Posts Tagged ‘loyno’

New Exhibit! Janet Mary Riley: A Voice for Social Justice in Louisiana

Come see our NEW exhibit on Loyola law professor, feminist, and social reformer Janet Mary Riley’s life and career.

The exhibit will be up through Spring of 2018 as part of the citywide NOLA4Women a citywide “series of more than 45 exhibits, performances, lectures, blogs and a new app [that] will shine a spotlight on the prominent role women played in creating the cultural, physical and social infrastructure of New Orleans.”

JMR_POSTER (1)

The exhibit is located in the Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room.

Stay tuned for more updates and events throughout the year!

New Student Orientation Is Happening!

New Student Orientation is happening on campus right now, and that means freshman are going through some familiar experiences:

photo

Moving in

Hanging out in the dorm


Buying books–and detergent


Checking mail


Hopefully, NOT getting hazed


Orientation

And an old tradition–the handing out of the freshman beanies.

Freshman beanies

You can view all these pictures and more in the Loyola University Photographs Collection on the Louisiana Digital Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

New Orleans Review Online

Special Collections & Archives at the Monroe Library hosts scanned back issues of the New Orleans Review, Loyola’s literary journal, in the Louisiana Digital Library. The NOR, for short, was started in 1968 by English department faculty Miller Williams, and has included advisory editors such as Joseph Fichter, S.J., and Walker Percy. In addition to the online collection, Special Collections & Archives also holds the NOR archive which includes correspondence, copy-edits, historical records, and more.

From the NOR website, authors published in the NOR include:

Walker Percy, Pablo Neruda, Ellen Gilchrist, Nelson Algren, Hunter S. Thompson, John Kennedy Toole, Richard Brautigan, Joyce Carol Oates, James Sallis, Jack Gilbert, Paul Hoover, Tess Gallagher, Sherman Alexie, Valerie Martin, Annie Dillard, Everette Maddox, Julio Cortazar, Gordon Lish, Robert Walser, Mark Halliday, Robert Olen Butler, Michael Harper, Angela Ball, Diane Wakoski, Dermot Bolger, Ernest J. Gaines, Roddy Doyle, William Kotzwinkle, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Arnost Lustig, Raymond Queneau, Yusef Komunyakaa, Michael Martone, Matthea Harvey, Bill Cotter, D.A. Powell, Rikki Ducornet, Ed Skoog, and many others.

Current issues of the New Orleans Review can be ordered through their website.

Happy National Nurses Week!

May 6–12 is National Nurses Week. In commemoration, here are images from Loyola nursing students and staff from the past.

Wondering when these photos were taken, or who’s in them? So are we! Leave a comment to help us identify them.

Nursing students with nun

Nursing students

1950s nursing students on Marquette Hall steps

1950s/1960s nursing students on park bench

2 nursing students setting up "February Heart Month" display

Nursing student getting a freshman beanie on the front steps of Marquette Hall

Student having her pulse taken by a nurse6

Dance of the Flyers AKA Voladores ‘Flying Men’

Today in celebration of Cinco De Mayo, we bring you an excerpt of the Mexican Jesuit Francesco Saverio Clavigero’s book, The history of Mexico. Collected from Spanish and Mexican historians, from manuscripts and ancient paintings of the Indians. Illustrated by Charts and other copper plates. To which are added, critical dissertations on the land, the animals, and inhabitants of Mexico.

This book is available for research M-F 9-4:30 and is part of our Archives & Special Collections as well as available electronically as part of the Internet Archive.

I chose to highlight pages 402 through 404 from Volume 1 that give a description of the mesoamerican ritual called the Dance of the Flyers AKA Pole Flying AKA Ceremony of the Voladores (Flying Men). The reason I chose to highlight this section is because I had the opportunity to see a performance of this ritual recently outside of the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City.

This dance has been awarded a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity distinction and is described as follows on their website:

“The ritual ceremony of the Voladores (‘flying men’) is a fertility dance performed by several ethnic groups in Mexico and Central America, especially the Totonac people in the eastern state of Veracruz, to express respect for and harmony with the natural and spiritual worlds. During the ceremony, four young men climb a wooden pole eighteen to forty metres high, freshly cut from the forest with the forgiveness of the mountain god. A fifth man, the Caporal, stands on a platform atop the pole, takes up his flute and small drum and plays songs dedicated to the sun, the four winds and each of the cardinal directions. After this invocation, the others fling themselves off the platform ‘into the void’. Tied to the platform with long ropes, they hang from it as it spins, twirling to mimic the motions of flight and gradually lowering themselves to the ground. Every variant of the dance brings to life the myth of the birth of the universe, so that the ritual ceremony of the Voladores expresses the worldview and values of the community, facilitates communication with the gods and invites prosperity. For the dancers themselves and the many others who participate in the spirituality of the ritual as observers, it encourages pride in and respect for one’s cultural heritage and identity.”

Here is part of Clavigero’s description of the ritual:

File_002

And the copper plate illustration of the ritual that faces page 4o2:

File_003

As an added bonus, here is a short video I shot on my phone while experiencing the performance in February:

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

mayday SCANs001mayday SCANs002

mayday SCANs003 mayday SCANs004

We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

Screen Shot 2017-03-21 at 3.26.57 PM

The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

Maroon

The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

Screen Shot 2017-03-21 at 3.23.11 PM

These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

American Chocolate Week: Walter Baker and Co.

