Posts Tagged ‘Archives’

1963 New Orleans Freedom March

As we continue to celebrate Black History Month, the following images (previously blogged about here) highlight the September 30, 1963 Freedom March in New Orleans.

While lunch counters and department stores had begun to desegregate in New Orleans by the summer of 1963, public administration had not yet implemented wide-spread desegregation efforts. On August 9, 1963, New Orleans Mayor Victor Schiro signed an agreement to desegregate public buildings, including City Hall; begin hiring qualified blacks for city positions; and cease appealing court desegregation orders or harassing businesses that were in the process of desegregating. However, only portions of the agreement were actually implemented, and on September 30, more than 10,000 whites and blacks marched from Shakespeare Park (now A.L. Davis Park) to City Hall to present the “Petition to the Greater New Orleans Community” demanding the realization of the August 9 agreement and other directives. The Mayor and other white politicians refused to meet with the protesters, so a week later, Reverend A.L. Davis presented the petition to City Council. Protests and demonstrations continued in New Orleans throughout the fall and winter of 1963, with City Hall’s cafeteria finally being desegregated shortly thereafter.

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Don Hubbard at left.

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At left Revius Ortique and Father Twomey.

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Left to right: unidentified, Rev. Avery Alexander, Solis Elie (foreground), Rev. A.L. Davis.

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Left to right (foreground): Father Twomey, Solis Elie , Ernest Morial.  Also featured in image – Rev. A.L. Davis and Rev. Avery Alexander.

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Left to right (foreground): Dr. Leonard Burns, Oretha Castle Haley, & Revius Ortique.

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Msgr. Charles Plauche.

These photos, taken by B. Raynal Ariatti, are from the Louis J. Twomey S.J. Papers and the B. Raynal Arriati Papers, and were previously on exhibit in Special Collections & Archives Booth-Bricker Reading Room as part of the exhibit We March in Dignity. These images and many more like them are available for research in Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

Black History Month and opera

The New Orleans Opera has had the privilege of performing with some of the most talented and accomplished opera singers in the world, including a number of black opera singers. In conjunction with Black History Month, following are a few of the illustrious singers of color who have performed with the NOOA.

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Native New Orleanian Shirley Verrett (pictured here in a 1983 NOOA performance of Tosca) filled in as Carmen for the NOOA in 1980, making her the first black singer to perform the role with NOOA. She had previously been the first black singer to perform the role at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow.

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Bass-baritone Alfred Walker has become an international superstar since he graduated from Loyola’s master’s program in 1996. Walker won the Regional Metropolitan Opera Council Audition and made his Metropolitan Opera debut as Grégorio in Roméo et Juliette in 1998. He has performed with NOOA in Macbeth and Elektra (1994); Madama Butterfly (1995); Andrea Chénier (1996); Rigoletto (1997); and La Bohème (2014). He is pictured above in Loyola’s 1996 performance of Die Fledermaus.

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Another Loyola alum, Giovanna Joseph, has performed supporting roles in Salome and Porgy and Bess with NOOA. In 2011, Joseph founded Opera Creole, a nonprofit company dedicated to discovering and performing music written by nineteenth century New Orleans Creole men and women of color. She is pictured above (left) with her daughter Aria Mason (right) and singer Hope Briggs (middle) in NOOA’s 2010 Porgy and Bess; this performance marks the first time a mother and daughter both had singing roles in the same NOOA production (image courtesy of Givonna Joseph).

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Mezzo-soprano Débria Brown was another trailblazing New Orleans native who battled prejudice to become an international opera star. Brown graduated from Xavier University and began her professional career with the New York City Opera opposite Loyola alum and fellow New Orleanian Norman Treigle. She later achieved success singing in Germany and Vienna before becoming a professor of voice at the University of Houston Moores School of Music. Brown performed with NOOA in Un Ballo in Maschera (pictured above in 1981) and Eugene Onegin (1995).

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Opera soprano Marquita Lister performed two of her signature roles in Porgy and Bess and Salome with NOOA in 2002. Lister has also served as the national spokesperson for the Negro “Spiritual” Scholarship Foundation.

A large portion of the New Orleans Opera Association Archives are Artists’ Files. These include head shots, press kits, and correspondence, in many cases sent by artist management companies, for artists who performed with NOOA as well as many who didn’t. These files contain beautiful graphic materials for  some of the most famous opera singers of the 20th century, including many of the world’s leading black singers.

