Color Our Collections Week!

It is Color Our Collections week! A week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Organized by the New York Academy of Medicine and happening from February 1st through the 5th.

Follow this LINK to download, print, and color images from volume one of British zoologist John Gould’s publication The Birds of Great Britain.

HoneyBuzzard

Once you’ve colored your picture(s) share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

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Today also happens to be the 135th anniversary of John Gould’s death. Gould was a British zoologist active throughout the mid-19th century and known chiefly for the over 3000 hand colored lithographs that he produced throughout his career. The first volume of The Birds of Great Britain, can be found in Special Collections & Archives at Loyola’s Monroe Library and online as part of our digital collections.

Follow these links to explore some of the other institutions participating in Color Our Collections Week and happy coloring!

See Also: More Libraries Participating in Color Our Collections Week

Blackboard Unavailable 2/8/16

The Blackboard system will be undergoing software updates on Monday, February 8th (the Monday before Mardi Gras day) from 7am – midnight. Please plan your use of the system with this schedule in mind, taking into account the likelihood that Blackboard will not be accessible during those hours. In addition, keep in mind that the library will be closed February 6th -10th.

Special Collections: James Joyce

Today marks the 134 birthday of James Joyce, and on the 22nd it will be the 94th anniversary of the first full publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses, by publisher and famous bookstore owner Sylvia Beach.

First published in installments by The Little Review starting in March of 1918, the book takes place over the course of one day, June 16, 1920. This day is now celebrated as Bloomsday, named after the protagonist of the book, Leopold Bloom.

Reading the book is a goal for many though it is a book few complete. To quote the New York Times review by Dr. Joseph Collins, “Not ten men or women out of a hundred can read Ulysses through [...] I am probably the only person, aside from the author, that has ever read it twice from beginning to end.” It does however have a benefit for those who finish it, as Collins purports, “I have learned more psychology and psychiatry from it than I did in ten years at the Neurological Institute.”

In celebration of James Joyce’s birthday and to illustrate our love of difficult but rewarding books, we offer you a preview of some of our more unique tiles by and about Joyce from our collections.

James Joyce, a critical introduction, by Harry Levin.

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An exagmination of James Joyce; analyses of the “Work in progress”, by Samuel Beckett, Marcel Brion, Frank Budgen and others…

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Pomes penyeach / by James Joyce.

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Recollections of James Joyce / by his brother Stanislaus Joyce ; translated from the Italian by Ellsworth Mason.

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Yes… these titles are available for research in the Special Collections & Archives Booth-Bricker Reading Room Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 4:30 PM.

Wireless Projection

Would you like to use your laptop in a classroom with no strings attached? We have a device that will allow you to project from your laptop wirelessly! Plus, it will allow up to 4 laptops to project a “quad screen” so that both you and your students can project simultaneously. You can also connect iOS and Android devices with some limited functionality – images only. Contact Media Services, mediasrv@loyno.edu or x7120, to set up a demo.

Lunch at Tujague’s in 1945

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Cover

One of the fascinating things about reading through someone’s personal papers are the minute details you uncover. One such example is from this scrapbook, inscribed “Florida 1945 Ado + Neva” on the cover.

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Page 37

Maude Lehman Liersch (1895-1977) assembled this scrapbook to document several trips she took with her husband Joe, a physician and son of one of Kansas City’s pioneer druggists. The bulk of the scrapbook is taken up by a road trip the Lierschs took with friends Adolph “Ado” or “Otto” F.  (1884-1961) and Neva  Wiedenmann Seidel (1890-1979) from October 27-November 9, 1945. The quartet began in their hometown of Kansas City, Missouri and circled the Midwestern, Southeastern, and Southwestern United States. Destinations included Springfield, MO; Memphis and Chattanooga, Tennessee; Tifton, Georgia;  Melbourne, Key West, Fort Myers, Sulphur Spring, Silver Springs, and Pensacola, Florida; New Orleans and Thibodeaux, Louisiana; Houston, Texas; and Mena, Arkansas. Maude took detailed notes of all food and beverage as well as prices for their accommodations. In her entry for their visit to New Orleans, she writes:

Tuesday, Nov. 6 – 1945

Left at 5:20 a.m. Went through Bankhead tunnel under Mobile river at Mobile, Ala. 25c – Had breakfast at Mobile at Toddle House. Waffle and ham – Service was poor as changed shifts – boys left and girls came on. Joe and I did not get coffee. Stopped at Biloxi for sweet rolls and coffee – Very good. Reached New Orleans 10:50 a.m. Took a guide $2.00 each – all over old part of New Orleans as well as new. Had lunch at 2 o’clock at “Tujague’s” – soup, meat, lettuce, roast beef, cauliflower, hard bread, cream puff, coffee. Had coffee and donuts at old market. Went on wharf where were unloading coffee from Brazil and then conducted over U.S. Mississippi. Berries from a camphor tree in cemetery. Detour to Thibodeaux - French people – stayed at Dixie Hotel. Almost did not get a place to stay. Each had a room – just wash stand in room. $2.00 couple. Ate in Hotel. Asked if wished French drip or Maxwell House coffee. Walked around town – Bought clothespins 25c doz. Night at Thibodeaux. One of the first trading posts between New Orleans, and country along Teche Bayou. Adjacent to oil field.

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Page 38

Tujague’s, est. 1856, is the second oldest restaurant in the French Quarter. A look at their current menu shows many of the same dishes Maude ate.

