Let’s Get Physical!

Now that Fall is here and the nice weather is upon us (well, sort of), it’s time to get out there and join your Wolfpack ancestors in getting physical!

See more images of Loyola’s past at Special Collections & Archives University Photographs online.

And, for additional inspiration, some lagniappe:


Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Identifying Microscopic Fungi

When I was looking through our stacks for a special volume to blog about, I came across Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi.

I was initially impressed by the illustrations…

Then, I found written imagery that showed signs of an eccentric at work, which peaked my interest…

Made curious, I did a little research… and found a man with a truly fascinating life!

M.C. Cooke did not have much in the way of a formal education but wrote hundreds of articles and books on botany and mycology. Collected roughly 46, 000 specimens, contributed over 20 years of service to museum collections, while editing journals and founding societies.

Mordecai, was a busy guy!

Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi, is viewable in its entirety at the Internet Archive online, or by visiting the Special Collections and Archives anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 – 4:30.

1960s Midterms

It’s the middle of the semester, and for many of you that means midterm exams. Take solace in the fact that Loyola students have been working hard at their exams for over 50 years…

Uh-oh…

Wait, wake up!

Persevere! (And stay awake). Fall Break is just around the corner!

These photos and many more are available in the Loyola University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. Some of our favorites are currently on display in Special Collections & Archives in our Candid Campus exhibit. Stop by between 9 and 4:30pm, Monday – Friday to check it out.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives: Dueling

Today Found in the Archives looks at one of New Orleans’ most peculiar historical practices: Dueling.

Several volumes found in Special Collections and Archives tell the tale, including  Dueling in Old New Orleans by Stuart Landry.

Landry notes that duels were different than simple fights between men, but were social events fought by men of equal standing according to strict rules, known as the Code Duello. Dueling was popular in England, Ireland, and other parts of the American South (indeed, the Code Duello was codified by the Irish in the 1777) but truly thrived in New Orleans society, especially in the early nineteenth century. Landry writes:

In old New Orleans you had to be careful what you said or how you acted. If you criticized the leading soprano at the French Opera or inadvertently spilled a little of your mint julep on the cuff of the gentleman standing next to you at the bar, you might be called upon to expiate these delinquencies on the field of honor. During the 1830s more duals were fought here than in any other city on the world.

Dueling could take several forms. Fencing was a popular early method of battle, and fencing schools sprung up in New Orleans to instruct the city’s gentlemen in the art of rapier fighting. Most fencing schools were located in Exchange Alley, in the French Quarter.

Hartnett T. Kane’s Gentlemen, Swords and Pistols features a chapter on one of New Orleans’ most famous fencing masters, Don José “Pepe” Llulla. A native of the Spanish Balearic Islands, Pepe Llulla had a famous fencing school located in Exchange Alley, as the 1846 New Orleans City Directory shows:

Don Pepe Llulla was legendary in New Orleans, even in his own time. Lafcadio Hearn’s writings about Pepe Llulla and dueling are included in the collection of his writings  Inventing New Orleans. Hearn wrote that “while comparatively few are intimate with him, for he is a reserved man, there is scarcely a citizen who does not know him by name, and hardly a New Orleans urchin who could not tell you  ‘Pepe Llulla is a great duelist.’”

But fencing was not to remain New Orleanians preferred means of settling questions of honor. As Landry notes:

The early duels of New Orleans were fought with rapiers and swords…[b]ut when the Americans poured in to the city they took up dueling enthusiastically, and made it more deadly with the use of knives, pistols rifles and shotguns. With the rapier a slight wound was sufficient enough to satisfy honor, but where shotguns were used one of the duelists was nearly always seriously wounded or killed.

Dueling was not without it’s critics. In 1834 the Association Against Dueling was formed in New Orleans, and laws were passed against it, but the practice continued on through the century. Duels were famously precipitated by the slightest insults, and Landry tells of combat undertaken to preserve the honor of opera singers, “fat” ladies and, strangely, the Mississippi River. Many duels were fought in what is now New Orleans City Park, at a spot still referred to as the “Dueling Oaks”.

When Pepe Llulla died in New Orleans in 1888, the practice of dueling in New Orleans was also at it’s end. Landry states that the last duel under the City Park Oaks met on June 22, 1889.  The pistol duel was quickly broken up by police and the participants arrested, thus marking the end of the Code Duello in New Orleans.

To access any of the sources discussed here, please visit Special Collections & Archives anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 – 4:30.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Memorial Monday, September 26, 1881: New Orleans mourns a president

On Monday September 26, 1881 our 20th President James A. Garfield was laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio after complications from a gunshot wound took his life.  Though the disillusioned Federal office seeker Charles J. Guiteau had attempted to assassinate Garfield on July 2, 1881, it is widely believed that the gunshot wound would not have been fatal and had the medical care of the 1880’s truly understood the correlation between germs and infection.

Though one of the most lavish funerals to date was held in Cleveland, other cities around the country also held funeral rites. New Orleans was one of these cities.

In A history of the proceedings in the city of New Orleans, on the occasion of the funeral ceremonies in honor of James Abram Garfield, late president of the United States, which took place on Monday, September 26th, 1881 these funeral rites are presented in detail.

This volume contains a comprehensive account of the day’s proceedings as it recounts the many ceremonies presented throughout the city. Including transcripts of speeches, sermons, and detailed descriptions of the funerary decorations and the various processions.