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LaVergne Monette

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Barbara Hendricks

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Simon Estes

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Barbara Conrad

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Vinson Cole

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Grace Bumbry

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Betty Allen

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Donnie Ray Albert

Many if not all of these singers faced intense racial prejudice in establishing the rights of black singers to perform with regional, national, and international opera companies. Alison Kinney’s “As the Met Abandons Blackface, a Look at the Legacy of African Americans in Opera” details struggles faced by black American opera singers as well as the use of white singers to portray black characters, as does Naomi Adele André’s Blackness in Opera (available for checkout from the Monroe Library).

The materials pictured above, and many more like them, are available for research in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives at Special Collections & Archives‘ Booth-Bricker Reading Room Monday – Friday from 9am-4:30pm.

A Night at the Opera

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On February 10th, at around 7:30 p.m., I walked into the Mahalia Jackson Theater. I gave the staff my ticket, and walked in. It seemed a little bland at first, but I got a a soda at the bar and made my way to my seat. It was in the center, in the middle of the large auditorium, so it was perfect. They called for the start at 7:55, and then, the curtains rose at around 8:10 after announcements. That’s when a man hobbled to the center of the stage, and started to break out into song about a demon barber.

The New Orleans Opera Association performed Sweeney Todd last weekend, and I had the chance to go see it. After scanning the pamphlets for months, I must admit, I was curious to see the opera for myself.

Although they missed out a chance to make it a dinner theater, it was still amazing. The voices were extremely talented, the set was wonderful, and how they managed to make blood spurt 10 feet into the air still confuses me. If anyone is not familiar with the story, I apologize. It is exactly what it sounds like. The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Sweeney Todd, slit throats with a razor in order to fulfill his thirst for revenge. They inconspicuously managed to put a device on the victims and make blood spurt, even getting some on the orchestra, before making the chair seat drop and the body fell through the floor and into the basement, where they were ground up for meat pies. That thankfully was just props.  The show totaled up to 3 hours, with a 20 minute intermission, and it was 11 when I got out. Even though I was absolutely tired, ready to peel my makeup off and curl up in some blankets, I had such a wonderful time.

For anyone that hasn’t gone to see the New Orleans Opera, I highly recommend you go. They’re currently in their 74th year, so if there’s any year that you should go, it’s the next. They have numerous performances planned until then, so if you want to have a night of pure talent and have your mind blown, give them a visit!

We also have an exhibit on the New Orleans Opera Association in Special Collections & Archives and  pamphlets in our digital collections if you are curious to learn about their history.

-This blog was written by student worker Miranda

#ColorOurCollections recap

Today ends #ColorOurCollections, but you can download our coloring books anytime.

Excerpts from Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: An introduction to the study of microscopic fungi

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Mardi Gras Coloring Book

Need some inspiration? Check out our students’ fantastic coloring!

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Protests Throughout Loyola’s History

Loyola University New Orleans is no stranger to the idea of protests. Over the years, students have participated in protests on campus, in New Orleans, and even in Washington, D.C. There have even been a few protests against Loyola at times.

In 2001, in the wake of 9/11, a group of Loyola students traveled to Washington D.C. (pictured above) “to represent Louisiana in an anti-war rally.” The editorial piece comments on – but is “neither condemning nor condoning” – the irony that the protesters were speaking against both the government and the United States as a whole, yet were seeking to prove how the attacks on September 11th had inspired the citizens to embrace patriotism.

Again in 2002, Loyola Law Professor William Quigley joined a small group of protesters on St. Charles Avenue against the “looming war on Iraq” shortly after returning from a trip to Iraq with the organization Voices in the Wilderness. He then had a panel discussing his trip and is quoted saying, “Seeing these people, I saw they are just like us.” He said that many of the people he spoke with on his trip were fearful of the upcoming war with the U.S.

Also in 2002, a group of about 100 protesters congregated outside of the Loyola University Law School campus to express their disapproval of Loyola’s invitation to Kim Gandy to speak on campus. Gandy, an alum of the Law School, was president of the National Organization for Women at the time and was vocal about her pro-choice stance on abortion.

In 2011, three Loyola students made their way to Washington D.C. to participate in the March for Life (pictured above). The Loyola Maroon newspaper featured an article voicing opinions of students on both sides of the issue. Margaret Liederbach was pro-life, but had some issues with parts of the movement as a whole, stating, “By restricting the movement to a religious – and primarily Christian context, we lose sight of the fundamental humanitarian issue at hand.” Ashley Nesbitt and Tori Buckley who take the pro-choice stance said, “The reasons a woman might choose abortion are endless; regardless, it is unfair for a single individual to decide whether abortion is the right decision for other women.”

