Collection Spotlight: Ecology Center of Louisiana, Inc., Papers

The Ecology Center of Louisiana, a private, non-profit organization headquartered in New Orleans, collected and disseminated information on Louisiana’s environmental problems and emphasized public participation in resolution of those problems. The Ecology Center, most active between 1970 and 1983, was founded in 1969 around a kitchen table by a group of environmentally conscious citizens. Among them was J. Ross Vincent, a research chemical engineer from Wilmington, Delaware, who would go on to lead the Center for more than a decade.

Center services included a monthly newsletter, lectures and panel discussions on environmental subjects, assistance to schools and teachers in the development of environmental curricula, Louisiana’s first recycling program, an environmental library and hot-line, radio and television programs and lobbying of city, state and federal government representatives. Over time, the Ecology Center became an established resource called upon for expertise and guidance by environmentalists, politicians, business people, students and interested citizens.

Run by a board of directors made up of community members, the Ecology Center was assisted by a professional and volunteer staff and a Board of Advisors, which included the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, two U.S. Congressmen, an Assistant State Attorney General and various other government officials. During one of its busiest periods in early 1971, there were 146 people associated with the Ecology Center, including 131 paying members and 101 active volunteers. To fund its activities, the Center depended almost entirely on the support of its members and on private contributions from concerned citizens and businesses.

Issues and events on which the Center had an impact include limiting the use of the fire ant pesticide Mirex, the first Earth Day celebration in Louisiana, the implementation of the Federal Clean Air Act in Louisiana, public awareness of issues for the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, environmentally conscious urban planning, air pollution, construction of a deep draft oil terminal off of the Louisiana coast, the Waterford Nuclear Power Plant in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, public parks, water and air quality management, and regional transportation planning.

Scope and Content

The arrangement of the Ecology Center of Louisiana papers is largely based on the inventory of creator, J. Ross Vincent. However, a portion of the original subject files was integrated in the interest of cohesiveness. Papers document the activities of the Ecology Center through founding records, correspondence, articles and newsletters on environmental issues from its founding in 1969 until 1987 when J. Ross Vincent, the Center’s president and co-founder moved out of state. The predominant topics of conversation involve environmental issues affecting the state of Louisiana, the support for or opposition to environmental legislation and litigation, and the seeking or dispensing of environmental information.

Papers demonstrate that the Ecology Center was able to establish credibility with government agencies, the business community, organizations of concerned citizens and the public regarding environmental issues that directly affected the state of Louisiana and its inhabitants.

Other than general administrative papers and correspondence, papers are predominately divided by environmental subjects, including Air Pollution, Chemicals, Water Pollution and Coastal Zone Management, Land Use, Transportation, Solid Waste, Energy, Law and Litigation and Organizations, Conferences and Newsletters. Within each of the subjects, there is additional correspondence between the Ecology Center and concerned citizens, environmentalists and politicians. The collection includes information on a broad range of important environmental issues, as well as evidence of efforts by the Ecology Center and the impact of the Center to effect some change for the betterment of the environment.

Finally, the collection includes publications collected by and related to the organization.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy Birthday, J.M. Barrie!

J.M. Barrie, best known as the author and creator of Peter Pan, was born on this day in 1860. Pictured is our 1st edition copy of Barrie’s lesser known 1891 work The Little Minister.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Faculty Search Announcement: Instruction and Research Coordinator

To apply: Email letter of application, resume, and 3-5 references with contact information to:
Deborah Poole, Dean of Libraries

Submissions must be submitted in pdf or MS Word format.
Application deadline is May 16, 2016.
Loyola University’s Monroe Library is located in beautiful uptown New Orleans, facing Audubon Park and the historic streetcar line. Loyola University is a Catholic institution that emphasizes the Jesuit tradition of educating the whole person.  The Monroe Library has been consistently ranked as one of the Best College Libraries by Princeton Review. Loyola University offers a generous vacation and competitive benefits package for full-time employees.
Loyola University is an AA/EOE employer.

