Posts Tagged ‘Archives’

World Day of the Snowman

It’s not often that we get to celebrate winter with a snowman, but these historic photographs from the University Photographs Collection show us Loyola students doing just that…

Happy snow day?

Gloria’s Top 5 archives picks

The Special Collections and Archives department at Monroe Library is a safe place for history according to literature, correspondence, and documentation. On Loyola’s campus, there are several galleries, and many individual buildings that display art and framed history on the walls in the hallways; but on the third floor of the Monroe Library is a condensed and magical museum of information. If my introduction has not enticed you to explore the archives, maybe my “Top 5 Favorite Collections in the Archives” list will.

5. Germany’s Wild Medicinal PlantsThis collection is digitized, but in order to view the actual book in its entirety, you can request to see it via the in person in Special Collections. It is a collection of antique illustrations of each wildflower and their medicinal properties. The images are beautiful.

Angelica_archangelica

4. The Samway Book Collection – Patrick Samway, S.J. has donated a large portion of his personal book collection to Special Collections & Archives. Made up of almost 3,000 books primarily by Southern writers, I find his particular collection of William Faulkner literature most interesting. On the shelves is at least one of every piece written by William Faulkner; but for most, there made be 6 to even 12 different editions. One title in several languages, print editions, different cover art, etc. For the right kind of person, this is an impressive and fascinating collection of Faulkner literature!

faulkner-mosquitos

3. The Marguerite Piazza Papers – A small collection donated by the family of Ms. Piazza, I discovered it while organizing the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit. Ms. Piazza graduated from Loyola in what we called the golden Age of Opera Education. She was one of the first to graduate from the Vocal Performance department in opera studies. However, her life after Loyola was lived among the stars of Hollywood. Known for her talents as a vocalist, dancer, and actress she was stunningly beautiful and very popular. Her personal life was just as interesting. While going through her collection, it’s easy to get lost in her story (previously blogged here).

Piazza aboard American Airlines flight to Memphis after receiving the "Golden Stocking Award" from the hosiery industry for having the most glamorous legs in American, 1956.

2. John Kennedy Toole Manuscript – Yes, this is one of the Toole’s manuscripts – wrapped in a beautiful archive safe box and tied with a brown piece of yarn. There is no definitive “first manuscript” for A Confederacy of Dunces. However, this manuscript was, “donated by Lyn Hill Hayward, a longtime friend of Walker Percy’s, and described by her as the manuscript given Percy by Thelma Toole”.

1. First Edition Copy of Sylvia Plath’s Ariel – Sylvia Plath’s posthumous Ariel was initially published in 1966. This printing is part of the Robert Giroux Collection. Giroux was vice president and partner of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., and his book collection contains many first editions and signed copies of works by 20th century American writers.

Plath_Ariel_1

Posted by student worker Gloria S. Cosenza

On This Day in 1884, Cotton Centennial

The World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-85

December 16, 1884 marked the opening day of The World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition. The Cotton Planter’s Association chose to commemorate the first recorded shipment of cotton from the United States to England, which happened in 1784, at the World’s Fair that year in New Orleans.

Special Collections & Archives has several books commemorating the Exposition. The World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-85 describes the opening ceremony and exhibits in the fair. Each state in the U.S. (of which there were 38 at the time), the 7 territories (Arizona, Dakota, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Washington, Wyoming), and 17 foreign nations (of which the Mexico exhibit was particularly lauded) had its own exhibit, and there were also dedicated  exhibits on the government, education, women, people of color, the railway, horticulture, art, and livestock.

Catalogue of the art collection describes the art on display at the exhibition and includes prices.

Finally, Map of the city of New Orleans showing location of exposition grounds and all approaches thereto by land & water shows the exhibition’s locations around the city as well as drawings of some of the exhibition buildings. Special Collections & Archives’ copies are very fragile, but the map is digitized and available online in David Rumsey’s Map Collection, Harvard University’s Digital Maps Collection, the University of Milwaukee’s American Geographical Society Library – Maps Collection, and Wikimedia Commons (shown below). Most of the exhibition took place in what is now Audubon Park.

There are many more items related to the Cotton Centennial in the Louisiana Digital Library, including LSU’s  New Orleans Centennial Exposition Stereoscopic Views collection.

