Posts Tagged ‘loynosca’

Letters from Iceland

It’s summer–what are your vacation plans? Perhaps a trip to chilly Iceland? For travel tips, look no further than W.H. Auden’s Letters From Iceland, previously detailed on the blog here.

Bon voyage!

#ColorOurCollections recap

Today ends #ColorOurCollections, but you can download our coloring books anytime.

Excerpts from Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: An introduction to the study of microscopic fungi

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Mardi Gras Coloring Book

Need some inspiration? Check out our students’ fantastic coloring!

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#ColorOurCollections Week with Identifying Microscopic Fungi

In celebration of #ColorOurCollections Week, we have been looking for some scans from the past that we thought might be fun to decolorize.

One such post from 2014 explores both a book and its author,  Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi.

We were initially impressed by the illustrations… but after being made curious and conducting a little research… we found a man with a truly fascinating life!

Mordecai was a busy guy!

M.C. Cooke did not have much in the way of a formal education but wrote hundreds of articles and books on botany and mycology. Collected roughly 46,000 specimens, contributed over 20 years of service to museum collections while editing journals and founding societies.

Here are the original color plates and the decolorized ones for #ColorOurCollections week:

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Good luck, students!

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As the library bustles this week with students preparing their final papers and studying for exams, we at SCA want to wish our undergrads the best of luck in these last few days before the holiday break. Feel free to study with us in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room — we are always happy to assist with your research needs!

Stay tuned for LOYNOOA

Stay tuned for an upcoming first-floor exhibit by the Special Collections & Archives team: “LOYNOOA: Loyola University and Opera in New Orleans.” In conjunction with “Encore! Encore! Bravi! Introducing the New Orleans Opera Association Archives” exhibit on view now in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library, we will soon be hanging numerous posters outlining the history of opera at Loyola. Thanks to extensive research conducted by student intern Gloria Cosenza, the exhibit will showcase notable alumni, instructors and events since the inception of the College of Music at Loyola University New Orleans. The show will be hung in the next week on the first floor of the library, across from the library’s music collections.

Before there was Street-View

Being a fan of travelling to new destinations but not being able to do so as often as I would like, I love being able to look at pictures of the places I wish to go.  Seeing places in a photograph allows you to imagine yourself seeing it in person for the first time, but with modern technology you can be right in front of that famous monument with just a click of a button thanks to developments such as Google’s Street-View option in their maps.

Although, in 1893 before the time of the internet, and back when travelling across the world was not as easily accessible, people relied on picture books such as Thomas Knox’s “Scenes from Every Land” to see the famous places they wished to travel. And those people who could not see these sites with their own eyes were exactly who this book was directed towards, as General Lee Wallace addresses in the introduction, “ To the few who have traveled; to the many who would like to go abroad, , but are restrained by timidity; to the lacking in funds; to the sick and convalescent who promise themselves sight of the world when health will permit; more especially, to the multitude of unfortunates, who, on account of incurable ailments of whatever kinds, can never hope to escape the narrow confines in which their lots are cast, I venture to address this introduction.”
Scenes From Every Land

This particular book holds over 500 pictures from around the world, from Syria to New Zealand and famous buildings to museum galleries, this book shows it all. But one thing that is interesting to wonder when flipping through the pages of this book is how many of these famous sites have changed since the late 1800s, and thanks to Google Street-View we are able to see just how different, if at all, things are. Just click the links below each picture to see how they are today.

Westminster Abbey, London

Westminster Abbey, London

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower, Paris

The Vatican, Rome

The Vatican, Rome

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The Colosseum, Rome

Leaning Tower of Pisa

The Campanile, or Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

Court of Lions in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain

Court of Lions in the Alhambra , Granada, Spain

St. Basil

St. Basil, the Beatified, Moscow

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Cleopatra's Needle, Alexandria, Egypt

Cleopatra’s Needle, New York

(The obelisk was originally in Alexandria, Egypt when this photo was taken but was later moved to Central Park in New York City in 1881)

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Washington Monument, Washington D.C.

Color Our Collections Week!

It is Color Our Collections week! A week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Organized by the New York Academy of Medicine and happening from February 1st through the 5th.

Follow this LINK to download, print, and color images from volume one of British zoologist John Gould’s publication The Birds of Great Britain.

