Search Results

Now Hiring: Learning Commons Coordinator

http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities
Professional Staff Opening:  Learning Commons Coordinator -  J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans.

The Monroe Library Learning Commons (LC) is an evolving and active space where students, faculty, and staff come together to study, learn, teach, create, and collaborate.

The Learning Commons Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the Learning Commons, the main point of service at the Monroe Library. The LC Coordinator provides vision and leadership in the ongoing development of the Learning Commons with a commitment to customer satisfaction and quality and creates a dynamic and innovative environment based upon current research and best practices. The Learning Commons Coordinator will take a lead in the development and evaluation of library services, policies, and teaching and learning spaces.

The Learning Commons Coordinator is responsible for training library faculty, staff, and students, scheduling shifts, and assessment. The Learning Commons Coordinator works to establish strategic relationships with library teams, campus departments, and programs committed to the design of services aimed at supporting student success. The Learning Commons Coordinator is dedicated to student success and retention.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree; minimum of three years of library experience with increasing responsibilities; minimum 3 years library experience working in access or public services; strong personnel management experience and knowledge of principles of management; supervisory experience required; commitment to innovative and responsive service; excellent customer service skills; demonstrated problem-solving and conflict resolution skills; demonstrated ability to work in an active learning environment and juggle multiple tasks with a high degree of accuracy in complex, detailed work; excellent interpersonal, written and verbal communication skills with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with faculty, staff, students and others; skills and experience in the use of computer applications for word processing, scanning, printing, spreadsheets, etc.; skills and experience in project planning and implementation in a service environment; collaborative strategic planning. Preferred qualifications include: Experience and/or interest in developing and management of innovative learning spaces; experience working in an academic library service environment and familiarity with the higher education landscape; circulation and/or access services experience; experience with scheduling software; computer lab experience; survey and assessment experience; teaching and or training experience; experience and/or interest in outreach and promotion.

Physical Requirements: Lift and carry equipment, supplies, or materials weighing up to 30 lbs.; Access upper library shelves with a step stool and bend to lower shelves; push a fully loaded, wheeled, book cart, up to 100 lbs.; Sustain long periods of standing/walking back and forth; bend, stoop, and reach equipment and materials at the Learning Commons desk.

Competitive salary based on education and experience.

Loyola offers an excellent benefits package including generous tuition benefits for full-time employees and their dependents.

To apply for a currently posted position, please email your resume and cover letter with the job title as the subject to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department

Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16

6363 St. Charles Avenue

New Orleans, LA 70118

Please complete our EEO Inquiry Form when applying. Please do not include the EEOC form in the same email with your resume or with the printed application.

Atilla

1969atilla001

This 1969 adaptation of Atilla marked a special occasion in the history of the NOOA, and even internationally.
As the pamphlet explains,

ATTILA, Verdi’s ninth opera, was written in 1846 for the spring season of La Fenice- the Phoenix- in Venice. It was an instantaneous success, due to the already established reputation of its 33-year old composer, and to its patriotic theme. Four years after its premiere ATTILA was enthusiastically received in New York at Niblo’s Garden, with Marini, for whom it was written, in the title role. ATIILA’s popularity was short-lived, however- Verdi’s later works eclipsing it- and it gradually dropped out of repertories. In 1951 Venice presented a concert version of the opera, but it was not until 1962 that the work was staged in Florence. This was followed by an English performance by Sadler’s Wells, and in the past few years revivals have been mounted in Germany, Austria, Italy, Poland and Argentina. The New Orleans Opera’s production is the first in the United States since the middle of the last century.

Not only that, in this pamphlet there is cover art, and the whole script was printed, which is rather new.  It is rather interesting to flip through and see the English version along with the Italian, so maybe you could learn some helpful phrases such as Qual suono?, which means ‘what is with all of the shouting?’.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1969, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.

The Loyola Lady

As Women’s History Month draws to a close, we reflect on the history of women at Loyola University with the 1962 issue of The Loyola Lady, a handbook for women students distributed by the university.

Loyola Lady Cover

You are 35% strong, co-eds. You compose 35% of the enrollment of Loyola University according to the 1961-62 enrollment figures. Today that figure has increased because more and more young ladies are coming to Loyola each year. When Loyola became a university, the Class of 1911 boasted a 32 student membership with one coed, Miss Lurline Wilson of Independence. The '61-'62 enrollment figures showed approximately 3,200 students from 33 states with 25 countries plus U.S. possessions. Today's registration will hoist that figure. A need for a handbook entirely on the feminine side was pointed out by the Dean of Women. This project was begun last year with a booklet entitled "The Wolfette," edited by Mary Ann Vial, Cathy Lund and Kathy Eberle. This year the booklet, "The Loyola Lady," is published with the sincere hope that it will help you to get to know Loyola and to become a part of this great institution of learning by contributing your very best to the excellent spirit of friendliness, cooperation and leadership that exists in the classrooms and on the campus of Loyola University.