Most recently, on January 21, 2017, people from all over the nation came together in Washington D.C. to protest President Donald Trump on the day after his inauguration. Several students from Loyola made the trip to participate in the Women’s March on Washington. The Loyola Maroon also published an opinion piece written by one of the students in attendance at the march, and Special Collections & Archives is collecting march-related materials.

These are just some of the times Loyola has been involved in protests, whether locally or nationally, throughout its history.

Written by student worker Samantha.

Mardi Gras Coloring Pages

We promised more Mardi Gras-related #ColorOurCollections, and here they are! The following coloring pages are from our New Orleans Carnival Collection (previously blogged about here and here).

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Comus 1878 Invitation

 

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Comus 1910 Invitation, folded

 

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Comus 1910 Invitation, unfolded

 

 

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1968 Mardi Gras Calendar cover

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1891 Momus Invitation

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Momus 1878 Invitation

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Proteus 1899 Invitation, Side A

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Proteus 1899 Invitation, Side B

Our students have been coloring away! Here’s some of their handiwork:

Read more about #ColourOurCollections and find our previous coloring books here.

#ColorOurCollections

This week is #ColorOurCollections, a week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives has three coloring books available for you to download and print:

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Throughout the week, we’ll also be posting new coloring pages related to our Mardi Gras collections!

Above: Loyola University New Orleans graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks, from the University Photographs Collection. Click here to download.

Once you’ve colored your picture(s), share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

Click here for a list of other institutions participating in #ColorOurCollections to find even more coloring options.

Photos of the Danna Center

I digitized about 100 photos from the Department of Student Involvement as my first project as a Special Collections intern. Here is a small sample of some of them.

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This Photo depicts a bar and restaurant that existed when my mom went to Loyola located at the current spot of Satchmo’s.

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This Photograph depicts what the cafeteria in the Danna Center used to look like over 30 years ago.

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This photograph depicts a former dessert shop in the Danna Center.

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This photograph depicts what used to be in the spot of the One Loyola Room right in front of the bookstore.

Blog by Student Intern Benjamin.

World Day of the Snowman

It’s not often that we get to celebrate winter with a snowman, but these historic photographs from the University Photographs Collection show us Loyola students doing just that…

Happy snow day?

Gloria’s Top 5 archives picks

The Special Collections and Archives department at Monroe Library is a safe place for history according to literature, correspondence, and documentation. On Loyola’s campus, there are several galleries, and many individual buildings that display art and framed history on the walls in the hallways; but on the third floor of the Monroe Library is a condensed and magical museum of information. If my introduction has not enticed you to explore the archives, maybe my “Top 5 Favorite Collections in the Archives” list will.

5. Germany’s Wild Medicinal PlantsThis collection is digitized, but in order to view the actual book in its entirety, you can request to see it via the in person in Special Collections. It is a collection of antique illustrations of each wildflower and their medicinal properties. The images are beautiful.

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4. The Samway Book Collection – Patrick Samway, S.J. has donated a large portion of his personal book collection to Special Collections & Archives. Made up of almost 3,000 books primarily by Southern writers, I find his particular collection of William Faulkner literature most interesting. On the shelves is at least one of every piece written by William Faulkner; but for most, there made be 6 to even 12 different editions. One title in several languages, print editions, different cover art, etc. For the right kind of person, this is an impressive and fascinating collection of Faulkner literature!

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3. The Marguerite Piazza Papers – A small collection donated by the family of Ms. Piazza, I discovered it while organizing the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit. Ms. Piazza graduated from Loyola in what we called the golden Age of Opera Education. She was one of the first to graduate from the Vocal Performance department in opera studies. However, her life after Loyola was lived among the stars of Hollywood. Known for her talents as a vocalist, dancer, and actress she was stunningly beautiful and very popular. Her personal life was just as interesting. While going through her collection, it’s easy to get lost in her story (previously blogged here).

Piazza aboard American Airlines flight to Memphis after receiving the "Golden Stocking Award" from the hosiery industry for having the most glamorous legs in American, 1956.

2. John Kennedy Toole Manuscript – Yes, this is one of the Toole’s manuscripts – wrapped in a beautiful archive safe box and tied with a brown piece of yarn. There is no definitive “first manuscript” for A Confederacy of Dunces. However, this manuscript was, “donated by Lyn Hill Hayward, a longtime friend of Walker Percy’s, and described by her as the manuscript given Percy by Thelma Toole”.

1. First Edition Copy of Sylvia Plath’s Ariel – Sylvia Plath’s posthumous Ariel was initially published in 1966. This printing is part of the Robert Giroux Collection. Giroux was vice president and partner of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., and his book collection contains many first editions and signed copies of works by 20th century American writers.

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Posted by student worker Gloria S. Cosenza