New Orleans Review Online

Special Collections & Archives at the Monroe Library hosts scanned back issues of the New Orleans Review, Loyola’s literary journal, in the Louisiana Digital Library. The NOR, for short, was started in 1968 by English department faculty Miller Williams, and has included advisory editors such as Joseph Fichter, S.J., and Walker Percy. In addition to the online collection, Special Collections & Archives also holds the NOR archive which includes correspondence, copy-edits, historical records, and more.

From the NOR website, authors published in the NOR include:

Walker Percy, Pablo Neruda, Ellen Gilchrist, Nelson Algren, Hunter S. Thompson, John Kennedy Toole, Richard Brautigan, Joyce Carol Oates, James Sallis, Jack Gilbert, Paul Hoover, Tess Gallagher, Sherman Alexie, Valerie Martin, Annie Dillard, Everette Maddox, Julio Cortazar, Gordon Lish, Robert Walser, Mark Halliday, Robert Olen Butler, Michael Harper, Angela Ball, Diane Wakoski, Dermot Bolger, Ernest J. Gaines, Roddy Doyle, William Kotzwinkle, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Arnost Lustig, Raymond Queneau, Yusef Komunyakaa, Michael Martone, Matthea Harvey, Bill Cotter, D.A. Powell, Rikki Ducornet, Ed Skoog, and many others.

Current issues of the New Orleans Review can be ordered through their website.

Vintage commencement

Commencement is this weekend…congratulations to the class of 2017! As you wait to walk across that stage and receive your diploma, enjoy these images of Wolfpack grads from the past.

1950s commencement in front of the "Old Library"

1950s Baccalaureate Mass in Holy Name of Jesus Church

1950s commencement on the steps of the "Old Library"

Saints/Hornets owner Tom Benson preparing to receive Honorary Degree from President James Carter, S.J. in 1987

Students at commencement, 1987

The Landrieu family celebrating after Mitch (third from the left) Landrieu's graduation from Loyola Law, 1987

President James Carter, S.J. (left) with Honorary Degree recipient Mildred Jefferson (center) and Archbishop Hannan (right), 1979

Students at commencement, 1970

Students at commencement, 1970

1950s students at commencement

Commencement, 1981

View more historic commencement photos in the University Photographs collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Happy National Nurses Week!

May 6–12 is National Nurses Week. In commemoration, here are images from Loyola nursing students and staff from the past.

Wondering when these photos were taken, or who’s in them? So are we! Leave a comment to help us identify them.

Nursing students with nun

Nursing students

1950s nursing students on Marquette Hall steps

1950s/1960s nursing students on park bench

2 nursing students setting up "February Heart Month" display

Nursing student getting a freshman beanie on the front steps of Marquette Hall

Student having her pulse taken by a nurse6

Dance of the Flyers AKA Voladores ‘Flying Men’

Today in celebration of Cinco De Mayo, we bring you an excerpt of the Mexican Jesuit Francesco Saverio Clavigero’s book, The history of Mexico. Collected from Spanish and Mexican historians, from manuscripts and ancient paintings of the Indians. Illustrated by Charts and other copper plates. To which are added, critical dissertations on the land, the animals, and inhabitants of Mexico.

This book is available for research M-F 9-4:30 and is part of our Archives & Special Collections as well as available electronically as part of the Internet Archive.

I chose to highlight pages 402 through 404 from Volume 1 that give a description of the mesoamerican ritual called the Dance of the Flyers AKA Pole Flying AKA Ceremony of the Voladores (Flying Men). The reason I chose to highlight this section is because I had the opportunity to see a performance of this ritual recently outside of the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City.

This dance has been awarded a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity distinction and is described as follows on their website:

“The ritual ceremony of the Voladores (‘flying men’) is a fertility dance performed by several ethnic groups in Mexico and Central America, especially the Totonac people in the eastern state of Veracruz, to express respect for and harmony with the natural and spiritual worlds. During the ceremony, four young men climb a wooden pole eighteen to forty metres high, freshly cut from the forest with the forgiveness of the mountain god. A fifth man, the Caporal, stands on a platform atop the pole, takes up his flute and small drum and plays songs dedicated to the sun, the four winds and each of the cardinal directions. After this invocation, the others fling themselves off the platform ‘into the void’. Tied to the platform with long ropes, they hang from it as it spins, twirling to mimic the motions of flight and gradually lowering themselves to the ground. Every variant of the dance brings to life the myth of the birth of the universe, so that the ritual ceremony of the Voladores expresses the worldview and values of the community, facilitates communication with the gods and invites prosperity. For the dancers themselves and the many others who participate in the spirituality of the ritual as observers, it encourages pride in and respect for one’s cultural heritage and identity.”