Welcome, Loyola Lady. Welcome to the Loyola campus and sincere best wishes that the coming year will be marked with success in your academic, social, and personal life on the university level. To help you to know what is expected of and what is offered to the Loyola lady, we have prepared this handbook for you. Take a few moments of your time to read it carefully in order that you may become better acquainted with your Alma Mater. Rosalie Parrino, Dean of Women. "Takehold on instruction, leave it not, keep it, because it is thy life." Proverbs, Chapter 4, 13. Published by Loyola University, 1600 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana. Editor: Charmaine Currault.

While Loyola Lady is unsurprisingly outdated, it also highlights many of the activities and service activities women students engaged in in the 60s and encourages female students to participate in intramural sports.

For those of you who are would-be marksmen, there's an excellent rifle team which has competed in a number of state-wide tournaments. In the spring, the department is planning to have a swimming team. Needless to say, you do not have to be a great star to participate in these activities. Remember it's the spirit that counts. The Powder Puff Bowl, an annual even, will include a male "Sweetheart Court." Believe me, in this girls' football game, they come up with a few tricks the boys have never seen.

College Togs. Dress properly for every occasion. Clothing should play an important part in the college coeds plans for college. That is why it is necessary for you to realize how important it is to be properly dressed for every occasion. A first impression be a "good impress" if you dress properly. Things to bring to Loyola. 1. Sweaters and skirts (Bulk style popular).  2. Summer cottons (New Orleans weather is warm until November). 3. Loafers, flats and iby league saddles are worn to class 4. Raincoat or trench coat ( We do have our rainy season) 5. Heavy coat for dress purposes, short coat for sports wear or casual dress. 6. Cocktail dresses are used for evening receptions, semi-formals , operas or fraternity rush party dates. 7. Long formals are rarely worn. Semiformals are the vogue. 8. Drip-dry blouses. 9. Accessories: jewelry (small pearl earrings and necklaces are popular--too many rhinestones are not in good taste. Scarfs, gloves, purse (a small book size purse.) 10. Small handkerchief size veils or chapel caps are popular for week day Mass. A basic black, navy, or brown dress is always in good taste . 12. Opera pumps are always fashionable. 13. Bermuda shorts, slim jims, and a bathing suit.

Little Reminders That Help. The Loyola Lady is courteous at all times. Here are a few rules on introductions and such: 1. Young peopl are presented to older people, a man is presented to a woman, and a less important person is pre-sented to a more important one.  2. A student should introduce herself to faculty members or to guests of the University at any social function . 3. All invitations must be answered promptly. In replying always use plain stationery and black or blue-black ink. In a formal reply, use the third person, making no abbreviations, and writing out all numbers. This should be in the same form as the invitation. Remember that no reply is necessary when the name of a person to whom to send the reply is not given. 4. It is the hostess' privilege and duty to greet the chaperones, introduce them to one another, the students, and served to the chaperones before others are served.

Our University Archives contain images of female Wolfpack students engaging in a number of the activities detailed in The Loyola Lady including rifle practice, the Powder Puff game, attending mass, and hosting social functions.

Target practice

Target shooting team

Churchgoers receiving communion at the Mass of the Holy Ghost

Student in freshman beanie at Baccalaureate Mass

Students at a Dance, 1953

Women students eating

Women students in dorm

Women students cooking

Women students serving food

1965 Wolf Yearbook "Pumpkin Bowl"

1969 Wolf Yearbook Powder Puff

The Loyola Lady is available in the University Archives Vertical File in Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday, 9-4:30pm.

Black History Month and opera

The New Orleans Opera has had the privilege of performing with some of the most talented and accomplished opera singers in the world, including a number of black opera singers. In conjunction with Black History Month, following are a few of the illustrious singers of color who have performed with the NOOA.

Verrett_NOOA_B40_F13_003

Native New Orleanian Shirley Verrett (pictured here in a 1983 NOOA performance of Tosca) filled in as Carmen for the NOOA in 1980, making her the first black singer to perform the role with NOOA. She had previously been the first black singer to perform the role at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow.

