Posts Tagged ‘Found in the Archives’

Extract from the Reconstructed Constitution of the State of Louisiana

ReconstructedConstitution

“Extract from the Reconstructed Constitution of the State of Louisiana,” 1868, a slightly tattered treasure from our Collection of New Orleans Miscellany .

The seated man in the center of this document is Oscar Dunn, the first black lieutenant governor of the U.S. Senate elected in 1868. In the late 1800s, a monument in Dunn’s honor was slated to be erected in New Orleans, yet after his untimely and mysterious death, the monument was never created. You can listen to this man’s inspiring, yet tragic, story on this episode of “TriPod: New Orleans at 300.

Summer School – 1977!

As our students begin summer school this week, we take a look back to summer school…40 years ago.

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The summer of 1977 offered a plethora of classes to Loyola Students, as well as a robust offering of classes for the community in the City College division. Take a look at the Summer Bulletin here and enjoy these photos of campus from 1977.

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And make sure to check out Loyola’s campus in 1977!

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Knowledge of the World by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Knowledge of the World

Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Atlanta: Nexus Press, 1998.

(Edition of 200)

Knowledge of the World consists of 200 loose-leaf artist cards featuring color reproductions of work produced by prolific Ivorian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré (c. 1923-2014).

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy 383rd birthday, Samuel Pepys!

Samuel Pepys, an Englishman who rose to renown as a naval administrator and member of Parliament, is best-known not for his professional success but for a diary kept 1660-1669.

Everybody’s Pepys: The Diary of Samuel Pepys, 1660-1669 is a gem–perhaps the most important primary resource for the study of the English restoration period! The diary records the daily life of Pepys for nearly a decade and recounts major events including the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the Great Plague of London, and the Great Fire of London.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: Anthony J. Stanonis Collection

Anthony J. Stanonis received a B.A. in history from Loyola University New Orleans in 1997, then an M.A. in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2003, both in history, from Vanderbilt University. Stanonis’s research interests have centered on the cultural and economic implications of urban tourism. While researching the history of tourism in New Orleans for his dissertation, he acquired an assortment of artifacts generated by that city’s tourist industry. His research resulted in the publication of his book, Creating the Big Easy: New Orleans and the Emergence of Modern Tourism, 1918-1945, published in 2006 by the University of Georgia Press.

This collection comprises Stanonis’s personal acquisitions of materials pertaining to the New Orleans tourist industry. It includes guides, maps, brochures, books, and other literature put out by public and private groups and businesses, spanning roughly from 1902 to 1960.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#marbledmonday

Today’s selections include both marbled endpapers and book covers.

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Cover and endpapers from John L. Stoddard’s Lectures.

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Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott

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The Life and Death of John of Barneveld

Special Collections & Archives is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Marie Laveau: Voodoo Queen of New Orleans

When a devout Catholic becomes history’s most infamous practitioner of Voodoo, where does fact slip away and fiction reign? The life and legacy of Marie Laveau, immortalized as “Voodoo Queen of New Orleans,” is shrouded in mystery.

Portrait of Marie Laveau, Frank Schneider (after George Catlin), Louisiana State Museum

A skeptical Bill Murphy, writer for The Maroon Vol. 42 No. 11 (1966), briefly discusses Marie Laveau as both a historical figure and legendary character of New Orleans. The few known facts about Marie Laveau as provided by Murphy are as follows:

1. Marie Lavoux (as it was then written) was a free mulatto, born to the family of Charles Lavoux, at New Orleans, in 1794.

2. At the age of 15, she married a free mulatto carpenter named Jacques Paris. The marriage was preformed by the famous Pere Antoine on August 4, 1819.

3. The couple resided at a house in the 1900 block of North Rampart Street until the death of Paris in 1822.

4. Widowed, Laveau became a hairdresser to the wealthy women of New Orleans as a means of support.

5. In 1826 Laveau became the common-law wife of Captain Christopher Duminy Glapion, a free person of color and an officer in the Company of Men of San Domingo.

6. At the beginning of her second marriage, Laveau entered the Voodoo cult which already existed in New Orleans. By the time she was 32, she had assumed both the title and power of the city’s Voodoo Queen.

7. Laveau bore 15 children from her second marriage and lived with Glapion at their home on Saint Ann Street until his death in 1855.