One religious service was held at Seaman’s Bethel. A congregation that was located at 2218 Saint Thomas Street, a location that is still in religious service to this day.

In his memorial sermon, Rev. Dr Andrew Jackson (A.J.) Witherspoon, a former Confederate chaplain and founder of church, offered to his congregation of seamen the potential for Garfield’s death at “reuniting North and South, East and West”. His address surmised that Garfield’s goal as president could now be realized in his death  -–to bring peace to a post-civil war United States.

One impromptu river procession, The River’s Homage to The Dead President, recounts the gathering of tugboats adorned by black and white drapery, with whistles eerily echoing as they traveled from Morgan’s Ferry to Canal Street.

This volume is housed in the Special Collections and Archives of the Morgan Library.

There are full text scans available through Internet Archive and Google Books.

#howtotuesday: Creole Cooking

Today’s #howtoTuesday teaches us how to cook classic Creole dishes circa the early 20th century.

The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book has been published periodically since the early 1900s. Special Collections & Archives has the fourth edition, published in 1910.

“The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book is not designed for chefs of cuisines; it has been prepared with special appreciation of the wants of the household and of that immense class of housekeepers who, thrown upon their own resources and anxious to learn, are yet ignorant of the simplest details of good cooking…”

Recipes include classics, like Cafe au Lait, as well as less common dishes, like Stingaree (stingray), “a fish that the Americans laugh at, not dreaming of the possibilities for a delicate dish that lurks within its wings.”

In keeping with the slow food movement, the book also includes lists of seasonal meat and produce as well as menu ideas.

The book has been digitized in full by Cornell University and is available in the Internet Archive. Other editions have also been digitized (1916, 1922).

The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book is available to view in Special Collections & Archives Monday -Friday between 9am and 4:30pm.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Candid Campus Exhibit

Monroe Library’s Special Collections and Archives has a new exhibition on view!

The exhibit takes a candid look at campus life over the last 70 years as told through photographs.

The images on view are only a small sampling of the more than 6,000 that have been digitized and uploaded to the Loyola University Photographs Collection as part of an ongoing project.

If you have any friends or family that are Loyola University alumni (or know anyone with knowledge and memories of Loyola), please share this link to the collection. A simple browse of the images online could potentially help us identify people, places, dates, and events.

The exhibit is open from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday located inside the Monroe Library Special Collections and Archives reading room on the 3rd floor.

Feel free to stop by and take a look!

Greek Life in the 50s and 60s

Sorority recruitment happened at Loyola earlier this month, and fraternity recruitment is going on right now. Our newest batch of digitized photos in the University Photographs Collection includes some of Greek life at Loyola in the 1950s and 1960s.

Sigma Alpha Kappa (SAK)

Alpha Delta Gamma (ADG)

Alpha Delta Gamma (ADG)

Epsilon Kappa Sigma (EKS)

Epsilon Kappa Sigma (EKS)

Homecoming, 1959

BEGGARS (Beta Epsilon Gamma Gamma Alpha Rho Sigma)

ADG (Alpha Delta Gamma), 1962-1963

There are many more photographs in the collection related to fraternities and sororities; just search for “Greek life” or the name of the organization you’re interested in. You can also browse the entire collection for photos which may be unlabeled and leave us a comment at the bottom of the image page.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Constitution Day

Celebrate Constitution Day at the Monroe Library on September 17, 2014.

Need a Textbook? Try Our Reserves

What are reserves?
Physical reserves are materials that professors ask the library to set aside for use by students in their classes. They may do this to make sure that no one student checks out an important book or they may do it to make class materials more widely available.

Where are reserves and when can I use them?
Reserves are shelved behind the library’s Learning Commons desk. Just ask for a reserve book at the desk by the professor’s name and the title of the book, score, CD or DVD. You can use them any time the library is open, up until 15 minutes before closing.

What kinds of things are on reserve?
They may be the actual course textbook, or supplementary materials for the class. They can be books, scores, CDs or DVDs that are owned by the library or owned by the professor and temporarily loaned to the library.

What’s the difference between physical reserves and e-reserves?
If your class is using a whole book, it will be on physical reserve. Book chapters or articles will be scanned and posted under Library Resources in your Blackboard course.

Who decides what goes on reserve?
Your professors! If your professor has not placed a copy of the textbook for your class on reserve, you may ask him or her to do so, or you may request that we ask on your behalf. Sometimes a librarian will pull materials from the library’s collection that are on your syllabus and place them on reserve for your class so the library’s copy will not be stolen or lost.

How do I know if my professor has materials on reserve?
There is a big black binder at the Learning Commons desk that is organized by professor, showing what each professor has on reserve. There should also be a link to a course’s physical reserves under Library Resources in Blackboard.

How long can I check out materials on reserve?
The professor who places the item on reserve decides on the loan period, but it may be 2 hours, 4 hours, or overnight. The 2 hour loan period is the most popular for books, as it allows for more students to use the materials without having to wait. The 4 hour loan period is used for DVDs because most films are longer than 2 hours.

Can I take reserve materials out of the library?
The library holds a student’s Loyola i.d. at the Learning Commons desk while the materials are checked out to ensure that we know what is checked out and so that students are more likely to return the materials on time.

If you need help with Reserves, or if you have questions, please contact Laurie Phillips at 864-7833 or phillips@loyno.edu