1996_Alfred-Walker_DieFledermaus

Bass-baritone Alfred Walker has become an international superstar since he graduated from Loyola’s master’s program in 1996. Walker won the Regional Metropolitan Opera Council Audition and made his Metropolitan Opera debut as Grégorio in Roméo et Juliette in 1998. He has performed with NOOA in Macbeth and Elektra (1994); Madama Butterfly (1995); Andrea Chénier (1996); Rigoletto (1997); and La Bohème (2014). He is pictured above in Loyola’s 1996 performance of Die Fledermaus.

2010_Givonna-Joseph-Hope-Briggs-and-Aria-Mason_Porgy-and-Bess

Another Loyola alum, Giovanna Joseph, has performed supporting roles in Salome and Porgy and Bess with NOOA. In 2011, Joseph founded Opera Creole, a nonprofit company dedicated to discovering and performing music written by nineteenth century New Orleans Creole men and women of color. She is pictured above (left) with her daughter Aria Mason (right) and singer Hope Briggs (middle) in NOOA’s 2010 Porgy and Bess; this performance marks the first time a mother and daughter both had singing roles in the same NOOA production (image courtesy of Givonna Joseph).

NOOA_B31F4_1981_Ballo_Debria-Brown

Mezzo-soprano Débria Brown was another trailblazing New Orleans native who battled prejudice to become an international opera star. Brown graduated from Xavier University and began her professional career with the New York City Opera opposite Loyola alum and fellow New Orleanian Norman Treigle. She later achieved success singing in Germany and Vienna before becoming a professor of voice at the University of Houston Moores School of Music. Brown performed with NOOA in Un Ballo in Maschera (pictured above in 1981) and Eugene Onegin (1995).

NOOA_B51F8_Salome_Marquita-Lister

Opera soprano Marquita Lister performed two of her signature roles in Porgy and Bess and Salome with NOOA in 2002. Lister has also served as the national spokesperson for the Negro “Spiritual” Scholarship Foundation.

A large portion of the New Orleans Opera Association Archives are Artists’ Files. These include head shots, press kits, and correspondence, in many cases sent by artist management companies, for artists who performed with NOOA as well as many who didn’t. These files contain beautiful graphic materials for  some of the most famous opera singers of the 20th century, including many of the world’s leading black singers.

NOOA_BF11_LaVergne-Monette

LaVergne Monette

NOOA_B17F35_Barbara-Hendricks

Barbara Hendricks

NOOA_B15F8_Simon-Estes

Simon Estes

NOOA_B12F10_Barbara-Conrad_002
NOOA_B12F10_Barbara-Conrad_001

Barbara Conrad

NOOA_B12F6_Vinson-Cole

Vinson Cole

NOOA_B10F14_Grace-Bumbry

Grace Bumbry

NOOA_B6F20_Betty-Allen_001
NOOA_B6F20_Betty-Allen_002

Betty Allen

NOOA_B6F11_Donnie-Ray-Albert

Donnie Ray Albert

Many if not all of these singers faced intense racial prejudice in establishing the rights of black singers to perform with regional, national, and international opera companies. Alison Kinney’s “As the Met Abandons Blackface, a Look at the Legacy of African Americans in Opera” details struggles faced by black American opera singers as well as the use of white singers to portray black characters, as does Naomi Adele André’s Blackness in Opera (available for checkout from the Monroe Library).

The materials pictured above, and many more like them, are available for research in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives at Special Collections & Archives‘ Booth-Bricker Reading Room Monday – Friday from 9am-4:30pm.

A Night at the Opera

Todd-1Slider-768x270
On February 10th, at around 7:30 p.m., I walked into the Mahalia Jackson Theater. I gave the staff my ticket, and walked in. It seemed a little bland at first, but I got a a soda at the bar and made my way to my seat. It was in the center, in the middle of the large auditorium, so it was perfect. They called for the start at 7:55, and then, the curtains rose at around 8:10 after announcements. That’s when a man hobbled to the center of the stage, and started to break out into song about a demon barber.

The New Orleans Opera Association performed Sweeney Todd last weekend, and I had the chance to go see it. After scanning the pamphlets for months, I must admit, I was curious to see the opera for myself.

