Catholic News Archive Demo

Please join the Monroe Library and Jennifer Younger from the Catholic Research Resources Alliance on Tuesday, April 18 at 10am in Seminar Room 4 of the library for a demo of The Catholic News Archive, a freely available digital library of 4,288 issues (and counting!) Catholic newspaper issues from different cities over multiple years. From the Catholic News Archive website,

“Historic Catholic newspapers are an important resource for scholars and researchers. The Catholic Research Resources Alliance is founded and funded by an impressive list of Universities (follow the link for a full list of member institutions).

However, university level uses are not the only extent of use for education. It is our passionate conviction that these historic newspapers can provide motivation for reading and discussion. They are a vast, diverse and primary source documents that can:

  • Connect students to recent history.
  • Make learning fun!
  • Offer flexibility and adaptability to all curriculum areas and grade levels.
  • Bridget the gap between the classroom and the “real’ world.
  • Give everyone something that’s interesting for them to ready (news, sports, weather, editorials, and comics).

Design lessons with relevant interactive digital activities to engage learners while creating historical awareness. Foster and facilitate independent learners using free and open source electronic resources to strengthen Catholic identity.”

Please join us to learn more about this valuable resource!

What: The Catholic News Archive demo

Where: Monroe Library Seminar Room 4 (2nd floor)

When: Tuesday, April 18 at 10am

Happy April Fools’ Day!

It’s April Fool’s Day — a day to make jokes and pull harmless gags.

The Loyola University New Orleans Maroon is no stranger to pulling a joke on its readers. Throughout the years, The Maroon — or should I say, The Moron — has published issues riddled with gag articles.

In 1932, The April Fools’ issue of the Moron is in no short supply of laugh-worthy articles. One that stands out in particular being “University Adds Hop-Scotchers to Sports List” because “It is high time that Loyola entered in the field of major sports…”

The front page headline of the April 1, 1966 Moron reads, “Sicard Named Dean of MEN; Jolly Elated.” The article features quips from Mrs. Mary Sicard and Father Homer Jolly. 

image

The 1931 issue of the Moron takes a somewhat darker spin on April Fools. The front page story tells of two professors at Loyola who had been found “shot” and goes into detail on how Scotland Yard was sending over “the redoubtable Sherlock Holmes, ably assisted by his aide-de-camp, the well-known Dr. Watson.”

You can find the 19301933, and 1976 issues of The Moron by clicking the years, or find all the the issues of The Maroon (and The Moron) here!

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives wishes you a Happy April Fools’ Day!

Posted by Student Worker Samantha.

On This Day: WWL debuts in 1922

Loyola radio telegraph class at the original WWL station, circa 1920

Today, March 31, marks the 95th anniversary of WWL-Radio’s first broadcast from Loyola’s Marquette Hall. Loyola’s first wireless receiver was setup on campus in 1909 by Fr. Anton (Anthony) Kunkel using a $150 transmitter. Shortly after the University was chartered in 1912, the Wireless Radio School was established for the purposes of training students telegraphy. The school closed at the end of the 1921-1922 academic year just in time for the Physics department faculty and students to apply for a broadcast license . On March 31, 1922, Loyola broadcast its first voice transmissions (a request for fundraising support from Loyola President Fr. Edward Cummings), making Loyola the originator of New Orleans’ first ever radio program broadcast. While the call letters WWL were assigned arbitrarily, Physics Instructor and future head of the station Fr. Orie Leo Abell would use them to refer to “World Wide Loyola.”

WWL-transmitter

WWL transmitter, circa 1932. Image from WWL: AM--FM--TV; the second campus of Loyola University

WWL later made history by influencing the Internal Revenue Code with its request for tax-exempt status.

WWL station in Kenner, LA

In 1938, a new transmitter was built in Kenner, a suburb of New Orleans, near Lake Pontchartrain. While the station partially flooded in the Hurricane of 1947, it remained in use until it was again moved, this time to Estelle, Louisiana, in the mid 1970s.

