SGA Elections of the 50s

SGA Elections were last week. While you anxiously await the results, enjoy these images of Loyola students voting in the 1950s.

These photos and more can be found in the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Loyola University New Orleans Library History Collection

Dating back to 1983 all the way through 2009, the Loyola University New Orleans library put out a periodical newsletter that documents the history of the libraries and librarians throughout the time. In the Summer 1995 issue, one of the cover page articles is focused on the library’s search for a newer, more efficient computer system that came along with the plans for building the library. The January 1999 issue first reveals the floor plans of the new library building, as well as a helpful fact sheet detailing the plans for the update.

The Fall 2000 issue explains the layout of the floors of the library in regards to the noise policy, as well as some of the new and upcoming (at the time) features the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library has to offer.

Check out this link for more issues of the Loyola University New Orleans Library Newsletter.

Posted by Student Worker Samantha

Flashback: 1968

Forty-eight years ago this week, Loyola’s campus was a-buzz with activity.

As we are today, the nation, and the campus, were focused on presidential politics. President Lyndon Johnson had just announced he would not seek another term in office. The Maroon reported that, in a visit arranged by Tulane and Loyola students, Robert F. Kennedy would be speaking at Tulane’s campus. (Kennedy would be assassinated at a campaign event in California one month later.)

Multiple Maroon articles reported on the campus fall-out of the enrollment of an undercover New Orleans police department narcotics officer.

Edgar “Dooky” Chase was the first African-American student to be elected to Loyola’s Student Council.

In entertainment news, The Beach Boys and Buffalo Springfield were about to play on campus.

Check out more of what was happening on campus any year in Special Collections & Archives or The Maroon archives online.

Bonus video: Buffalo Springfield, live!

Collection Spotlight: Dawson Gaillard Papers

Dawson Ann Forman Gaillard Keefe was born on September 25, 1938, in Marietta, Georgia, and grew up in Monroe (Ouachita Parish), Louisiana, graduating from Neville High School. She earned a B. A. in Social Studies and English at Louisiana State University (1959) and both a Master’s (1965) and Doctorate in English (1970) from Tulane University. Gaillard was a member of the faculty of Loyola University New Orleans from 1968 to 1983, and served as chair of that department from 1974 to 1977. She also edited the New Orleans Review from 1973 to 1979.

She worked as copy manager for the LSU Press from 1979 to 1981 and wrote the copy for the advertisements and book jackets of Confederacy of Dunces and other titles.  Gaillard authored a book entitled Dorothy L. Sayers (1980) on the English mystery writer and (with colleague John Mosier)  co-edited a groundbreaking anthology of short fiction, Women and Men Together (1978).

Her battle with multiple sclerosis contributed to her eventual departure from academic and professional life, and on October 1, 1985 she died in an accident at her home in Metairie, Louisiana.  The annual Dawson Gaillard Writing Awards are held in her honor at Loyola University, recognizing student work in the categories of expository writing, creative non-fiction, poetry, fiction, and script.

The Dawson Gaillard Papers consist primarily of the personal and professional writings of Dr. Dawson Gaillard. These include…

Her personal diaries from 1951 to 1985:

Gaillard-diaries

Gaillard-diary-inside

Academic work and research papers written as a student and teacher:

Gaillard-MQ

Samples of her copyediting work from LSU Press, and a small amount of original nonfiction, fiction and poetry: Gaillard-Superbug

Gaillard-photos

Also included is research related to the 1927 murder trial of Ada LeBouef and Dr. Tom Dreher, including two audiocassette tapes of interviews conducted by Gaillard with Murphy Dreher, Tom Dreher’s nephew, and Mrs. Waleer Hamlin, the wife of Ada LeBouef’s lawyer.

Gaillard-notes

Gaillard-tapes

The Dawson Gaillard Papers are available for viewing in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Rare Irish Books

We just can’t get enough of Irish literature and history books in Special Collections & Archives (previously here, here, here, and here). To celebrate another St. Patrick’s Day, here are some more images of rare books about St. Patrick and Ireland in our collection.

From St. Patrick, apostle of Ireland:
St-Patrick-cover

St-Patrick-TP

From St. Patrick’s Day Sermon:

St-Patrick-Sermon-TP

From History of Ireland:

History-Ireland-end-paper

History-Ireland-illustration

History-Ireland-illustration-2

These and many more can be viewed in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

Pi Day

It’s Pi Day! Here are Loyola students from days of yore enjoying some pi(e) related activities.

These images and more can be viewed in the Loyola University New Orleans University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

The New Orleans Mint, March 8th, 1838

Today in celebration of the 178th anniversary of the opening of the New Orleans Mint, we bring you some images and info from the book Illustrated History of the United States Mint.

MINT008

Published in 1892, the book gives a complete overview of the American coinage history and production at the time.

MINT002
MINT007 MINT001

 

Here are the pages specific to the the New Orleans Mint:

MINT004

MINT003 MINT005

If you would like to take a closer look at this volume or other books on the history of New Orleans, come visit the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

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Here’s a Library Lagniappe for you. A film from 1940 showing how coins are minted!

Open Education Week 2016

March 7 through 11, 2016 is Open Education Week around the world. It seeks to spread recognition and use of free and open educational materials and promote an understanding of how these materials can benefit students and teachers. Ask us or your teacher about using open textbooks at Loyola. As the Open Education Week website says: “The open education movement seeks to reduce barriers, increase access and drive improvements in education through open sharing and digital formats.
Open education includes free and open access to platforms, tools and resources in education, including learning materials, course materials, videos, assessment tools, research, study groups, and textbooks, all available for free use and modification under an open license.”

Visit the Monroe Library’s Open Access guide at http://researchguides.loyno.edu/openaccess and the Open Textbook guide at http://researchguides.loyno.edu/opentextbooks.

Feminist Festival Faculty Display

In conjunction with the Women’s Resource Center, the Feminist Festival, and Women’s History Month, the Monroe Library is presenting a display of faculty works outside of the Living Room on the 1st floor of the library. Works included may focus on women and gender issues or may show the progress women have made in various academic, business, and artistic areas. The display includes books, journals, and select articles and will be available through March 31.

A full list of the materials included in the display is available here.

Now Online: Informed Sources

Since 1984, WYES, New Orleans’ public television station, has been broadcasting Informed Sources, a program devoted to in-depth discussion of the news by local journalists.

The WYES Informed Sources Archive is now now available for viewing online, and offers a look at thirty years of local history through conversations about crime, politics, education and life in New Orleans. Take a look!