Posts Tagged ‘Archives’

Summer Fun

Summer classes are in full swing, but hopefully Loyolans are still finding time for some fun this summer.

The original versions of these photos, and many more, can be found in the Loyola University New Orleans Photograph Collection.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Be a Bachelor (or Bacheloress) in New Orleans

#howtotuesday: Be a Bachelor (or Bacheloress) in New Orleans

With the arrival of summer holidays, pleasure-seekers descend upon New Orleans in full force. Whether you are an “unattached gentlemen or lady of spirit visiting” or perhaps a long-time “resident in the Paris of America,” The Bachelor in New Orleans provides a candid guide to the Crescent City. The charming handbook, printed in 1942 and illustrated with vibrant block prints throughout, launches directly into heart of the matter with “Chapter 1: Of Drink and the Devil,” a guide to New Orleans’ most potent beverages and notable bars (many of which are still in operation today).

Additional chapters provide the Bachelor with instruction on fine dining (“be kind to your food, and it will love you…so will the chef”), curing loneliness, surviving Mardi Gras, and my personal favorite, how not to be a tourist.

According to The Bachelor in New Orleans, in order to avoid the horror of being mistaken as a tourist, one should keep the following don’ts in mind:

  • Never, never kick garbage cans! This is a cardinal sin for Bachelors in New Orleans.
  • Never stand and stare at any happening, no matter how rare, outrageous, unseemly, or unconventional it may strike you. If an unusual happening is pleasant or gay, a New Orleans Bachelor unobtrusively takes part in it; if it is unpleasant, the Bachelor in New Orleans unobtrusively takes part in something else.
  • Never raise your voice above Martha Raye’s level. People across the river and in adjoining parishes have to sleep. In the French Quarter, of course, no one could sleep if a sudden quiet fell in the streets. Bed-occupiers would sit bolt upright, in a cold sweat!
  • Never ask an interesting looking individual if he is an artist. He might be one, in which case he will resent you. And if he is not, he may cause you some embarrassment.
  • Do not attempt to direct traffic or dance bands while over-intoxicated. You will not do your best job if you have had one too many, and a most remarkable and unpleasant snarl may result.

And finally,

  • If you are a male Bachelor, never make what could be considered the first pass at any woman you have not known all your life. If she is interested, or can be satisfactorily interested, she will make the first pass—and if you are a Bachelor in New Orleans, you will know when it happens. This rule does not apply to female Bachelors in New Orleans: being females, they have their own rules about these matters and do what they’re going to do anyway.

At any rate, don’t be a tourist.

For further tips on thriving in 1940’s New Orleans, visit the Special Collections & Archives to peruse The Bachelor in New Orleans in full.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Bateman Team 1997-

Loyola’s Bateman Team, a group of public relations students from the School of Mass Communication, has just received yet another first place win in the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA)’s Bateman Case Study Competition. Loyola’s team has consistently placed in the top 3 for the past 15 years. Below are articles from the Maroon covering some of the team’s illustrious history.

1997 Maroon

2000 Maroon

2003 Maroon

2005 Maroon

2010 Maroon

2012 Maroon

Bonus: Bateman bocce ball

2003 Wolf Yearbook

Congratulations to the team!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Lafcadio Hearn Letters

Today we are highlighting pages 5-7 of Letter 24 from our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection. This collection primarily consists of letters written between the years 1840-1896 from Hearn to Page Mercer Baker, a New Orleans newspaper founder, reporter and editor.

The Lafcadio Hearn was a reporter, writer, and world traveler who was born in Greece, spent his childhood in Dublin, Ireland, England, and emigrated to the United States living in Cincinnati, New York, and New Orleans to eventually live and be laid to rest in Japan. He is a truly fascinating literary figure known not only for his writing about the darker sides of life, black culture, Japanese ghost stories, and the macabre, but also his life spent as an outsider and traveler.

Follow these links to enjoy a fascinating 2-part radio documentary produced by RTE Lyric FM in Dublin, Ireland and learn more about Hearn’s life and work.

The letter was written in the month of June in 1887 days before he traveled from New York City to Trinidad aboard the Barracouta on an assignment for Harper’s Magazine. The resulting article “Midsummer Trip to The West Indies” appeared in the July 1888 issue of the magazine. Hearn’s excitement for his travel south is obvious as found in the prose of the letter.

Below you will find a transcription of the last 3 pages of the letter. Hearn writes Baker conjuring his connection to New Orleans  “I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O.”   And writes further looking beyond the city with expectation of what he will experience during his travels “I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world….”

Letter 24, pages 5-7

I am writing as usual in a hurry. One day more, Then South. I will pass you by again, and not see you, – but I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O. Then, a few days more and I shall be more than a thousand miles south of you. All the way the sky will deepen it’s blue. – I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world…. After all, I cannot say I feel glad at going. The sensation of belonging to nowhere, – of instability; – nothing solid or certain in life or work or effort, – always comes on one prior to seeking a strange latitude. You understand, as by some sudden revelation, what a monstrous whirl of dust and light all life is, and that you are but one atom of the eddy, – may be laid here, there, anywhere, – to rest a little, to struggle a little, or to shine a moment in the light; but sooner or later all the motes float into the darkness and the silence forever. Before, it will be some consolation to have seen what makes life and thought, – Light, in the most splendid aspect it can offer to human eyes.

Please don’t show my letter to anyone, outside Toledano and Prytania corner, – so that I can write to you just as I want

Always with love to you,

Lafcadio Hearn

Goodbye!

You can find this letter in its entirety along with others in our Digital Library or come and view the complete Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection in person Monday through Friday 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Now Available: The Stephen Dankner Collection of Musical Works and Papers

From Stephen Dankner's Cello Sonata Movement I (1968)Former Loyola College of Music professor Stephen Dankner donated a collection of his music scores and other papers to Loyola after moving to Massachusetts in 2006. The husband of former Loyola music librarian Laura Dankner, Stephen is a prolific composer and educator who has won awards and commissions from around the world. The majority of the items in this collection are original holograph scores and parts by Dankner as well as sketches (rough-draft pencil outlines for pieces, usually incomplete), printed scores, and research notes. In addition to scores, the collection includes correspondence to and from copyright agencies, friends, performers, publishing companies, record labels, recording studios, and teachers; and concert programs, newspaper and electronic reviews, press releases, and photos. A large portion of the collection is dedicated to the creation and premiere by the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra of Symphony No. 5: Odyssey of Faith (2001)—a performance which featured the Loyola University Chorale and soprano and baritone soloists Ellen and Philip Frohnmayer, both College of Music and Fine Arts voice faculty. The items in the collection give a rare insight into the compositional process as well as the business of being a composer.

The finding aid for the collection can be viewed here.

The Stephen Dankner Collection of Musical Works and Papers is open for research use in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives. Special Collections (Room 333, Monroe Library ) is open Monday – Friday from  8:30am to 4:45pm.

For more on Stephen Dankner, search the Monroe Library catalog.