For an in-depth look at Voodoo culture in New Orleans, peruse Robert Tallant’s Voodoo in New Orleans. Tallant, an author not swayed by outlandish rumors, dedicates a full 100 pages to Marie Laveau (and Marie Laveau II) in chapters as fantastically titled as “She Brought Them Gumbo and a Coffin” and “They All Danced Naked as Jaybirds.”

Voodoo in New Orleans endpaper

Marie Laveau has simultaneously terrified, inspired awe, and generally fascinated the public for nearly 2 centuries. Now 134 years after her death, the Voodoo practitioner holds a firm place in popular culture as the topic of chart-topping songs and basis of numerous fictional characters appearing in print and film, alike (most recently on American Horror Story: Coven).

Watch “Marie Laveau” by Bobby Bare on Youtube

Watch “Witch Queen of New Orleans” by Redbone on Youtube

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: Kate Holmes Collection of Southern Stories and Poems

Kate Holmes was the daughter of a sea captain and a writer from New Orleans who produced poems and stories about New Orleans and Southern history. Her writings were published in both local newspapers and other Southern periodicals such as the Times- Picayune (New Orleans, LA), Dixie-Roto Magazine (New Orleans, LA), Cycle-Flame Poetry Magazine (San Angelo, TX), and Scimitar & Song Poetry Magazine (Sanford, NC). She died in New Orleans on March 10, 1975 at the age of 79.

The collection consists of twenty poems, three song lyrics, and eight newspaper articles written by Kate Holmes and published from 1947 through 1974.

“Camel-Back” Homes-1909

Lagniappe: The Camelback Shotgun is essentially a Shotgun single or a Shotgun double with a second story rising at the rear portion of the building. To read more about building types and architectural styles prevalent in New Orleans, click here!

To view the Kate Holmes Collection of Southern Stories and Poems visit Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#marbledmonday

The above marbled endpapers are located (listed left to right, top to bottom) in Plutarch’s Lives in Eight VolumesThe Works of Thomas Carlyle in Thirty Volumes, The Novels of Jane Austen in Ten Volumes, and The Masterpieces of George Sand, Amandine Lucille Autore Dupin, Baroness Dudevant.

Special Collections & Archives is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Tiny texts, powerful prayers.

Today we glimpse into one of the smallest objects in Special Collections & Archives, a miniature volume measuring a mere 12 cm (4 13/16 in.). The devotional text entitled “Prières au saint sacrement de l’autel pour chaque semaine de l’année: avec des méditations sur divers psaumes de david” or “Eucharistic Prayers for Every Week of the Year with Meditations on Diverse Psalms of David,” was published in Tours, France in the year 1848.

The book contains four small, engraved illustrations, each measuring only 6.8 x 4.4 cm (2 11/16 x 1 3/4 in.).

Until approximately the 1870’s creating book illustrations required two steps: first, an artist produced a composition or design on paper; subsequently, an engraver transferred the desired picture to wood or cooper for printing. Therefore, beneath each illustration within the 1848 publication are the inscriptions “L. J. Hallez del.” and “A. Oleszczynski sc.” identifying Louis-Joseph Hallez, a French author and illustrator, as delineator or designer of the composition and Antoni Oleszczynski, a Polish engraver best known for his work as a portraitist, as sculptor, or in this case, engraver of the image.

Without further ado, below is a transcription of this week’s Eucharistic Prayer (as translated into English by Rachel Masters):

Week XXII

Only Son of God, who are one with your Heavenly Father, who want your disciples to be one with you, all formed of the same blood, who yourself have opted to unite with this blood, we present here the same earthly bread outside, the same heavenly bread within, so that you are in each of us, and each of us complete in you, and together a single body with you! Oh! How can you suffer amongst your brethren, amongst your children, even amongst your members, such fatal divisions? Sacrament of peace, sacrament of union, will you handle the matter of our wars and our discords? It is not just, Lord, that you descended from the cross to convert those who do not believe in you; their hardness is an obstacle to make them see your miracles. The miracle to do, Lord, for them and for us, is in their heart and in ours. Covert these hearts of stone into hearts of flesh, these hearts of flesh into hearts of spirit, and filled with your spirit, and then, Lord, we will worship you together at your alters and in your church, as your Angels worship you in heaven.

This and many other miniature books are available for viewing in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.