Posts Tagged ‘loyno’

Collection Spotlight: Norman Treigle Papers

In memoriam of the anniversary of Norman Treigle’s death on February 16th, 1975 we are spotlighting our Norman Treigle Papers collection.

Adanelle Wilfred (Norman) Treigle was born in New Orleans on March 6, 1927, the youngest of five children born to Wilfred and Claudia (Fischer) Treigle. His introduction to music was through his mother, who played both piano and organ, and his singing career began as a boy soprano in a church choir.

Determined to pursue a musical career, Treigle entered Loyola University where he studied with Elisabeth Wood for seven years. He won the New Orleans Opera House Auditions of the Air in 1947 and made his operatic debut with the company as the Duke of Verona in Roméo et Juliette. Over the next six years he developed a repertoire of twenty-two roles with the New Orleans Opera and studied both drama and ballet to prepare for his career as a singing actor. He sang solos at religious services of all denominations, performed with the New Orleans Pops and the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, and hosted a radio show on WWL. According to his daughter Phyllis, the proprietors of WWL suggested that he change his name from “Addie” to a more professional stage name, and after studying various names, Treigle finally chose “Norman,” the name previously bestowed on his son.

Although only 5’11” and 140 pounds, Treigle had a voice that belied his size and a dazzling acting ability. He was known for his dominating portrayals of Reverend Blitch in Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah, Grandpa Moss in Copland’s The Tender Land, Escamilio in Carmen and Mephistopheles in both Faust and Mephistofele as well the lead roles in Boris Gudonov, Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Gianni Schicchi. He and Beverly Sills often sang together in operas including Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Coq d’Or and Giulio Cesare that was produced to showcase Treigle in the City Opera’s premiere in new facilities at Lincoln Center in 1966.

Despite a vagabond career, he remained a New Orleanian. He and his second wife Linda lived near the lakefront with her daughter, Lisa, who Treigle adopted. His daughter Phyllis Susannah (born in 1961 and named after Phyllis Curtin, Treigle’s Susannah co-star) lived with her mother. He smoked constantly, drank Scotch, enjoyed wagering on the races at the New Orleans Fairgrounds, and was admired for his sense of humor and generosity.

On February 16, 1975, Treigle’s first wife, Loraine, found Treigle dead in his New Orleans apartment. The cause of death originally was thought to be result of a bleeding ulcer, but was later determined by the coroner to be an overdose of sleeping pills. Norman Treigle was forty-seven years old.

The Norman Treigle Papers consists of materials detailing the career and legacy of the opera singer. Press, programs, correspondence, contracts, photographs, costumes, and audio-visual materials are included in the collection. The bulk of the collection covers his years as a performer with some additional materials gathered after his death.

Treigle as Boito's Mefistofele

The collection is comprised of the following series:

Series I: Press & Programs

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Contracts, Royalties & Financial

Series IV: Public Relations & Memorial Fund

Series V: Sheet Music –  Subseries I: Opera Scores – Subseries II: Oratorios and Cantatas – Subseries III: Art Songs & Popular Songs

Series VI: Educational Resources

Series VII: Photographs

Series VIII: Brian Morgan Research Files

Series IX: Scrapbooks & Oversized Publications

Series X: Audio-Visual Materials – Subseries I: Moving Images – Subseries II: Audio

Series XI: Costumes

You can view and research the Norman Treigle Papers Monday through Friday from 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives of Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans.

Happy Valentines Day! From LOYNO SCA!

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY!

Thompson, Basil. Childhood Scrapbook, circa 1900. Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4 Folder 4, Special Collections and Archives, Loyola University New Orleans. http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16313coll91, Louisiana Digital Library

Thompson, Basil. Childhood Scrapbook, circa 1900. Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4 Folder 4, Special Collections and Archives, Loyola University New Orleans. http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16313coll91, Louisiana Digital Library

Women’s March Archive at SCA

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HAPPY NATIONAL PIE DAY!

Celebrate National Pie Day via the Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council Cookbook.

A Book of favorite recipes, compiled by Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council, 1979.

A Book of favorite recipes, compiled by Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council.

Take a look at our TUMBLR for larger images of the recipe text, or view the book while visiting the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

#Feathursday

It’s #feathursday again! These ostriches can be found in the circa 1900 Basil Thompson Childhood Scrapbook in the Louisiana Digital Library.

World Day of the Snowman

It’s not often that we get to celebrate winter with a snowman, but these historic photographs from the University Photographs Collection show us Loyola students doing just that…

Happy snow day?

Sounds of New Orleans Opera

We’ve blogged previously about the newly processed New Orleans Opera Association Archives and our exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives many times now, but did you know you can also HEAR historic recordings of the New Orleans Opera?

Thanks to the generosity of the Center for Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Special Collections & Archives has recordings of excerpts from three NOOA performances available on Soundcloud and youtube:

These represent only a small fraction of the audiovisual materials available in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives. The collection contains ~500 reel-to-reels and ~100 visual media (VHS, Betacam, and more) that are in danger of deterioration. Contact archives@loyno.edu for more information about our digitization program.

Christmas at Loyola

It’s holiday season at Loyola! Enjoy these photos (some with a little embellishment from our resident gif-makers) of Christmas at Loyola in years past.

Marquette Christmas Lights

Students assembling nativity scene, 1959

Student Christmas choir, 1950s

Santa and children on a school bus, 1950s/1960s

1950s Christmas gathering

Santa "shhh"ing kids on Loyola of the South bus, 1950s/1960s

Children carol singing in manger, 1950s

Carol singing in the Marquette Hall horseshoe, 1950s

Snow at Marquette Hall manger

These photos and many more like them can be found in the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. And check out our many animated gifs on Giphy!

10,095 photos and counting!

Student worker Raven Evans (previously here) was hard at work last summer digitizing over 1,000 new images for the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. Here are some favorites…

Loyola alum Morgus the Magnificent (aka Sid Noel) thrilling some students in 1957

Balloons!

Students eating boiled crawfish

Student acrobats

Cracker Jack?

Loyola’s next alumnus?

These and many (MANY!) more like them can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Thank you to Raven for all of her hard work!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives: Estrays

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Today we take a glance at a thin volume of poetry. Estrays was first published in 1918 and then again edited and in hardcover in 1920. It is populated with poetry composed by the poets: Thomas Kennedy, George Steele SeymourVincent Starrett, and Basil Thompson.

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Below is a selection of a poem that that is both representative of the collections’ title and themes (estray : stray); The Quest, by Thomas Kennedy.

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You can browse either edition Monday – Friday from 9:00-4:30  in Booth-Bricker Reading Room inside the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.