A Louisiana "Swamp Angel," G. & S. Building, from New Orleans Centennial Exposition Stereoscopic Views, LOUISiana Digital Library, Baton Rouge, La.

You can view the three books detailed above in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives, Monroe Library, Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm.

Christmas at Loyola

It’s holiday season at Loyola! Enjoy these photos (some with a little embellishment from our resident gif-makers) of Christmas at Loyola in years past.

Marquette Christmas Lights

Students assembling nativity scene, 1959

Student Christmas choir, 1950s

Santa and children on a school bus, 1950s/1960s

1950s Christmas gathering

Santa "shhh"ing kids on Loyola of the South bus, 1950s/1960s

Children carol singing in manger, 1950s

Carol singing in the Marquette Hall horseshoe, 1950s

Snow at Marquette Hall manger

These photos and many more like them can be found in the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. And check out our many animated gifs on Giphy!

Monroe Library says “relax”

Need a break from studying and writing papers? Come to the Relaxation Station on the first floor of the Monroe Library to color or do puzzles. By concentrating on a creative and challenging task for just 15 minutes, your mind is temporarily removed from the stress of essays and exams.

Relaxation Station sign

partially colored wildflowers book

completed coloring pages of birds

partially colored birds book

The Relaxation Station is on your immediate left when you come in the front entrance of the library.

Want to setup your own Relaxation Station at home? Special Collections & Archives and Marketing & Communications both have coloring books available for you to download and print:

Color Your Way to Loyola

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Madama Butterfly

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nooa_00140015

If you were bored 54 years ago, you could have gone and seen Madama Butterfly at the New Orleans Opera this time of year! It’s an Italian opera centered around romance and honor. The synopsis from this website is posted below,

“This tragic tale revolves around the young Japanese geisha, Butterfly. She is to be married to Pinkerton, an American Officer on assignment in Nagasaki. Butterfly is young and naive, and fully believes her marriage to Pinkerton to be true and everlasting, while Pinkerton intends on marrying an American when he returns home. Butterfly waits for Pinkerton to return, having had a child by him that he does not know about. He returns, but with his new American wife, intending to take the child back to America. Rather than live in shame, Butterfly agrees to give up her child, but intends to kill herself out of honor. She kills herself to save the honor of her family, and for love.”

The last performance by the New Orleans Opera was in 2013, so it is quite possible to see it once again on their stage in the future. Even though it isn’t playing now, you should still check out the New Orleans Opera, because they have a bunch of amazing performances coming up.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1964, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

Happy holidays!

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.

10,095 photos and counting!

Student worker Raven Evans (previously here) was hard at work last summer digitizing over 1,000 new images for the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. Here are some favorites…

Loyola alum Morgus the Magnificent (aka Sid Noel) thrilling some students in 1957

Balloons!

Students eating boiled crawfish

Student acrobats

Cracker Jack?

Loyola’s next alumnus?

These and many (MANY!) more like them can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Thank you to Raven for all of her hard work!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

My Louisiana

Special Collections has a new item on the shelf! My Louisiana, with music by Henri Wehrmann and words by Russell McGuire, is one-half of a two-song set that was recently added to the archives.

The other side is a song named after our city.

To keep this item safe on the shelf, Special Collections & Archives Project Assistant Sara White made this enclosure for the item:

More information about Wehrmann, a noted engraver, musician, and teacher, can be found in this book. Wehrmann’s papers are also held by the Louisiana Research Collection at Tulane University.

To see this item, come visit us Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30 on the third floor of the Monroe Library in Special Collections & Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Maureen.

Happy Halloween!

To celebrate, check out a “Haunting Note” (above) from the October 30, 1981 issue of The Maroon.

Each year, the Loyola University New Orleans Maroon features fun, spook-tacular articles surrounding Halloween on campus and in the Crescent City.

Another holiday remembered by the Loyola Maroon is All Saints’ Day.

This article from the October 28, 1994 Maroon explains why All Saints’ Day is so important and reminds students to remember the Holiday amidst all of the Halloween celebrations.

In 2001, the Maroon published an article on the lighter side of Halloween and All Saints’ Day.

However you plan to spend your Halloween and All Saints’ Day,

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives would like to wish you a Happy Halloween!

Posted by student worker Samantha

#PageFrights

Today’s #pagefrights is this ferocious looking wolf (or is it a werewolf!?) from the 1949 Wolf yearbook.

#PageFrights is a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.