Collection Spotlight: Deiler Papers


from J. Hanno Deiler Papers Box 1 Folder 5, "Church and Parish Records: Carrollton, 1848-1900"

Today marks 167 years since the birth of J. Hanno Deiler, creator of Special Collections & Archives’ J. Hanno Deiler Papers. Deiler was born at Altoetting, Upper Bavaria on August 8, 1849. In 1871 he accepted a position as principal of a German school in New Orleans.  He arrived in New Orleans early in 1872, and in 1879 he became professor of German at the University of Louisiana, which later became Tulane University.

It was Deiler’s ambition to cultivate a taste for German literature, culture, and song in New Orleans and to improve the condition of Germans in the United States.  He served for many years as director of the Deutsche Gesellschaft, an immigrant aid society.  He started the German Archives for the History of the Germans in the South.  In 1882 he founded and served as president of the New Orleans Quartette Club,  which was dedicated to the preservation of German culture and song.  He was president of the New Orleans German Gazette Publishing Company and wrote extensively about Germans in the United States, especially in Louisiana,  contributing to numerous German and American periodicals and authoring one book, The Settlement of the German Coast of Louisiana and the Creoles of German Descent (available in digitized form here and here at the Internet Archive).  In 1898 the German Emperor recognized Deiler’s literary achievements and his services to the German people in the U.S. by conferring upon him knighthood in the Order of the Crown. Deiler died at his summer home in Covington, Louisiana on July 20, 1909.


from J. Hanno Deiler Papers Box 1 Folder 2, "Census of German Villages, 1724 "

These papers consist principally of notes Deiler took while researching the history of Germans and German-Americans in Louisiana.  They also contain writings by Deiler, a small amount of correspondence, and miscellaneous items.  Much of the material is undated; most items probably originated between 1890 and 1909.

Additional materials relating to Deiler are available at the Historic New Orleans Collection, including the Deutsches Haus Collection.


from J. Hanno Deiler Papers Box 1 2 Folder 14, "Count de Leon, Duke of Jerusalem and the Colony 'Germantown,' Webster Parish, Louisiana"

This collection is available for research in the in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

Olympic Odes

The Games of the XXXI Olympiad, known in it’s host country of Brazil as Jogos Olímpicos de Verão de 2016, will be kicking off in Rio de Janeiro next week. To celebrate, we are looking at The Olympic and Pythian Odes of Pindar.

The Olympic Odes were written by Pindar circa 476 B.C. and celebrate the victors of the Ancient Olympic Games, “either by speed of horses, strength and dexterity on running, wrestling or boxing, or skill in music.” The edition held by Special Collections & Archives was privately printed in 1903 by Nathan Haskell Dole, Boston.

Before there was Street-View

Being a fan of travelling to new destinations but not being able to do so as often as I would like, I love being able to look at pictures of the places I wish to go.  Seeing places in a photograph allows you to imagine yourself seeing it in person for the first time, but with modern technology you can be right in front of that famous monument with just a click of a button thanks to developments such as Google’s Street-View option in their maps.

Although, in 1893 before the time of the internet, and back when travelling across the world was not as easily accessible, people relied on picture books such as Thomas Knox’s “Scenes from Every Land” to see the famous places they wished to travel. And those people who could not see these sites with their own eyes were exactly who this book was directed towards, as General Lee Wallace addresses in the introduction, “ To the few who have traveled; to the many who would like to go abroad, , but are restrained by timidity; to the lacking in funds; to the sick and convalescent who promise themselves sight of the world when health will permit; more especially, to the multitude of unfortunates, who, on account of incurable ailments of whatever kinds, can never hope to escape the narrow confines in which their lots are cast, I venture to address this introduction.”
Scenes From Every Land

This particular book holds over 500 pictures from around the world, from Syria to New Zealand and famous buildings to museum galleries, this book shows it all. But one thing that is interesting to wonder when flipping through the pages of this book is how many of these famous sites have changed since the late 1800s, and thanks to Google Street-View we are able to see just how different, if at all, things are. Just click the links below each picture to see how they are today.