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Once you’ve colored your picture(s) share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

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Today also happens to be the 135th anniversary of John Gould’s death. Gould was a British zoologist active throughout the mid-19th century and known chiefly for the over 3000 hand colored lithographs that he produced throughout his career. The first volume of The Birds of Great Britain, can be found in Special Collections & Archives at Loyola’s Monroe Library and online as part of our digital collections.

Follow these links to explore some of the other institutions participating in Color Our Collections Week and happy coloring!

See Also: More Libraries Participating in Color Our Collections Week

Found In The Archives: A Christmas Letter Recipe

Today we offer you a Christmas Letter we came across in our Anthony J. Stanonis Collection.

The Anthony J. Stanonis Collection contains correspondence, daily calendars, diaries, journals, pocket notebooks, photograph albums and scrapbooks related to travel, tourism and daily life as recorded by the creators of the items.  Albums and scrapbooks related to travel cover regional and cross-country trips in the United States, the Caribbean, and Europe by automobile, train, plane and boat. The date range of the collection spans from 1890 to 1987, but the bulk of the traveling ranges from the 1930s to the 1960s. All items were bought by Anthony J. Stanonis from eBay for academic research related to travel and tourism.

When you take holiday themed stationary

+ a pinch of foul language (and questionable grammar)

+ a hand drawn cartoon (and holly identified as spinach)

You get = A festive holiday letter between friends

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The letter reads:

Dear Duke,

You are sweet. So I want to wish you a Merry Christmas and the Happiest Damn New year you most ever had.

Howard

To look at this and other letters, scrapbooks, and travel diaries from the Stanonis Collection please visit the Special Collections and Archives Booth-Bricker Reading Room, Monday-Friday from 9:00-4:30.

The Complete Angler, Or Contemplative Man’s Recreation

Izaak Walton was a British Biographer and author most recognized for his work The Complete Angler, or Contemplative Man’s Recreation: Being A Discourse On Rivers, Fish-ponds, Fish, and Fishing.

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The book is written as a dialogue between an angler, Piscator, a hunter, Venator, and a falconer, Auceps. It also includes, quotations, poems, songs, as well as illustrations of country life, fishing, angling gear, and fish.

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This book is not a straightforward “how-to” manual but instead an example of seventeenth-century genera mixta (mixed genre), where Walton weaves the text together pulling from a myriad of traditions. There is also an element of political allegory running through, that can be concisely illustrated by the pun found between the words angler and Anglican.

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First published in 1653, Walton revised the work for over 25 years with five revised editions. We have his last edition which includes part two of the volume containing Charles Cotton’s fly-fishing and fly-making segment. Our copy was published in 1815 and is the second edition published by Samuel Bagster in London.

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Here is one of the songs, aptly titled The Angler’s Song. The song lyric is by Walton and was set to music by Henry Lawes (not to be confused with Longfellow’s poem of the same name).

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Click HERE to listen to a recording of the song on YouTube.

To check out this volume and other volumes from the seventeen-century, please visit the Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Two Words: Oriental Stucco

Today we look at one of our more unique titles from the stacks Oriental Stucco.

This book was published in 1924 by the United States Gypsum Company for use by architects as well as to market a new kind of stucco called… wait for it… Oriental Stucco!

This stucco was made with a “list of ingredients” including concrete and most likely gypsum (given the name of the company) and other materials “perfected by modern scientific knowledge” that we are not privy too, but one thing that stands out as told in the Forward is the inclusion of plastic.

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So what is so interesting about a book advertising different types of stucco?

The sample cards…
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Not only does the manufacturer give you the history and quality of the various stuccos documented in the book, they also give you textured and colored examples of what the product could achieve aesthetically. Pretty handy when trying to decide the kind of wall treatment you want for a structure and still informative today as an example of trade advertising from the 1920’s.

Now to peruse a few of the stucco types presented in the book…

We have Greek stucco…
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California Mission…
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The California Mission stucco sample has the roughest texture which seeks to evoke a style that resulted from the tools being wielded by “unskilled” hands and the use of  “course and rough” materials.

Here is a close-up… Look at all that texture!
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The most vivid color sample is the Early Italian… (though all of the stuccos where “made in white, and nine colors”)
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If you would like to come browse this relic of product advertising from the roaring 20′s feel free to visit the Special Collections & Archives in Monroe Library Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 or Friday, 9:00-12:00.

In the meantime here is a link to a more concise version that was published in 1925 that has been digitized over at the INTERNET ARCHIVE and included in their Building Technology Heritage Library.