Although they missed out a chance to make it a dinner theater, it was still amazing. The voices were extremely talented, the set was wonderful, and how they managed to make blood spurt 10 feet into the air still confuses me. If anyone is not familiar with the story, I apologize. It is exactly what it sounds like. The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Sweeney Todd, slit throats with a razor in order to fulfill his thirst for revenge. They inconspicuously managed to put a device on the victims and make blood spurt, even getting some on the orchestra, before making the chair seat drop and the body fell through the floor and into the basement, where they were ground up for meat pies. That thankfully was just props.  The show totaled up to 3 hours, with a 20 minute intermission, and it was 11 when I got out. Even though I was absolutely tired, ready to peel my makeup off and curl up in some blankets, I had such a wonderful time.

For anyone that hasn’t gone to see the New Orleans Opera, I highly recommend you go. They’re currently in their 74th year, so if there’s any year that you should go, it’s the next. They have numerous performances planned until then, so if you want to have a night of pure talent and have your mind blown, give them a visit!

We also have an exhibit on the New Orleans Opera Association in Special Collections & Archives and  pamphlets in our digital collections if you are curious to learn about their history.

-This blog was written by student worker Miranda

Collection Spotlight: Norman Treigle Papers

In memoriam of the anniversary of Norman Treigle’s death on February 16th, 1975 we are spotlighting our Norman Treigle Papers collection.

Adanelle Wilfred (Norman) Treigle was born in New Orleans on March 6, 1927, the youngest of five children born to Wilfred and Claudia (Fischer) Treigle. His introduction to music was through his mother, who played both piano and organ, and his singing career began as a boy soprano in a church choir.

Determined to pursue a musical career, Treigle entered Loyola University where he studied with Elisabeth Wood for seven years. He won the New Orleans Opera House Auditions of the Air in 1947 and made his operatic debut with the company as the Duke of Verona in Roméo et Juliette. Over the next six years he developed a repertoire of twenty-two roles with the New Orleans Opera and studied both drama and ballet to prepare for his career as a singing actor. He sang solos at religious services of all denominations, performed with the New Orleans Pops and the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, and hosted a radio show on WWL. According to his daughter Phyllis, the proprietors of WWL suggested that he change his name from “Addie” to a more professional stage name, and after studying various names, Treigle finally chose “Norman,” the name previously bestowed on his son.

Although only 5’11” and 140 pounds, Treigle had a voice that belied his size and a dazzling acting ability. He was known for his dominating portrayals of Reverend Blitch in Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah, Grandpa Moss in Copland’s The Tender Land, Escamilio in Carmen and Mephistopheles in both Faust and Mephistofele as well the lead roles in Boris Gudonov, Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Gianni Schicchi. He and Beverly Sills often sang together in operas including Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Coq d’Or and Giulio Cesare that was produced to showcase Treigle in the City Opera’s premiere in new facilities at Lincoln Center in 1966.

Despite a vagabond career, he remained a New Orleanian. He and his second wife Linda lived near the lakefront with her daughter, Lisa, who Treigle adopted. His daughter Phyllis Susannah (born in 1961 and named after Phyllis Curtin, Treigle’s Susannah co-star) lived with her mother. He smoked constantly, drank Scotch, enjoyed wagering on the races at the New Orleans Fairgrounds, and was admired for his sense of humor and generosity.

On February 16, 1975, Treigle’s first wife, Loraine, found Treigle dead in his New Orleans apartment. The cause of death originally was thought to be result of a bleeding ulcer, but was later determined by the coroner to be an overdose of sleeping pills. Norman Treigle was forty-seven years old.

The Norman Treigle Papers consists of materials detailing the career and legacy of the opera singer. Press, programs, correspondence, contracts, photographs, costumes, and audio-visual materials are included in the collection. The bulk of the collection covers his years as a performer with some additional materials gathered after his death.

Treigle as Boito's Mefistofele

The collection is comprised of the following series:

Series I: Press & Programs

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Contracts, Royalties & Financial

Series IV: Public Relations & Memorial Fund

Series V: Sheet Music –  Subseries I: Opera Scores – Subseries II: Oratorios and Cantatas – Subseries III: Art Songs & Popular Songs

Series VI: Educational Resources

Series VII: Photographs

Series VIII: Brian Morgan Research Files

Series IX: Scrapbooks & Oversized Publications

Series X: Audio-Visual Materials – Subseries I: Moving Images – Subseries II: Audio

Series XI: Costumes

You can view and research the Norman Treigle Papers Monday through Friday from 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives of Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans.

Thank you New Orleans Opera Board!