Seeing as it is American Chocolate Week, we here at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives are offering a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones:

Collections Spotlight: Louisiana Women Writers Symposium Collection

In celebration of International Women’s Day, we are shining the spotlight on our Louisiana Women Writers Symposium Collection.

This collection primarily consists of correspondence and photographs from the Louisiana Women Writers Symposium that was held on September 19-20, 1986 at Loyola University New Orleans.

The symposium was funded by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and co-sponsored by Loyola University and the Women’s Studies Consortium of Louisiana. It was co-directed by Dorothy H. Brown and Barbara C. Ewell, who were faculty members of the English department of City College at Loyola University at the time.

IMG_0785

The symposium was held over a day and a half and featured sixteen scholars and moderators with a reading by writer Ellen Gilchrist.

 

IMG_0787

Ellen Gilchrist, Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives

 

Selected presentations from the conference were published with additional essays first in 1988 in New Orleans Review: Special Issue on Louisiana Women Writers, 15:1 (Spring 1988) and Louisiana State University Press in 1992 as a book entitled Louisiana Women Writers: New Essays and a Comprehensive Bibliography.

IMG_0784

The prologue to written for the dedicated issue of the New Orleans Review, does an amazing job at summarizing the significance of the conference, and the scholarship  and authorship presented there, “… the Consortium sought to dramatize through the symposium a critical otherness — another perspective on our past and present that purposely includes female, regional, black, ethnic, working-class, and other excluded minority points of view. It is the reinstatement of those “other” perspectives, which are essential to our cultural self-definitions, that women’s studies and the Consortium are committed.”

blog image prolo

Here is a little Library Lagniappe for you, a discussion on women writers from 1972 (the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement) between Helen Vendler, Nora Ephron, Elizabeth Janeway, and poet Carolyn Kizer, from 1972, hosted in New York City at the 92nd Street Y, Women Writers: Has Anything Changed?


Collection Spotlight: Norman Treigle Papers

In memoriam of the anniversary of Norman Treigle’s death on February 16th, 1975 we are spotlighting our Norman Treigle Papers collection.

Adanelle Wilfred (Norman) Treigle was born in New Orleans on March 6, 1927, the youngest of five children born to Wilfred and Claudia (Fischer) Treigle. His introduction to music was through his mother, who played both piano and organ, and his singing career began as a boy soprano in a church choir.

Determined to pursue a musical career, Treigle entered Loyola University where he studied with Elisabeth Wood for seven years. He won the New Orleans Opera House Auditions of the Air in 1947 and made his operatic debut with the company as the Duke of Verona in Roméo et Juliette. Over the next six years he developed a repertoire of twenty-two roles with the New Orleans Opera and studied both drama and ballet to prepare for his career as a singing actor. He sang solos at religious services of all denominations, performed with the New Orleans Pops and the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, and hosted a radio show on WWL. According to his daughter Phyllis, the proprietors of WWL suggested that he change his name from “Addie” to a more professional stage name, and after studying various names, Treigle finally chose “Norman,” the name previously bestowed on his son.

Although only 5’11” and 140 pounds, Treigle had a voice that belied his size and a dazzling acting ability. He was known for his dominating portrayals of Reverend Blitch in Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah, Grandpa Moss in Copland’s The Tender Land, Escamilio in Carmen and Mephistopheles in both Faust and Mephistofele as well the lead roles in Boris Gudonov, Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Gianni Schicchi. He and Beverly Sills often sang together in operas including Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Coq d’Or and Giulio Cesare that was produced to showcase Treigle in the City Opera’s premiere in new facilities at Lincoln Center in 1966.

Despite a vagabond career, he remained a New Orleanian. He and his second wife Linda lived near the lakefront with her daughter, Lisa, who Treigle adopted. His daughter Phyllis Susannah (born in 1961 and named after Phyllis Curtin, Treigle’s Susannah co-star) lived with her mother. He smoked constantly, drank Scotch, enjoyed wagering on the races at the New Orleans Fairgrounds, and was admired for his sense of humor and generosity.

On February 16, 1975, Treigle’s first wife, Loraine, found Treigle dead in his New Orleans apartment. The cause of death originally was thought to be result of a bleeding ulcer, but was later determined by the coroner to be an overdose of sleeping pills. Norman Treigle was forty-seven years old.

The Norman Treigle Papers consists of materials detailing the career and legacy of the opera singer. Press, programs, correspondence, contracts, photographs, costumes, and audio-visual materials are included in the collection. The bulk of the collection covers his years as a performer with some additional materials gathered after his death.

Treigle as Boito's Mefistofele

The collection is comprised of the following series:

Series I: Press & Programs

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Contracts, Royalties & Financial

Series IV: Public Relations & Memorial Fund

Series V: Sheet Music –  Subseries I: Opera Scores – Subseries II: Oratorios and Cantatas – Subseries III: Art Songs & Popular Songs

Series VI: Educational Resources

Series VII: Photographs

Series VIII: Brian Morgan Research Files

Series IX: Scrapbooks & Oversized Publications

Series X: Audio-Visual Materials – Subseries I: Moving Images – Subseries II: Audio

Series XI: Costumes

You can view and research the Norman Treigle Papers Monday through Friday from 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives of Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans.