Posts Tagged ‘library’

Library History Resources

In Special Collections & Archives, we have a lot of different materials about the history of Loyola, New Orleans, and the Jesuits, and many years worth of different university publications. However, we also have materials related to the history of the library itself, and many of those items have been digitized!

There are many digitized photographs of students in the old library (all c. 1950-1960):

All of those pictures can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Clicking on one of the photos above will bring you to that collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

There are also copies of library newsletters from 1983-2009. These newsletters were distributed primarily to students and faculty to highlight some of the resources and new technology in the Monroe library.

You can find these newsletters in the Loyola University Library History Collection. To view items from this collection in the Louisiana Digital Library, click on any of the images above. More digitized materials about the history of the library can be found in  the Maroon newspaper, the Wolf Yearbook, and the Bulletins.

While our digitized collections can be accessed 24/7, you can come visit us in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday through Friday, from 9am until 4:30pm.

This post was written by student worker Maureen.

#AskAnArchivist recap

Thank you to all who participated in last week’s event, #AskAnArchivist Day! A recap of Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives contribution to #AskAnArchivist Day is available here.

If you missed #AskAnArchivist Day, never fear! At Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, every day is #AskAnArchivist Day. If you have questions or concerns, we welcome you to contact our staff or visit the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

This digitized photograph and thousands like it belong to the Loyola University New Orleans Photographs Collection and are available to view online here.

Library Transformation

It’s National Library Week, and in Special Collections we’re taking a cue from our colleagues at the Othmer Library and using the theme of Transforming Libraries to show how our library buildings have transformed. For starters, the first library on campus was the Bobet Library in Marquette Hall.
BOBET LIBRARY, MARQUETTE HALL – 1913

  • Cost: $12,000
  • Size: 1,989 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 50,000
  • Architects: DeBuys, Churchill & Labouisse
  • Dedicated to: Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Bobet

Bobet Library, 1913

Construction of Marquette Hall was completed in 1912, and the Bobet Library on the 2nd floor was dedicated the following year. At the time of the construction of the Bobet Library, Albert Biever, S.J. (founder of Loyola) was president, and James J. O’Brien, S.J. became head librarian. An article published in The Daily Picayune on 13 July, 1913 entitled, “Old Treasures of Loyola’s New Library” stated: “Loyola in her new development is young and formative, but behind its growth is strength and in its development there is purpose…A tour of the university is delightful, but one would better not start from the library. It is a room to induce bibliomania – and the world might go by.”

MAIN LIBRARY – 1950

  • Cost: $800,000
  • Size: 36,711 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 250,000
  • Architects: Wogan, Bernard & De La Vergne
  • Dedicated to: Students & Alumni killed in WWII

Main Library, 1960s

Construction of the new library building commenced in 1947, and was situated between Bobet and Marquette Halls. Archbishop Joseph Francis Rummel delivered the dedicatory blessing upon completion of the building on Palm Sunday, 1950. The proceedings were aired by WWL-Radio. Students helped to move the books from Bobet Library to the new Main Library. A quote by poet Paul L. Callens, S.J inscribed over the Main Library entrance reads, “The monuments which learned men have built for us throughout the ages you will find accumulated in these books.”

Main Library construction

Main Library book display

Main Library

J. EDGAR AND LOUISE S. MONROE LIBRARY – 1999

  • Cost: $20,000,000
  • Size: 148,480 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 500,000
  • Architects: The Mathes Group
  • Dedicated to: J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe

Monroe Library, 2016

Groundbreaking ceremonies commenced in November 1996 for the new J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library by co-chairs of the capital campaign, Adelaide Wisdom Benjamin and Michael J. Rapier. Other university and community dignitaries assisted in the ceremony. Construction began that month, and continued through completion of the building in October 1998. Library faculty and staff worked with Covan movers to transport the collection from the Main Library to the Monroe Library. The new J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library opened its doors for patrons on January 11, 1999.

Monroe Library Computer Lab, 2003

Monroe Library Reference Desk, 2003

Monroe Library Learning Commons, 2008

Monroe Library Snowflake, 2008

More information about the library’s history can be found in our new Loyola University New Orleans Library History Collection.

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How have libraries transformed YOU?

Loeb Classical Library online has arrived!

Hundreds of our little red and green books are now available online.

They’re the Loeb Classical Library, with Greek and Latin texts from the Classical era face-to-face with English translations.  Published since 1911, these pocket sized books are the go-to source for original texts and English versions.  Perpetual access to these books has been purchased using the Bienvenue Classics endowment fund, honoring beloved Classics teacher Father Bienvenue, and established to add materials on Classical studies to our collection.  Features include single- and dual-language reading modes, annotation and bookmarking, a Greek keyboard for word entry, searching and browsing of all text, and every volume currently in print and all future additions.  All your favorites, like Sophocles, Euripides, Aristotle, both Plinys, St. Augustine, Euclid, Ovid, Strabo, Suetonius, Catullus, and many more are here!

You’ll find drama, mathematics, religion, natural history, ethics, philosophy: the whole array of thought on which Western Civilization was built. Having them online brings a whole new meaning to the medium of the “tablet!”