Posts Tagged ‘Archives’

Knowledge of the World by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Knowledge of the World

Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Atlanta: Nexus Press, 1998.

(Edition of 200)

Knowledge of the World consists of 200 loose-leaf artist cards featuring color reproductions of work produced by prolific Ivorian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré (c. 1923-2014).

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

SCA on the Graham Norton Show

You never know who is going to want to use Special Collections & Archives materials. Last week we were contacted by a researcher for the Graham Norton Show about using an image from our digitized pamphlet Florence Foster Jenkins: An Appreciation (previously blogged about here). Jenkins is the subject of an upcoming film starring Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant, and the Graham Norton Show used an image from our digitized pamphlet in their interview with Streep. Watch the clip and see the image below:

The interview aired last Friday, April 15.

We’re always excited to find out who is using our collections–thanks to the Graham Norton Show for reaching out to us!

Collection Spotlight: Marguerite Piazza Papers

Marguerite Piazza program

A native of New Orleans, Marguerite Piazza graduated from Loyola University with a bachelor’s degree in music in June 1940. She then attended graduate school in music at Louisiana State University. Following university study, Piazza began her career as a professional singer. Much of her early work, roughly from the mid-1940s to the early 1950s, was as an opera soprano. Her performances included stints with the New York City Opera and with the Metropolitan Opera Company. Afterwards she performed in television, especially on NBC’s Show of Shows, in theater, night clubs, and in other forms of entertainment.

The Marguerite Piazza Papers roughly cover the years 1939 and 1974, with the majority of content from 1945-1960. They are arranged into two series based on types of material: Programs and Playbills and Photographs. Each series is then arranged chronologically. These programs and photographs document Marguerite Piazza’s singing career throughout the United States in operas, musicals, television, nightclubs, and other performance venues.

Click here to view the full finding aid for the Marguerite Piazza Papers.

Marguerite Piazza program, 1952

Marguerite Piazza program, 1952

Marguerite Piazza program

Marguerite Piazza in "Happy As Larry" on Broadway with Burgess Meredith (also director), 1950

Piazza aboard American Airlines flight to Memphis after receiving the "Golden Stocking Award" from the hosiery industry for having the most glamorous legs in American, 1956.

The Marguerite Piazza Papers are available for research in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

Bonus: Piazza on Your Show of Shows, 1950:

And on the Dean Martin Variety Show in 1966:

Library Transformation

It’s National Library Week, and in Special Collections we’re taking a cue from our colleagues at the Othmer Library and using the theme of Transforming Libraries to show how our library buildings have transformed. For starters, the first library on campus was the Bobet Library in Marquette Hall.
BOBET LIBRARY, MARQUETTE HALL – 1913

  • Cost: $12,000
  • Size: 1,989 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 50,000
  • Architects: DeBuys, Churchill & Labouisse
  • Dedicated to: Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Bobet

Bobet Library, 1913

Construction of Marquette Hall was completed in 1912, and the Bobet Library on the 2nd floor was dedicated the following year. At the time of the construction of the Bobet Library, Albert Biever, S.J. (founder of Loyola) was president, and James J. O’Brien, S.J. became head librarian. An article published in The Daily Picayune on 13 July, 1913 entitled, “Old Treasures of Loyola’s New Library” stated: “Loyola in her new development is young and formative, but behind its growth is strength and in its development there is purpose…A tour of the university is delightful, but one would better not start from the library. It is a room to induce bibliomania – and the world might go by.”

MAIN LIBRARY – 1950

  • Cost: $800,000
  • Size: 36,711 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 250,000
  • Architects: Wogan, Bernard & De La Vergne
  • Dedicated to: Students & Alumni killed in WWII

Main Library, 1960s

Construction of the new library building commenced in 1947, and was situated between Bobet and Marquette Halls. Archbishop Joseph Francis Rummel delivered the dedicatory blessing upon completion of the building on Palm Sunday, 1950. The proceedings were aired by WWL-Radio. Students helped to move the books from Bobet Library to the new Main Library. A quote by poet Paul L. Callens, S.J inscribed over the Main Library entrance reads, “The monuments which learned men have built for us throughout the ages you will find accumulated in these books.”

Main Library construction

Main Library book display

Main Library

J. EDGAR AND LOUISE S. MONROE LIBRARY – 1999

  • Cost: $20,000,000
  • Size: 148,480 sq. ft.
  • Volume Capacity: 500,000
  • Architects: The Mathes Group
  • Dedicated to: J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe

Monroe Library, 2016

Groundbreaking ceremonies commenced in November 1996 for the new J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library by co-chairs of the capital campaign, Adelaide Wisdom Benjamin and Michael J. Rapier. Other university and community dignitaries assisted in the ceremony. Construction began that month, and continued through completion of the building in October 1998. Library faculty and staff worked with Covan movers to transport the collection from the Main Library to the Monroe Library. The new J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library opened its doors for patrons on January 11, 1999.

Monroe Library Computer Lab, 2003

Monroe Library Reference Desk, 2003

Monroe Library Learning Commons, 2008

Monroe Library Snowflake, 2008

More information about the library’s history can be found in our new Loyola University New Orleans Library History Collection.

UP001949

How have libraries transformed YOU?

