Now Hiring: Learning Technologies Developers

Learning Technologies Developer – University Library (2 openings)

The Learning Technologies Developer will plan, create, implement, and support media and web content to enhance student and faculty learning. This position is responsible for the successful implementation and enhancement of digital content affiliated with the library’s Blackboard, teaching, and learning initiatives, as well as backend maintenance and support for content delivery and management systems.

The Learning Technologies Developer works to enhance how faculty and students utilize technology and online learning tools to increase active learning, refine critical thinking and communications skills, and develop information and media fluencies. Oversee media and application production services that support teaching and learning at Loyola.

Qualifications: Completion of an undergraduate degree required; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with faculty, staff, students and others; ability to work productively in a team environment; excellent organizational and project management skills; must have in depth knowledge of computer operating systems, web browsers; demonstrated proficiency with MS Office, video and audio editing, webpage creation, and other applications such as Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Final Cut, etc.; experience with object-oriented programming and/or scripting languages; experience producing digital or web-based instructional materials and streaming media; experience working in an academic environment preferred; experience developing and conducting training sessions preferred; experience with Adobe Flash, web programming languages such as CSS & XML, and Blackboard or other LMS (Learning Management System(s).

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.

#howtoTuesday: Loyola style

Today’s #howtoTuesday(s) come from the Maroon newspaper, which has been distributing sage advice to our students for 91 years.

First up is how to buy your books from the bookstore:

then, how to succeed in Basketball:

Finally, we have “How to Succeed in College Without Really Trying,” a board game!

***Don’t lose points by not knowing where the library is!

Looking for more lessons from the University Archives? Come see us on the 3rd floor of the library in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

From Fang to Havoc: Loyola’s mascot

Loyola’s wolf mascot has been around since the early years of the university, but it hasn’t always been smooth sailing. The original mascot was an actual wolf cub, beloved by athletic teams and the student body. But after a disappointing year  in 1928, the wolf cub was ostracized by the football team.

1929-11-22 Maroon

Still, by 1932, the now fully grown wolf continued to be seen at Loyola athletic events.

1932-11-23 Maroon

In 1957, a new mascot was introduced in the form of a ferocious  “almost Cocker” puppy. Cheerleader Gerry Bodet held a contest to name the new mascot, and Fang was born.

1957 Wolf Yearbook

1957-02-08 Maroon

In 1966 the university once again adopted a real wolf–this time, a Canadian wolf cub.

1966 Wolf Yearbook

1966 Wolf Yearbook

But drama struck once again. Fang was donated to the Audubon Zoo in 1968, and by 1972 was “missing.”

1974-11-14 Maroon

That seems to have been the end of Loyola’s attempts to keep a live wolf as a mascot, despite rumors to the contrary in 1976 and 1986.

Our present-day mascot was named in 2006 by the ‘Pack Pride Committee as part of a marketing campaign to attract students to athletic events. And Havoc has been with us ever since.

More images like these can be found in Loyola’s digital collections and in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Christmas at Loyola, 1950-1970

Christmas tree decorating

Once again, it’s almost time for Loyola students, faculty, and staff to take leave campus for winter break. As in years past, let’s take a look at Loyola students celebrating Christmas throughout the school’s history.

Santa and children

Santa driving bus with children

Christmas carol singing

Christmas carol singing

Christmas carol singing

Students with snowy car

Students with snowy car

Snowy nativity scene in front Marquette Hall

These photos and more like them can be found in the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. Have a wonderful break, and come visit Special Collections & Archives in 2015.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Now hiring: Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Part Time

Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Part Time – University Library

The Special Collections & Archives Assistant collaborates with library faculty and staff in Special Collections & Archives duties, including reference assistance, processing of collections, digitization, exhibit preparation, and preservation activities on a part-time basis. The ideal candidate will demonstrate skills in project management, customer-focused service, team collaboration, and have an interest in archival description and digitization. The position is temporary, and expires in December 2015.

Qualifications: B.A. degree, or equivalent; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with colleagues and patrons; ability to work productively in a team environment; computer skills in an online, multi-tasking environment; high degree of accuracy and focus concerning complex, detailed work; collaborative and creative problem-solving ability; ability to manage multiple projects in a time sensitive environment.

Highly desirable qualifications include at least two years of library or archival experience and/or MLS; experience working in an academic library; experience with digitization and/or exhibit preparation; experience with online collection management system, such as ARCHON.

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.

New Orleans Traffic: Then and Now

Our how-to today is inspired by A traffic survey of New Orleans metropolitan area, 1944-1945. This report located in the stacks of our Special Collections & Archives was produced in a time before I-10 existed and when the main airport for New Orleans was located on Lake Pontchartrain.