Westminster Abbey, London

Westminster Abbey, London

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower, Paris

The Vatican, Rome

The Vatican, Rome

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The Colosseum, Rome

Leaning Tower of Pisa

The Campanile, or Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

Court of Lions in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain

Court of Lions in the Alhambra , Granada, Spain

St. Basil

St. Basil, the Beatified, Moscow

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Cleopatra's Needle, Alexandria, Egypt

Cleopatra’s Needle, New York

(The obelisk was originally in Alexandria, Egypt when this photo was taken but was later moved to Central Park in New York City in 1881)

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Washington Monument, Washington D.C.

Degas and New Orleans

“Louisiana must be respected by all her children of which I am almost one…”

Edgar Degas to Henri Rouart. New Orleans, December 5, 1872.

Today marks the birthday of Edgar Degas (1834-1917).

Degas was born in Paris, but his mother was from New Orleans and his family was closely tied to the city.

For a few months in 1872-73, Degas lived with family, including his brother René (who had married their New Orleans cousin, Estelle Musson) at the large Musson family home on Esplanade Avenue. (The home is now a bed and breakfast.)

Degas’s stay in New Orleans resulted in multiple paintings of his family members. A Cotton Office in New Orleans, below, depicts family members, including two of Degas’ brothers, in the offices of his uncle Michel Musson. (Musson is depicted in the foreground, wearing a top hat.)

A Cotton Office, painted in New Orleans in 1873, was the first impressionist painting to be acquired by any museum and marked a turning point in Edgar Degas’ career.

Learn more about Degas and his connection to New Orleans in Edgar Degas: His Family and Friends in New Orleans, available in Special Collections & Archives.

Faulkner’s “Mosquitoes”

Special Collections and Archives holds many editions of the of the works of William Faulkner. Here is a look at some editions of Mosquitoes, an early novel of Faulkner’s set in New Orleans and aboard a boat in Lake Pontchartrain.

You can view these books in person Monday through Friday 9:00 – 4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rdfloor of Monroe Library.

Vintage Summer

It’s hot out there! Enjoy these photos of Loyolians of the past taking advantage of the warm weather.

"Children's Art Classes - Cynthia Clark - teacher 1973 (summer)"

"Children's Art Classes - Summer 1973."

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants (Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen)

Published in 1828, Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen (Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants), by Johann Gottlieb Mann, contains hand-colored lithographs of medical plants, flowers, and fruits. Here is a small selection. To view more of these lithographs click HERE to access them via Louisiana Digital Library.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA.

Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence, June 1887

Today, in celebration of Lafcadio Hearn’s birthday on June 27th,  we are highlighting pages 5-7 of Letter 24 from our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection. This collection primarily consists of letters written between the years 1840-1896 from Hearn to Page Mercer Baker, a New Orleans newspaper founder, reporter, and editor.

The Lafcadio Hearn was a reporter, writer, wanderer, and world traveler. Born in Greece, he spent a difficult childhood in Dublin Ireland, and England. Hearn then emigrated to the United States, living in Cincinnati, New York, and New Orleans, to eventually be laid to rest in Japan. He is a truly fascinating literary figure known not only for his writing about the underbelly of life, African American culture, Japanese ghost stories, and the macabre but also for his life spent as an outsider and traveler.

The letter was written in the month of June in 1887 days before he traveled from New York City to Trinidad aboard the Barracouta on an assignment for Harper’s Magazine. The resulting article “Midsummer Trip to The West Indies” appeared in the July 1888 issue of the magazine.

Hearn’s excitement for traveling south towards the climate of New Orleans is obvious as found in the prose of his letter:

“I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O.”

As the letter progresses, Hearn continues writing Baker, conjuring lands beyond his beloved city New Orleans and towards a new landscape that he will encounter as he travels further and closer to the lungs of the world:

“I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world….”

(Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence Collection, Letter 24, pages 5-7)

Below you will find a full transcription of these last 3 pages of the letter wherein Hearn writes to Baker of life and the transcendent qualities of light:

I am writing as usual in a hurry. One day more, Then South. I will pass you by again, and not see you, – but I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O. Then, a few days more and I shall be more than a thousand miles south of you. All the way the sky will deepen it’s blue. – I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world…. After all, I cannot say I feel glad at going. The sensation of belonging to nowhere, – of instability; – nothing solid or certain in life or work or effort, – always comes on one prior to seeking a strange latitude. You understand, as by some sudden revelation, what a monstrous whirl of dust and light all life is, and that you are but one atom of the eddy, – may be laid here, there, anywhere, – to rest a little, to struggle a little, or to shine a moment in the light; but sooner or later all the motes float into the darkness and the silence forever. Before, it will be some consolation to have seen what makes life and thought, – Light, in the most splendid aspect it can offer to human eyes.