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Page 40

Perennial Special Collections favorite The Bachelor in New Orleans (published in 1942) described Tujague’s as “an old timey drinkery that pays little attention to fashion in bars. Here you will find no red leather bar stools, no super-duper fixtures. Here is drink served in the way and in the surroundings your father drank it. Specialty of the house is the Absinthe frappe.”

This scrapbook is part of the Anthony Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary Collection and is currently on display in our exhibit Media Traditions:  Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation along with other scrapbooks that draw correlations between memory archives of the past and contemporary modes of self-presentation. Portions of the exhibit are view-able from the Monroe Library 3rd floor hallway and the rest are in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections and Archives Reading Room, open Monday – Friday 9am-4:30pm.

More Mardi Gras archives

Looking for more historic Mardi Gras miscellany? Then check out our previous blog post about The Collection of New Orleans Miscellany which contains an invitation to the 1882 Independent Order of the Moon (I.O.O.M.) ball.

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sca003_Miscellany

The blog post can be read in its entirety here, or come see us in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room to find out more about this collection.

Exhibit: The Golden Ratio

Currently on view in the Library Living Room (Room 101):

The Golden Ratio
An Analogical Study of Creation
Linda Hexter, ‘16

From the artist’s statement:

My portfolio consists of eleven pairs of silver gelatin prints. The photo on the left in each pair displays an appearance of the Golden Ratio in divine creation. This includes the environment, animals, and the human body. The picture on the right presents an appearance of the Golden Ratio in man’s creation. This includes logo design, artwork, musical instruments, etc. I argue that the Golden Ratio appears in all of creation, and all of creation can be described by applying the ratio in the following manner:
creation/(divine creation)=ϕ=(divine creation)/(human creation)
I believe that the artist’s goal is to recreate nature’s divine beauty. Man’s limitations will allow only imperfect representations of the Golden Ratio to exist in art and architecture. This is why there is so much debate over whether or not the Golden Ratio exists in things like the Parthenon and the Mona Lisa. Humans attempt to use God’s mathematical tool to imitate natural beauty and leave our own mark of beauty in this world. This thesis is my attempt to create art with and about the Golden Ratio in order to shed light on our innate search for divine structure and beauty.

“Look on earth and sky and sea…they have forms because they have numbers: take these away, they will be nothing. And even human artificers, makers of all corporeal forms, have numbers in their art to which they fit their works; and they move hands and tools in the fashioning till that which is formed outside, carried back to the light of numbers which is within, so far as may be attains perfection, and through the mediating sense pleases the inner judge looking upon the heavenly numbers.”
–St. Augustine of Hippo

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Collection Spotlight: Carnival

It’s Mardi Gras season, meaning it’s the perfect time to highlight some of Special Collections & Archives’ Mardi Gras collections.

1899 Proteus Invitation

1899 Proteus Invitation

1899 Proteus Invitation, side 2

1899 Proteus Invitation, side 2

The New Orleans Carnival Collection is an artificial collection informally collected over time. New Orleans has been celebrating Mardi Gras since the mid 19th century. Private organizations, known as krewes, sponsor annual public parades and private balls. This collection consists of the ball programs and some invitations to these events produced by various krewes from the 1870s through to the 1970s.

1880 Comus admittance card

1880 Comus admittance card

While the collection contains materials related to Mardi Gras Super Krewes like Rex and Comus, it also contains ball miscellany from several historically black krewes.

1977 Original Illinois Club ball program

1977 Original Illinois Club ball program

1969 Young Men Illinois Club ball program

1969 Young Men Illinois Club ball program

The Original Illinois Club, formed by Pullman porters in 1894 in response to the whites-only krewes of New Orleans, was the first black carnival organization. The Young Men Illinois Club split from the Original and formed in 1927. The Illinois Clubs, along with the Beau Brummell Club, Plantation Revelers, and the Bunch Club, were created to sponsor traditional, invitation-only balls for presenting young black debutantes. Subsequent black krewes included the Capetowners (1935), the Plantation Revelers (1939),  the Dunbar Club (1946), and the Bon Temps (1947).

1970 Plantation Revelers ball program

1970 Plantation Revelers ball program

1970 Dunbar Club ball program

1970 Dunbar Club ball program

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970 Bon Temps ball program

1970 Bon Temps ball program

You can see more images from this collection in this previous blog post. For more information about the history of black New Orleanians and Mardi Gras, see New Orleans on parade : tourism and the transformation of the crescent cityThe Mardi Gras Indians : the ethnomusicology of black associations in New Orleans, The “Baby Dolls” : breaking the race and gender barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras tradition, Lords of misrule : Mardi Gras and the politics of race in New Orleans, and Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

This collection and the books listed above are available for research use in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room on the 3rd floor of the library Monday – Friday, 9am-4:30pm.

Seminar 1 has a Touch Screen!

Did you know that the big TV in Library Seminar 1 (Room 129) is a touch screen? You can annotate your computer image, or create a whiteboard using your finger as the marker. You can also save whatever you create. There are lots more functions, too. Contact Media Services, mediasrv@loyno.edu or x7120, to set up a demo.

Media Traditions: Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation

Loyola University Special Collections & Archives proudly presents Media Traditions: Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation.

On view in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room, the exhibit draws correlations between memory archives of the past and contemporary modes of self-presentation.

Collections included within the exhibit are the Anthony Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary CollectionBen C. Toledano New Orleans CollectionBasil Thompson Papers, and University Publications Collection.

We sincerely hope that you join us on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library this semester! Special Collections & Archives is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.