WWL Station in Kenner, LA

WWL’s history is closely intertwined with that of both New Orleans and Loyola. Loyola eventually sold all of its media holdings in 1989. WWL-AM and WLMG (formerly WWL-FM) were sold for $12.85 million, while WWL-TV was purchased by Rampart Broadcasting , headed by alums J. Michael Early and Phil Johnson, for $102.85 million.

"DON LEWIS (right), crack announcer, interviews COL. BENNETT MOLTER at the army recreation center on Lake Pontchartrain. WWL carries a weekly broadcast from Camp Polk at Leesville, La., featuring soldier-talent of the third armored brigade, as well as other shows by and for the men in service."

Much more info about the history WWL at Loyola is available in a number of publications, including C. Joseph Pusateri’s Enterprise in radio : WWL and the business of broadcasting in America,  WWL: AM–FM–TV; the second campus of Loyola University (also available in the University Archives Vertical File), and Bernard Cook’s Founded on faith : a history of Loyola University New Orleans.

2002-3-21_WWL-anniversary

Advertisement for March 21, 2002 WWL-AM celebration

The Loyola Lady

As Women’s History Month draws to a close, we reflect on the history of women at Loyola University with the 1962 issue of The Loyola Lady, a handbook for women students distributed by the university.

Loyola Lady Cover

You are 35% strong, co-eds. You compose 35% of the enrollment of Loyola University according to the 1961-62 enrollment figures. Today that figure has increased because more and more young ladies are coming to Loyola each year. When Loyola became a university, the Class of 1911 boasted a 32 student membership with one coed, Miss Lurline Wilson of Independence. The '61-'62 enrollment figures showed approximately 3,200 students from 33 states with 25 countries plus U.S. possessions. Today's registration will hoist that figure. A need for a handbook entirely on the feminine side was pointed out by the Dean of Women. This project was begun last year with a booklet entitled "The Wolfette," edited by Mary Ann Vial, Cathy Lund and Kathy Eberle. This year the booklet, "The Loyola Lady," is published with the sincere hope that it will help you to get to know Loyola and to become a part of this great institution of learning by contributing your very best to the excellent spirit of friendliness, cooperation and leadership that exists in the classrooms and on the campus of Loyola University.

Welcome, Loyola Lady. Welcome to the Loyola campus and sincere best wishes that the coming year will be marked with success in your academic, social, and personal life on the university level. To help you to know what is expected of and what is offered to the Loyola lady, we have prepared this handbook for you. Take a few moments of your time to read it carefully in order that you may become better acquainted with your Alma Mater. Rosalie Parrino, Dean of Women. "Takehold on instruction, leave it not, keep it, because it is thy life." Proverbs, Chapter 4, 13. Published by Loyola University, 1600 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana. Editor: Charmaine Currault.

While Loyola Lady is unsurprisingly outdated, it also highlights many of the activities and service activities women students engaged in in the 60s and encourages female students to participate in intramural sports.

For those of you who are would-be marksmen, there's an excellent rifle team which has competed in a number of state-wide tournaments. In the spring, the department is planning to have a swimming team. Needless to say, you do not have to be a great star to participate in these activities. Remember it's the spirit that counts. The Powder Puff Bowl, an annual even, will include a male "Sweetheart Court." Believe me, in this girls' football game, they come up with a few tricks the boys have never seen.

College Togs. Dress properly for every occasion. Clothing should play an important part in the college coeds plans for college. That is why it is necessary for you to realize how important it is to be properly dressed for every occasion. A first impression be a "good impress" if you dress properly. Things to bring to Loyola. 1. Sweaters and skirts (Bulk style popular).  2. Summer cottons (New Orleans weather is warm until November). 3. Loafers, flats and iby league saddles are worn to class 4. Raincoat or trench coat ( We do have our rainy season) 5. Heavy coat for dress purposes, short coat for sports wear or casual dress. 6. Cocktail dresses are used for evening receptions, semi-formals , operas or fraternity rush party dates. 7. Long formals are rarely worn. Semiformals are the vogue. 8. Drip-dry blouses. 9. Accessories: jewelry (small pearl earrings and necklaces are popular--too many rhinestones are not in good taste. Scarfs, gloves, purse (a small book size purse.) 10. Small handkerchief size veils or chapel caps are popular for week day Mass. A basic black, navy, or brown dress is always in good taste . 12. Opera pumps are always fashionable. 13. Bermuda shorts, slim jims, and a bathing suit.