Last night, Special Collections & Archives was pleased to host the New Orleans Opera Board for a viewing of our exhibits, LOYNOOA: Loyola University and Opera in New Orleans, and Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

IMG_3745

IMG_3744

IMG_3743

IMG_3742

Thank you to the Opera Board for coming and seeing a small portion of this wonderful collection.

Gloria’s Top 5 archives picks

The Special Collections and Archives department at Monroe Library is a safe place for history according to literature, correspondence, and documentation. On Loyola’s campus, there are several galleries, and many individual buildings that display art and framed history on the walls in the hallways; but on the third floor of the Monroe Library is a condensed and magical museum of information. If my introduction has not enticed you to explore the archives, maybe my “Top 5 Favorite Collections in the Archives” list will.

5. Germany’s Wild Medicinal PlantsThis collection is digitized, but in order to view the actual book in its entirety, you can request to see it via the in person in Special Collections. It is a collection of antique illustrations of each wildflower and their medicinal properties. The images are beautiful.

Angelica_archangelica

4. The Samway Book Collection – Patrick Samway, S.J. has donated a large portion of his personal book collection to Special Collections & Archives. Made up of almost 3,000 books primarily by Southern writers, I find his particular collection of William Faulkner literature most interesting. On the shelves is at least one of every piece written by William Faulkner; but for most, there made be 6 to even 12 different editions. One title in several languages, print editions, different cover art, etc. For the right kind of person, this is an impressive and fascinating collection of Faulkner literature!

faulkner-mosquitos

3. The Marguerite Piazza Papers – A small collection donated by the family of Ms. Piazza, I discovered it while organizing the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit. Ms. Piazza graduated from Loyola in what we called the golden Age of Opera Education. She was one of the first to graduate from the Vocal Performance department in opera studies. However, her life after Loyola was lived among the stars of Hollywood. Known for her talents as a vocalist, dancer, and actress she was stunningly beautiful and very popular. Her personal life was just as interesting. While going through her collection, it’s easy to get lost in her story (previously blogged here).

Piazza aboard American Airlines flight to Memphis after receiving the "Golden Stocking Award" from the hosiery industry for having the most glamorous legs in American, 1956.

2. John Kennedy Toole Manuscript – Yes, this is one of the Toole’s manuscripts – wrapped in a beautiful archive safe box and tied with a brown piece of yarn. There is no definitive “first manuscript” for A Confederacy of Dunces. However, this manuscript was, “donated by Lyn Hill Hayward, a longtime friend of Walker Percy’s, and described by her as the manuscript given Percy by Thelma Toole”.

1. First Edition Copy of Sylvia Plath’s Ariel – Sylvia Plath’s posthumous Ariel was initially published in 1966. This printing is part of the Robert Giroux Collection. Giroux was vice president and partner of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., and his book collection contains many first editions and signed copies of works by 20th century American writers.

Plath_Ariel_1

Posted by student worker Gloria S. Cosenza

Sounds of New Orleans Opera

We’ve blogged previously about the newly processed New Orleans Opera Association Archives and our exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives many times now, but did you know you can also HEAR historic recordings of the New Orleans Opera?

Thanks to the generosity of the Center for Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Special Collections & Archives has recordings of excerpts from three NOOA performances available on Soundcloud and youtube:

These represent only a small fraction of the audiovisual materials available in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives. The collection contains ~500 reel-to-reels and ~100 visual media (VHS, Betacam, and more) that are in danger of deterioration. Contact archives@loyno.edu for more information about our digitization program.

Madama Butterfly

nooa_00140001 nooa_00140014
nooa_00140015

If you were bored 54 years ago, you could have gone and seen Madama Butterfly at the New Orleans Opera this time of year! It’s an Italian opera centered around romance and honor. The synopsis from this website is posted below,

“This tragic tale revolves around the young Japanese geisha, Butterfly. She is to be married to Pinkerton, an American Officer on assignment in Nagasaki. Butterfly is young and naive, and fully believes her marriage to Pinkerton to be true and everlasting, while Pinkerton intends on marrying an American when he returns home. Butterfly waits for Pinkerton to return, having had a child by him that he does not know about. He returns, but with his new American wife, intending to take the child back to America. Rather than live in shame, Butterfly agrees to give up her child, but intends to kill herself out of honor. She kills herself to save the honor of her family, and for love.”

The last performance by the New Orleans Opera was in 2013, so it is quite possible to see it once again on their stage in the future. Even though it isn’t playing now, you should still check out the New Orleans Opera, because they have a bunch of amazing performances coming up.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1964, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

Happy holidays!

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.