Loyola University New Orleans
Job Description: Instruction and Research Coordinator
J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library

Title of Position: Instruction and Research Coordinator

College: University Library                               Date Written: 2011, revised 2016

I.       SUMMARY OF POSITION

This a full-time 12-month, tenure-track member faculty position. The Instruction and Research Coordinator leads the library’s instruction program and the strategic planning and assessment of information literacy learning outcomes; develops and offers research and technology instruction to the Loyola community; promotes the integration of information literacy throughout the curricula; coordinates the Teaching and Learning Team, including the library’s liaison program.

II.      ORGANIZATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Responsible to: Dean of Libraries

Assignments received from: Dean of Libraries and library teams

Interacts with: Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community; library teams and university committees; university departments and offices; colleagues and professionals in the field

Nature of Supervision: Meets regularly with the Dean of Libraries

Nature of supervision given and individual(s) or groups supervised: Supervises, mentors, and trains library faculty, staff, and student employees as needed

III.    DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

A.          Essential Functions

1.   Leads strategic planning and assessment of the library’s instruction program.

Provides vision and sets priorities for the Teaching and Learning Team to align with the Library’s and the University’s strategic goals. Works with Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum to develop information literacy learning goals and assess outcomes in the Loyola Core.

2.   Coordinates and provides information literacy and technology instruction.

Promotes efforts to integrate information literacy into assignments, courses, and throughout curricula. Collaborates with Media Services, Learning Commons, Special Collections & Archives, and Online Learning Team regarding instruction. Maintains the library instruction teaching schedule and classroom reservations.

3.   Leads the Library’s active liaison program to partner with teaching faculty on information literacy, research support, collection development, and the use of information resources. Facilitates collaboration between the Teaching and Learning Team and the Information Resources Team.

4.   Develops a community of practice among the library instructors. Creates internal and external opportunities for professional development regarding instruction.

5.   Provides, coordinates and assesses reference and research services, including the AJCU chat service.

6.   Participates in local, regional, and national library instruction communities.

Keeps current with trends and fosters awareness of new developments in research, instruction, scholarship and technology trends in order to integrate them into the library’s practice and planning.

7.   Serves as a liaison to designated academic departments and centers on campus. Serves as liaison to the Honors program. Engages in collection development that supports teaching and learning in liaison departments.

8.   Serves on library and university teams and committees. Serves as the library’s representative on the Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum.

9.   Engages with area high schools  and community partners to promote information literacy, lifelong learning, and academic libraries.

10. Fulfills expectations for promotion and tenure, including scholarship.

B. Additional Responsibilities

1.   Participates in professional development to enhance skills and knowledge; attends professional meetings and conferences.

2.   Identifies grant opportunities and works collaboratively to create proposals in support of library instruction.

IV.       QUALIFICATIONS

A.  Required Education, Experience, Skills and Abilities

1.   Master of Library Science or equivalent degree from an American Library Association accredited school.

2.   Minimum of two (2) years experience in an academic library related to instruction, reference, and liaison services.

3.   Teaching experience, including information literacy, technology instruction, or instructional design. Knowledge of the concepts articulated in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Demonstrated knowledge of student learning outcomes assessment.

4.   Demonstrated leadership skills and experience in planning, implementing and assessing library initiatives.

5.   Experience supervising and mentoring.

6.   Excellent interpersonal skills, including the ability to foster a diverse and collegial work environment that encourages innovation.

7.   Demonstrated skills and experience in collaborating within and outside the library to develop and deliver quality service.

8.   Ability to balance varied responsibilities; demonstrated ability to work in an active learning environment and juggle multiple tasks.

9.   Ability to develop and create online tutorials, guides, and other learning objects.

10. Potential to meet the requirements for promotion and tenure, including evidence of contributions to the scholarship of librarianship or teaching and learning.

B.        Additional Desirable Qualifications

1.   Familiarity with information literacy assessment tools.

2.   Experience developing tutorials, research guides, and other learning objects.

3.   Experience with teaching online.

4.   Experience with Blackboard or other course management software.

5.   Additional advanced degree.

#minibookmonday

Today’s mini book is Historia de la Florida by Inca Garcilaso de la Vega.

Only 13cm tall, this little three volume edition was published in 1803 in Madrid. Originally published in 1604, Historia de la Florida tells the story of Hernando De Soto’s exploration of Florida in the 16th century.

Collection Spotlight: Robert Giroux Papers, Christina Stead Correspondence

Today we look at correspondence between Harcourt, Brace & Co. and Christina Stead as one of the many examples within our Robert Giroux Papers illustrating the behind-the-scenes world of the publishing industry.

Robert Giroux (1914-2008) was an award-winning American editor who worked for Harcourt, Brace & Co. and Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., where he was a vice president, partner (as of 1963), editor-in-chief,  director, and chairperson of the board of editors.

Christina Stead (1902-1983) was an Australian writer of short stories and novels and is considered one of Australia’s greatest writers and is most well-known for her novel The Man Who Loved Children (1940).

The correspondence featured here concerns her book A Little Tea, A Little Chat (1948), a story of an middle aged American scoundrel during World War II who seduces and betrays women.

Robert Giroux Papers

In the correspondence we find that the book’s sales have dwindled and Harcourt, Brace & Co. are offering her both the remaining copies and the plates from which the book was struck at a discount.

Robert Giroux Papers

Robert Giroux Papers

This is only a taste of what will prove to be an exciting research collection.

This collection’s status is currently in processing, but is available for research with an appointment at the Special Collections & Archives in Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans, M-F 9:00-4:30.

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Here is a little something extra! A program about Christina Stead from Radio National: The Character And Situation Of Christina Stead.

Egypt: Descriptive, Historical, and Picturesque

Today we take a look at volume 2 of a 2 volume set Egypt: Descriptive, Historical, and Picturesque.

We are sharing with you the 2nd volume, since volume 1 is much more fragile. Luckily it has been digitized and is available via Rice University’s The Travelers in the Middle East Archive (TIMEA) and through the Internet Archive.

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This book was compiled and written by Professor George Mortiz Ebers and translated by Clara Bell. Ebers was a German Egyptologist and writer (1837 –1898). Clara Bell (1834–1927) was a translator best know for her translation of the 90-volume work  The Human Comedy by Honoré de Balzac. Heavily illustrated, with over 400 images, with gilt edges. It is a large book at 387 pages and measuring 12 1/4″ x 15″ making the digitization of it a joy not only of access but for its ease of use.

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Today we offer you a selection of images (all of the artists are credited at the front of each volume) from the book with corresponding links to modern images, additional information, and locations of the sites.

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Located here. Also, a modern day image of the temple. It is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Image of Sekhmet statues near the Temple of Mut in Karnak, located here.

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Come check out this or one of our other rare books housed in the Special Collections & Archives at Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans, M-F 9-4:30.

The Anatomy Of Melancholy

First published in 1621, The Anatomy of Melancholy was subsequently repeatedly expanded by its author Robert Burton (an Oxford don who also worked in the Oxford Library) 6 more times during his lifetime. His work in the library is informative in that The Anatomy of Melancholy is a book of many books, filled with citations, quotations, and interpretations of various specialists.

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Robert Burton is pictured (above) holding a book.

Burton, as described in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature, was “subject to depression of spirits” and wrote the book as an “antidote” for his own melancholy. A su generis work that covers much more territory than to just anatomize melancholy (though it is a dissection of it), it is a book that seeks to explain human emotions, and is a compendia of printed knowledge and science of the time.

It is composed of three parts:

First Partition = Causes of Melancholy

Second Partition = The Cure of Melancholy

Third Partition = Love Melancholy and Religious Melancholy

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The book is rooted in the dominate Greek Medicine theory of Humoralism. Within this theory, melancholy (clinical depression) is attributed to black bile, one of the Four Humors.

The Four Humors and their corresponding qualities:

Blood = Sanguine = Spring = hot and moist

Yellow Bile = Choleric = Summer = hot and dry

Black Bile = Melancholic = Autumn = cold and dry

Phlegm = Phlegmatic = Winter = cold and moist

Galen of Pergamon theories on the Humoral System of medicine influenced Western medicine for over a century. His theory of the Four Humors consisted of a holistic system that drew upon the Platonic philosophy of the relationship between the mind and the body. These fluids ran all through the body and where all thought to be present in the blood. For instance, if you poured a person’s blood into a glass, it would (theoretically) separate into these four fluids. These fluids and their corresponding temperaments (mind-body connections) need to be in balance for health, while disease occurs when they are out of balance. Treatments like blood letting, purging, vomiting, and food sought to bring the humors back into equilibrium.

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Burton wrote, and rewrote, The Anatomy of Melancholy as a treatment for his own struggles with depression. The fact that he revised and expanded the work with six published editions is a testament to his obsessiveness regarding the process and the need to “write of melancholy by being busy to avoid melancholy”.

We have two different editions here in the Special Collections and Archives and you can also find it online in full-text. It is a fascinating book that is satirical and serious and of a time when scholars wrote and read across the disciplines of science, medicine, and philosophy.

And here’s a little something extra: A BBC Radio IN OUR TIME  broadcast on the book.

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival 2016

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival

Today all of New Orleans is abuzz with excitement. The day that locals, tourists, and jazz enthusiasts alike have all been (rather impatiently) waiting for has finally arrived, and the entrance gates of the New Orleans Fair Grounds are spread wide to welcome us to the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival!

A Brief History

In 1970, jazz impressario George Wein was hired to create a festival unique to the city of New Orleans, LA. When announcing the inaugural festival, Wein said,”The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival represents a new and exciting idea in festival presentation. This festival could only be held in New Orleans because here and here alone is the richest musical heritage in America.”

The 1970 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival brought together the likes of Mahalia Jackson, Duke Ellington, Pete Fountain, Al Hirt, Clifton Chenier, Fats Domino, The Meters, The Preservation Hall Band, parades every day with The Olympia Brass Band and Mardi Gras Indians among others. Although only 350 people attended the first “Jazz Fest,” the festival quickly developed into a cultural event synonymous with the spirit of New Orleans.

By 1972, the event had outgrown the confines of Congo Square and relocated to the New Orleans Fair Grounds (the 3rd oldest racetrack in the United States). Two years later, the festival introduced its first limited-edition silkscreen poster, now produced annually and recognized as the most popular poster series in the world.

The 1990′s saw the popularity and significance of Jazz Fest soar–the New York Times would write that the festival had “become inseparable from the culture it presents,” and in 2001, the Jazz Fest celebrated the centennial of Louis Armstrong with a total of over 650,000 attendees.

The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival annually hosts a blend of local talent and internationally renown performers and “continues to celebrate the culture of Louisiana with the combined fervor of a gospel hymn and the joy of a jazz parade.”

Happy Jazz Fest, Wolf Pack!

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Check out our digital archive of the school newspaper, the Loyola University Maroon, here.

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Knowledge of the World by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Knowledge of the World

Frédéric Bruly Bouabré

Atlanta: Nexus Press, 1998.

(Edition of 200)

Knowledge of the World consists of 200 loose-leaf artist cards featuring color reproductions of work produced by prolific Ivorian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré (c. 1923-2014).

Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

SCA on the Graham Norton Show

You never know who is going to want to use Special Collections & Archives materials. Last week we were contacted by a researcher for the Graham Norton Show about using an image from our digitized pamphlet Florence Foster Jenkins: An Appreciation (previously blogged about here). Jenkins is the subject of an upcoming film starring Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant, and the Graham Norton Show used an image from our digitized pamphlet in their interview with Streep. Watch the clip and see the image below:

The interview aired last Friday, April 15.

We’re always excited to find out who is using our collections–thanks to the Graham Norton Show for reaching out to us!