Little Reminders That Help. The Loyola Lady is courteous at all times. Here are a few rules on introductions and such: 1. Young peopl are presented to older people, a man is presented to a woman, and a less important person is pre-sented to a more important one.  2. A student should introduce herself to faculty members or to guests of the University at any social function . 3. All invitations must be answered promptly. In replying always use plain stationery and black or blue-black ink. In a formal reply, use the third person, making no abbreviations, and writing out all numbers. This should be in the same form as the invitation. Remember that no reply is necessary when the name of a person to whom to send the reply is not given. 4. It is the hostess' privilege and duty to greet the chaperones, introduce them to one another, the students, and served to the chaperones before others are served.

Our University Archives contain images of female Wolfpack students engaging in a number of the activities detailed in The Loyola Lady including rifle practice, the Powder Puff game, attending mass, and hosting social functions.

Target practice

Target shooting team

Churchgoers receiving communion at the Mass of the Holy Ghost

Student in freshman beanie at Baccalaureate Mass

Students at a Dance, 1953

Women students eating

Women students in dorm

Women students cooking

Women students serving food

1965 Wolf Yearbook "Pumpkin Bowl"

1969 Wolf Yearbook Powder Puff

The Loyola Lady is available in the University Archives Vertical File in Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday, 9-4:30pm.

Media Services Helps Bring VP of Bolivia to Classroom

On Tuesday, March 14th, Bolivian Vice President Álvaro García Linera spoke with Professor Josefa Salmon’s Latin American Cinema Class via Skype in Bobet 332. Skype videoconferencing is familiar to many who use it to converse with family and friends.  Media Services’s wide angle webcamera enabled all the students to be seen in this large classroom. If you’d like to bring a noted speaker to your class or meeting via videoconference, please contact us for more information!

Read The Maroon’s article on this event.

Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats

"This book is respectfully dedicated to those friends who have assisted its composition by their encouragement, criticism and suggestions: and in particular to Mr. T.E. Faber, Miss Alison Tandy, Miss Susan Wolcott, Miss Susanna Morley, and the Man in White Spats.

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats dedication

Today is Respect Your Cat Day (yes, apparently that is a thing). In celebration, enjoy this 1939 first edition of T. S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats from the Robert Giroux Book Collection of 20th century American writers.

Eliot_cover

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats cover

Of course, many people best know this work for Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical adaptation, Cats.

The Trailer for CATS – Released in 1998! | Cats the Musical

This book and many more Eliot resources are available for research in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

Eliot_back-cover

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats back cover

Open Education Week 2017

Open Education Week celebrates the movement to create, share and use freely-available educational resources and tools among students, teachers and administrators.  Open educational materials (OEMs) can be freely obtained, edited or altered, and redistributed.  The week runs March 27 through 31, 2017.  Here at Loyola we support creation, distribution and use of OEMs, such as open textbooks, classroom presentations, videos, notes, question and quiz pools and more.  If you’ve read this far, then your awareness has been raised–goal achieved!  To learn more, contact us.

Hashtag: #openeducationwk

Flashback Friday!

Celebrate Flashback Friday with a little retro photo fun from our University Photographs Collection!

Title UP009593

Creator
Cresson, Russell G.

Contributors
Loyola University (New Orleans, La.)

Subject
Women
Loyola University (New Orleans, La.)
Blue Key Talent Night
Students

Description
Women perform on stilts

dancing stilts

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

Screen Shot 2017-03-21 at 3.26.57 PM

The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

Maroon

The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

Screen Shot 2017-03-21 at 3.23.11 PM

These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

American Chocolate Week: Walter Baker and Co.

Seeing as it is American Chocolate Week, we here at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives are offering a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones: