities of light:

I am writing as usual in a hurry. One day more, Then South. I will pass you by again, and not see you, – but I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O. Then, a few days more and I shall be more than a thousand miles south of you. All the way the sky will deepen it’s blue. – I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world…. After all, I cannot say I feel glad at going. The sensation of belonging to nowhere, – of instability; – nothing solid or certain in life or work or effort, – always comes on one prior to seeking a strange latitude. You understand, as by some sudden revelation, what a monstrous whirl of dust and light all life is, and that you are but one atom of the eddy, – may be laid here, there, anywhere, – to rest a little, to struggle a little, or to shine a moment in the light; but sooner or later all the motes float into the darkness and the silence forever. Before, it will be some consolation to have seen what makes life and thought, – Light, in the most splendid aspect it can offer to human eyes.

Please don’t show my letter to anyone, outside Toledano and Prytania corner, – so that I can write to you just as I want

Always with love to you,

Lafcadio Hearn

Goodbye!

You can find this letter in its entirety along with others in our Digital Library or come and view the complete Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection in person Monday through Friday 9:00 – 4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Bonus Info: Follow these links to enjoy a fascinating 2-part radio documentary produced by RTE Lyric FM in Dublin, Ireland and learn more about Hearn’s life and work.

Collection Spotlight: 111th Anniversary of Hearn’s Death

Today is the 111th anniversary of the death of the indomitable Lafcadio Hearn.

In honor of this day, please checkout this prior post on our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence Collection.

This collection is housed in our Special Collections & Archives and available for your viewing Monday – Friday from 9:00-4:30.

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The Angolite: The Prison News Magazine

The Angolite is one of our most unique periodicals at Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives. Its uniqueness comes in part from the fact that the publication is inmate produced at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, LA.

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The Louisiana State Penitentiary AKA Angola (also known as “The Farm”) is the largest correctional facility in the United States by population and has the highest number of inmates with life sentences. It is a working farm, has a prison rodeo, a museum, and an inmate operated radio station KLSP. This publication covers the history of the Louisiana Prison System as well as internal events and programs, creative writing and poetry, outreach events, and initiatives to help the formerly incarcerated and families of those who are incarcerated.

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This award winning magazine is published bimonthly and can be viewed in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30.

If you are interested in learning more about Angola, there is a fascinating documentary called The Farm: Angola USA available for check out from Monroe Library.

Collection Spotlight: The Basil Thompson Papers

Basil Thompson (1892 – 1924) was born and raised in New Orleans and was a prominent literary figure in the city post World War I until his untimely death at the age of 31 from pneumonia. He was a published poet as well as an editor and founder of the small but influential New Orleans literary magazine, The Double Dealer.

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(Picture of Basil Thompson in 1908 2nd from left in the front row. Thompson graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola in 1910.)

Our Basil Thompson Papers collection housed in our Special Collections & Archives at Monroe Library offers insight into Basil’s literary career, his early childhood, and his family’s history. Through correspondence, personal diaries, scrapbooks, and ephemera, details of Thompson’s life emerge. The contents of this collection not only come from Basil Thompson’s hand but also from other family members such as his father New Orleans insurance man, T. P. Thompson, his mother Ida Marie Zorn Thompson, and grandfather Antoine Urban Zorn.

Postcards, letters, publications, diaries, journals, scrapbooks, and photographs flesh out this collection offering fascinating insight into the life and work of a well-known member of the New Orleans literary community and a family’s history.

Here are some images of one of Basil Thompson’s childhood scrapbooks (an analog version of a modern day Facebook or Tumblr page). These are filled with pictures of exotic locations, cards, ticket stubs, poetry, antidotes, and members of his favorite baseball team.

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(Images of one of Basil Thompson’s childhood scrapbooks from The Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4, Folder 4)

For further research on Thompson we also have some original issues of his The Double Dealer magazine as well as a 4-volume complete reprint available in our holdings in the Special Collections & Archives. This distinctive publication sought to establish literary legitimacy for the South (as directly motivated by H.L. Mencken’s scathing essay from 1917 on the culture of the South, “The Sahara of the Bozart”) while rooted in the unique character specific to the city of New Orleans.

Published in New Orleans on Baronne Street from 1921 to 1926, The Double Dealer was exceptional during its time not only due to its publication of women writers and African American writers, but also for its printing of modernism and experimental writers framed within a purposefully classical context. This balance bolstered The Double Dealer‘s intentions (as characterized by its subtitle) of being “A National Magazine From The South”.

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The Double Dealer was a significant part of the Southern Renaissance that occurred between the wars with a roster of contributors that include William Faulkner, Ezra Pound, Thornton Wilder, Sherwood Anderson, Djuna Barnes, Ernest Hemmingway, Robert Penn Warren, among many notable others. Its contributions to the literary culture of New Orleans can be traced to the creation of other magazines such as The Southern Review and The Outsider.

The Basil Thompson Papers and The Double Dealer are available for viewing in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Frankenstein Photos Found!

Today we take a look at a few interesting photographs we found while processing some of our University Archives images. These are from a drama department rehearsal for a production of Frankenstein in 1994.

The performance looks to have been a dynamic interpretation of the classic and fabled story written by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly in 1818.

I did some preliminary research and was unable to find if a particular play was used for the basis of this performance.

The physicality in these photos does indicate perhaps that the direction was informed by The Living Theater version first performed in 1965.

The Living Theater production was known for being created collectively by the performers as well as for its inventive staging using a large scaffold.

Do any of our former drama students, faculty, or alumni remember this production? If so, please let us know in the comments.

Remember to check out our Research Guide for Theater and Dance and feel free to come check out the Special Collections and Archives this summer from 9-4:30 Monday through Friday and if you would like to see more images of Loyola’s past please visit our Digital Archives 24 hours a day.