Posts Tagged ‘Louisiana’

My Louisiana

Special Collections has a new item on the shelf! My Louisiana, with music by Henri Wehrmann and words by Russell McGuire, is one-half of a two-song set that was recently added to the archives.

The other side is a song named after our city.

To keep this item safe on the shelf, Special Collections & Archives Project Assistant Sara White made this enclosure for the item:

More information about Wehrmann, a noted engraver, musician, and teacher, can be found in this book. Wehrmann’s papers are also held by the Louisiana Research Collection at Tulane University.

To see this item, come visit us Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30 on the third floor of the Monroe Library in Special Collections & Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Maureen.

Louisiana Out-Of-Doors: A Handbook and Guide

Louisiana Out-of-Doors is an illustrated handbook of Louisiana natural history and outdoor recreation published in 1933.

Louisiana Out-Of-Doors

Fully indexed, it outlines all sorts of information and statistics including the geology of the state, outdoor activities, and locations listed with addresses, photos are scattered throughout (it even has a guide to poisonous snakes and snakebite treatments).

Map of Louisiana

Physiographic Map Of Louisiana

This handbook comes with a separate foldout map that has points of interest numbered for easy reference.

Features of Interest Map

One activity that is highlighted is fishing or angling, one of Louisiana’s favorite pastimes. Of course, crawfish (Crayfish) are of special interests, but fishing, in general, is also explored.

The Creole Crayfish Net

Louisiana Swamp Crayfish

Four Jacks

This is a great book to utilize when searching for recreational activities today as well as a great resource for researching the history of recreation and outdoors adventure in mid-twentieth century Louisiana.

Come check out this and other Louisiana naturalist books Monday-Friday in the Special Collections & Archives on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library.

And here us a little something extra, Dough Kershaw doing Louisiana Man:

Collection Spotlight: Ecology Center of Louisiana, Inc., Papers

The Ecology Center of Louisiana, a private, non-profit organization headquartered in New Orleans, collected and disseminated information on Louisiana’s environmental problems and emphasized public participation in resolution of those problems. The Ecology Center, most active between 1970 and 1983, was founded in 1969 around a kitchen table by a group of environmentally conscious citizens. Among them was J. Ross Vincent, a research chemical engineer from Wilmington, Delaware, who would go on to lead the Center for more than a decade.

Center services included a monthly newsletter, lectures and panel discussions on environmental subjects, assistance to schools and teachers in the development of environmental curricula, Louisiana’s first recycling program, an environmental library and hot-line, radio and television programs and lobbying of city, state and federal government representatives. Over time, the Ecology Center became an established resource called upon for expertise and guidance by environmentalists, politicians, business people, students and interested citizens.

Run by a board of directors made up of community members, the Ecology Center was assisted by a professional and volunteer staff and a Board of Advisors, which included the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, two U.S. Congressmen, an Assistant State Attorney General and various other government officials. During one of its busiest periods in early 1971, there were 146 people associated with the Ecology Center, including 131 paying members and 101 active volunteers. To fund its activities, the Center depended almost entirely on the support of its members and on private contributions from concerned citizens and businesses.

Issues and events on which the Center had an impact include limiting the use of the fire ant pesticide Mirex, the first Earth Day celebration in Louisiana, the implementation of the Federal Clean Air Act in Louisiana, public awareness of issues for the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, environmentally conscious urban planning, air pollution, construction of a deep draft oil terminal off of the Louisiana coast, the Waterford Nuclear Power Plant in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, public parks, water and air quality management, and regional transportation planning.

Scope and Content

The arrangement of the Ecology Center of Louisiana papers is largely based on the inventory of creator, J. Ross Vincent. However, a portion of the original subject files was integrated in the interest of cohesiveness. Papers document the activities of the Ecology Center through founding records, correspondence, articles and newsletters on environmental issues from its founding in 1969 until 1987 when J. Ross Vincent, the Center’s president and co-founder moved out of state. The predominant topics of conversation involve environmental issues affecting the state of Louisiana, the support for or opposition to environmental legislation and litigation, and the seeking or dispensing of environmental information.

Papers demonstrate that the Ecology Center was able to establish credibility with government agencies, the business community, organizations of concerned citizens and the public regarding environmental issues that directly affected the state of Louisiana and its inhabitants.

Other than general administrative papers and correspondence, papers are predominately divided by environmental subjects, including Air Pollution, Chemicals, Water Pollution and Coastal Zone Management, Land Use, Transportation, Solid Waste, Energy, Law and Litigation and Organizations, Conferences and Newsletters. Within each of the subjects, there is additional correspondence between the Ecology Center and concerned citizens, environmentalists and politicians. The collection includes information on a broad range of important environmental issues, as well as evidence of efforts by the Ecology Center and the impact of the Center to effect some change for the betterment of the environment.

Finally, the collection includes publications collected by and related to the organization.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: J. Gentil Papers

Jean Sylvain Gentil (1829-1911)*, a native of France and lifelong proponent of democratic principles, left his country in 1850 as a political exile following imprisonment and expulsion by Emperor Napoleon III. Gentil settled in Saint James Parish, Louisiana in 1853 and obtained a professorship of foreign languages at Jefferson College, a small Catholic school. Following the Civil War, Gentil continued his political activism by partnering with Armand Victor Romain to produce the weekly Le Louisianais. In 1881, Gentil sold Le Louisianais to André Roman and Paul Grima, who continued producing the newspaper until 1883. Gentil subsequently owned La Démocratie française of New Orleans and wrote articles for various other publications. In addition to political pieces, Gentil composed a great deal of poetry throughout his life.

The J. Gentil Papers consists of three handwritten documents, all of them in French. The leather-bound volume, titled “Chants de L’exil,” includes sixteen poems or songs. It is unclear if the entries are gathered or the original work of Gentil; entries list a geographic location and date. The other two documents, “Instruction et Avenir” and an untitled manuscript, refer to “College de la Louisiane” and “University de la Louisiane” respectively, suggesting the texts are commencement speeches.

Researchers can view the documents online here or request the original manuscripts by consulting with archives staff. Loyola University Special Collections & Archives is located on the third floor of Monroe Library and is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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*In his book Les écrits de langue française en Louisiane au XIXe siècle, Edward Larocque Tinker presents Gentil’s full name as Jean-Sylvain Gentil; however, Gentil signed himself “J. Gentil” or used one of his noms de plume, which included Jean Gribouille, J. Gringoire, J. Gueux, J. G. jardinier (or, jardinier louisianais), and Simplex.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.