Please don’t show my letter to anyone, outside Toledano and Prytania corner, – so that I can write to you just as I want

Always with love to you,

Lafcadio Hearn


You can find this letter in its entirety along with others in our Digital Library or come and view the complete Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection in person Monday through Friday 9:00 – 4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Bonus Info: Follow these links to enjoy a fascinating 2-part radio documentary produced by RTE Lyric FM in Dublin, Ireland and learn more about Hearn’s life and work.

SCA’s Newest Detective

In 1962, Domingo performed with the New Orleans Opera House Association for the first time as Lord Arturo Bucklaw. This was only his second performance in America (after his U.S. debut at the Dallas Civic Opera)! In this same program, is one of the shortest "artist bios" ever to be written under his now internationally famous name. Come and see it for yourself when you visit us in the SCA (third floor of Monroe Library)!

One of my more exciting projects this summer is working in the Loyola Special Collections & Archives department at Monroe Library. I first learned how to navigate a library via the Dewey Decimal System during my kindergarten year at Hynes Elementary School in Lakeview. There is nothing quite like the thrill of researching, seeking, and finding sources in the library. Those moments when you get lost in shelves because there are more books than you thought there would be on your topic or even a topic you had not considered; the sounds of silence; the scents of the books…I could go on forever about the joys of ‘the library’! Monroe Library at Loyola is an unforgettable one. There has always been a special little place in my heart, where I’ve imagined myself a librarian. Here I am. Tucked away on the third floor, in a quiet and magical place is: The Special Collections and Archives Department. I was hired to take on this part time position as a student worker and am receiving a music industry internship credit. The people I work with are as lovely as they are intelligent (and librarians are very smart, duh!). We all wear sweaters not because sweaters complete the “adorable librarian” look, but because most of the collections in our in our department are extremely old and in order to best preserve them, temperatures are set very low.

Floyd is famous for his operatic composition of Susannah (an opera in two acts). The composer wrote Susannah and Markheim essentially for the specific voice and character of international and local star Norman Treigle. The world premiere of Markheim took place in March 1966 after Treigle insisted it happen in his hometown of New Orleans! The performance captured national coverage and was a huge success.

My journey in the archives began and will end with the New Orleans Opera Association. My primary job this summer is to search through the extensive New Orleans Opera Association archives and find interesting photos, documents, programs, etc. to display in the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit coming this Fall 2016! What seemed a daunting and vague task (as SA&C has almost 100 boxes of NOOA historical content) has turned into one of the most interesting and exciting research projects I’ve ever encountered! The timeline I am working with is from February 1943 – the beginning of the New Orleans Opera House Association – to the early 2000′s. This collection is over flowing with unique photographs, hand painted or sketched set designs, amusing correspondence, quaint scrapbooks, and reel to reel recordings of performances as old at 1947!

This watercolor set design of a 1966 production of Carmen is one of many hand painted or sketched plans in the NOOA collection. It is most fascinating to hold up the planned set next to the realized black and white photo of the stage!

A single page from one of the NOOA Women's Opera Guild Scrapbooks. The twenty-fifth anniversary season of the NOOHA was all about the big names in opera. For this particularly spectacular performance, Tito Capobianco staged an inventive production of Les Contes d'Hoffmann, featuring Beverly Sills (pictured here), John Alexander, and Norman Treigle.

Arthur G. Cosenza

This is my Grandfather. He is one of my most favorite people and he was active with the New Orleans Opera Association for over thirty-five years. From the 1953-54 season as a supporting baritone role; through the 60′s, 70′s, and 80′s as stage and/or artistic director; and from 1998 until his death in 2005 he served as the Emeritus Director of the association. What a handsome guy! Though he always told me, “Everyone looks better when they’re younger.”

This project has only just begun. I am looking forward to another month in the Monroe Library researching, seeking, and finding…

Written by Student Worker and Intern, Gloria S. Cosenza.

Annual Reviews outage June 24, 2016

The Annual Reviews web site will be down for maintenance on Friday, June 24, 2016 beginning at 5:00 pm Central Time and lasting four hours.  During that time, you will be unable to retrieve full-text articles or do any searching.