SGA Elections of the 50s

SGA Elections were last week. While you anxiously await the results, enjoy these images of Loyola students voting in the 1950s.

These photos and more can be found in the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Collection Spotlight: Dawson Gaillard Papers

Dawson Ann Forman Gaillard Keefe was born on September 25, 1938, in Marietta, Georgia, and grew up in Monroe (Ouachita Parish), Louisiana, graduating from Neville High School. She earned a B. A. in Social Studies and English at Louisiana State University (1959) and both a Master’s (1965) and Doctorate in English (1970) from Tulane University. Gaillard was a member of the faculty of Loyola University New Orleans from 1968 to 1983, and served as chair of that department from 1974 to 1977. She also edited the New Orleans Review from 1973 to 1979.

She worked as copy manager for the LSU Press from 1979 to 1981 and wrote the copy for the advertisements and book jackets of Confederacy of Dunces and other titles.  Gaillard authored a book entitled Dorothy L. Sayers (1980) on the English mystery writer and (with colleague John Mosier)  co-edited a groundbreaking anthology of short fiction, Women and Men Together (1978).

Her battle with multiple sclerosis contributed to her eventual departure from academic and professional life, and on October 1, 1985 she died in an accident at her home in Metairie, Louisiana.  The annual Dawson Gaillard Writing Awards are held in her honor at Loyola University, recognizing student work in the categories of expository writing, creative non-fiction, poetry, fiction, and script.

The Dawson Gaillard Papers consist primarily of the personal and professional writings of Dr. Dawson Gaillard. These include…

Her personal diaries from 1951 to 1985:

Gaillard-diaries

Gaillard-diary-inside

Academic work and research papers written as a student and teacher:

Gaillard-MQ

Samples of her copyediting work from LSU Press, and a small amount of original nonfiction, fiction and poetry: Gaillard-Superbug

Gaillard-photos

Also included is research related to the 1927 murder trial of Ada LeBouef and Dr. Tom Dreher, including two audiocassette tapes of interviews conducted by Gaillard with Murphy Dreher, Tom Dreher’s nephew, and Mrs. Waleer Hamlin, the wife of Ada LeBouef’s lawyer.

Gaillard-notes

Gaillard-tapes

The Dawson Gaillard Papers are available for viewing in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Pi Day

It’s Pi Day! Here are Loyola students from days of yore enjoying some pi(e) related activities.

These images and more can be viewed in the Loyola University New Orleans University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Collection Spotlight: Tennessee Williams Baptism Collection

Today marks the 33rd anniversary of the death of American playwright Tennessee Williams.

Tennessee Williams was born Thomas Lanier Williams on March 26, 1911, in Columbus, Mississippi. After spending his later childhood in St. Louis, Missouri, Williams eventually moved to New Orleans, a city that would inspire much of his writing. Williams wrote notable plays as The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire, for which he earned the Pulitzer Prize, and is considered one of the greatest American playwrights of the Twentieth Century.

In 1941, Williams moved to Key West, Florida. After decades of alcohol and drug abuse, as well as struggling with mental illness, William’s brother Dakin came to visit in 1969. Having recently been converted to Catholicism himself, Dakin convinced Williams to meet with a Catholic priest, Father Joseph L. LeRoy, S.J. of St. Mary of the Sea church. Five days later Williams was baptized into the Catholic church, even though he had previously been baptized and raised as an Episcopalian. According to LeRoy, Williams said he believed he had always been a Catholic, in spirit. Williams claimed later to have never taken his conversion seriously.

In the aftermath and publicity, it was determined that since Williams was likely already baptized as an Episcopalian, Father LeRoy had violated guidelines set forth by the Vatican in 1947 which stated, “indiscriminate conditional Baptism . . . cannot be approved” unless “reasonable doubt persists” as to the previous baptism of the person. Father LeRoy was unaware of these guidelines at the time of the baptism and was thus called forth to explain his actions to Church leaders.

Tennessee Williams died on February 25, 1983, in New York City, apparently from an accident resulting from too much drug and alcohol use.

Father Joseph L. LeRoy, S.J. was a member of the New England Province, had been a missionary to Jamaica and was the Reverend at St. Mary, Star of the Sea church in Key West, Florida.

The Tennessee Williams Baptism Collection is available for viewing in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Collection Spotlight: Historic Postcard Collection

Series I of the collection includes postcards that consist of true photographs, both hand colored and black and white, as well as hand drawn images of Catholic structures and locations throughout the state of Louisiana, including postcards of Loyola University in New Orleans. The majority of the postcards depict the exterior of churches, but there are several interior images and other exterior subjects included. A majority of the postcards in this series are addressed to Mrs. Lena Sawyer, a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana.

This is an artificial collection informally collected over time at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives.

Series II of the collection features postcards and postcard booklets from foreign locations, mainly in France and Switzerland. None of the postcards in this series are addressed.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy 383rd birthday, Samuel Pepys!

Samuel Pepys, an Englishman who rose to renown as a naval administrator and member of Parliament, is best-known not for his professional success but for a diary kept 1660-1669.

Everybody’s Pepys: The Diary of Samuel Pepys, 1660-1669 is a gem–perhaps the most important primary resource for the study of the English restoration period! The diary records the daily life of Pepys for nearly a decade and recounts major events including the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the Great Plague of London, and the Great Fire of London.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.