Be you on foot, driving a car, biking or taking a city bus… Traffic (and getting stuck in it), is (and was) inevitable. Whether it’s the junction of I-10 and 90 around the New Orleans landmark, the Superdome, trying to get ANYWHERE during Mardi Gras or navigating the overcrowding of cars and shoppers on Magazine Street…. Everybody gets stuck in traffic.

These days we have traffic information available on our smartphones that automatically re-route us based on real-time geolocation data. In 1944,  these were the results of the timely endeavor of gathering and mapping traffic patterns…

Versus the ease of getting the flow of traffic this morning…

So, how did traffic flow in 1944 New Orleans?

Here is what car traffic looked like…

And transit based traffic…

Currently, a section of I-10 called the Claiborne Expressway is on a list of Freeways Without Futures with active proposals seeking its removal.

This area was once a thriving commercial area and greenbelt that became decentralized through the bisecting of the neighborhood by the interstate.

“Claiborne Avenue: Past, Present, and Future” from Congress for the New Urbanism on Vimeo.

Good luck getting around and a here’s a lagniappe of Ringo Star making sure you take the time to stop and smell the roses!

A traffic survey of New Orleans metropolitan area, 1944-1945 is available for viewing at the Special Collections and Archives, Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30.

21st Amendment Anniversary

This Saturday, December 6, marks the 81st anniversary of the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, which repealed the nationwide prohibition on alcohol.

Image from the National Archives

Beneath the headline “Return of Liquor Taken Quietly by City, Celebrants,” the Times Picayune reported:

Formal prohibition repeal became effective in New Orleans Tuesday night in a surprisingly unobtrusive manner.

A number of private or semi-private “repeal” celebrations were held in homes and clubs, but a glimpse into one of this city’s more popular saloons or larger restaurants Tuesday night would scarcely have indicated that the 13-year drought was just ended.

It was scarcely mentioned in barroom conversation that repeal, one of the most widely discussed questions in American during the past few years, had at last become a fact. An occasional, casual, “Well, Joe, It’s legal now,” was all that as usually heard.

The nonchalant tone of repeal extended to the Loyola Maroon as well. A review of the archived issues shows that the repeal was not mentioned in the student newspaper at all immediately after it’s passage.

In contrast to the calm repeal of prohibition, the passage of the Eighteenth amendment, banning the sale of alcohol in 1919, was a fraught one. Opposing Views: The Battle Among Louisiana’s Urban Newspapers During the Ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment, held in Special Collections and Archives, documents the public battle waged across the state on the issue. Can you guess which side the New Orleans press supported?

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Cookies!

Keep your eyes open for pop-up cookie parties in the library starting on December 8th!

50 years of ballet

1985 Society of Dance

The Loyola Ballet program kicked off its 50th anniversary season last week with its Fall Concert. In 1964, famed New Orleans dancer and choreographer Lelia Haller was asked by Loyola to institutionalize a dance program. Janet Comer and Rene Toups, the first two Loyola dance/drama majors, graduated in 1973.

Lelia Haller

Associate Professor Emerita  Gayle Parmelee succeeded Lelia Haller as Director of the Loyola Ballet in 1978.

Gayle Parmelee

Gayle Parmelee and students

Loyola graduate Laura Zambrano took over direction of the ballet after Gayle Parmelee retired in 1999. Today, it is an award-winning program.

Laura Zambrano and Enrique Martinez, 1981

1997 ballet students

These photos and others can be found in Special Collections & Archives, the Loyola University Photographs Collection, and the digitized Wolf Yearbooks.

Dancer, 1978

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Extended Study Begins December 5th

The Monroe Library’s Extended Study Hours begin this Friday, December 5th. The library will be open continuously starting Friday, December 5th at 7:30 AM and will close Tuesday, December 16th at midnight.

A few things to keep in mind:

  • Starting at midnight each night, the library will be open only to members of the Loyola community. Please be sure bring a valid Loyola ID in order to enter the building. The front doors will be locked, so use the side entrance near the computer lab wing to access the building.
  • Free coffee and tea will be served starting at midnight!
  • Group study rooms cannot be renewed if there are people on the waiting list.
  • Help us make the library conducive to all types of studying: the first floor is great for group study; the second floor is meant for quiet study (whispers only!); and the third floor is reserved for silent study.

This is the first semester we’ll be open continuously for eleven nights straight! (That’s right, we’re even open on Friday and Saturday night.) Love it? Hate it? “Meh” about it? Let us know what you think via our suggestion box.