Here is part of Clavigero’s description of the ritual:

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And the copper plate illustration of the ritual that faces page 4o2:

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As an added bonus, here is a short video I shot on my phone while experiencing the performance in February:

Russell Gerard Cresson, 1921 – 2017

Russell Gerard Cresson, for 40-years the official photographer of Loyola, passed away last month on April 23rd at the age of 96.

From 1949 until 1987, Cresson (also an alumnus of the University), documented Loyola’s campus, faculty, staff, students, and events. Much of this record is in our Loyola University Photographs Collection. Not all of our Cresson images have been digitized, but you can view the 8230 currently available through the Louisiana Digital Library.

We here in the Special Collections & Archives extend our deepest sympathies to Cresson’s family and friends and offer our sincere gratitude for his years of dedication to documenting the life of Loyola University.

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Wolf Yearbook picture editor Bob Reso (left) with University photographer Russ Cresson (right)

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

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We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

Spring 2017 Extended Study Hours

Spring 2017 Extended Study has come and gone.

Monroe Library will once again be open 24 hours during final exams. Our hours are:

24 hours from 11am Sunday, April 30 to 2am Saturday, May 6
(closed Saturday, May 6 2am-9am)

9am Saturday, May 6 to 2am Sunday, May 7
(closed Sunday, May 7 2am-9am)

24 hours from 9am Sunday, May 7 to 10pm Thursday, May 11
Friday, May 12 7:30am-6pm

Closed Saturday, May 13 and Sunday, May 14

We offer free coffee 12am-7am during our 24 hour periods. Please be sure
to pick up an Extended Study Pamphlet at Monroe Librarys Learning Commons Desk.

Good luck on all your final exams and projects!

Contact Emily Bufford (Learning Commons Coordinator) at 504-864-7118 or edbuffor@loyno.edu for more.

Library History Resources

In Special Collections & Archives, we have a lot of different materials about the history of Loyola, New Orleans, and the Jesuits, and many years worth of different university publications. However, we also have materials related to the history of the library itself, and many of those items have been digitized!

There are many digitized photographs of students in the old library (all c. 1950-1960):

All of those pictures can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Clicking on one of the photos above will bring you to that collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

There are also copies of library newsletters from 1983-2009. These newsletters were distributed primarily to students and faculty to highlight some of the resources and new technology in the Monroe library.

You can find these newsletters in the Loyola University Library History Collection. To view items from this collection in the Louisiana Digital Library, click on any of the images above. More digitized materials about the history of the library can be found in  the Maroon newspaper, the Wolf Yearbook, and the Bulletins.

While our digitized collections can be accessed 24/7, you can come visit us in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday through Friday, from 9am until 4:30pm.

This post was written by student worker Maureen.

Marbled Monday: SC&A joins the Art Department

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For this week’s “Marbled Monday” post, I am sharing something a little different than usual. Last Wednesday, I had the pleasure of visiting professor Bill Kitchen’s bookbinding class in Loyola’s art department. As project assistant in Special Collections & Archives, my background in bookbinding and repair is something I love sharing with students interested in book art. I spent the afternoon teaching art students one of my favorite sewing patterns: the French-web or two-hole link stitch binding. I often use this particular sewing structure when repairing dis-bound books in our stacks. I chose to incorporate handmade paper tapes to add a bit of style to the exposed spines of their books and also allow for hard-cover attachment. The students did a fantastic job, and I had a blast working with them!

ArchivesSpace

ArchiveSpace

ArchivesSpace is an archives management tool that shows where each box of the archives is. I typed in all the possible Ranges, Sections, Shelves, and floors So I could begin inputting where the objects are. I spent mainly early March inputting the locations. I used most of my March and April internship inputting boxes onto its correct ArchivesSpace, Range, Section, Shelf, and Floor. I am still working on it. I spent almost forty internship hours working on this source.

Blog post by Intern Benjamin Schexnayder