The Book As Art: Three Works by Maddy Rosenberg

Since the early production of books, artists have collaborated with printers to produce richly illustrated volumes.  With the arts and crafts movement and subsequent avant-garde groups in the late 19th century, the book as art moved away from traditional formats to incorporate more daring designs and conceptual possibilities. Loyola’s Special Collections and Archives holds many wonderful examples of these creative combinations of text and image in the Rosalee McReynolds Collection. Several more recent acquisitions showcase the work of Maddy Rosenberg, an artist and curator based in New York and Berlin. In The Ruins, Lost and Berlin Bestiary, Rosenberg explores themes of destruction and history as well as architectural forms.

In The Ruins, through the accordion folding and scalloped pages, Rosenberg transforms a traditional two-dimensional book design into a Roman or Grecian wall. Masks reminiscent of early theater line the inside while small statues pop out of exterior corners.

The Ruins (Front Open) – 2009, 3.75 x 6, soft-covered digital version, Edition 6 of 10

The Ruins (Back Open) – 2009, 3.75 x 6, soft-covered digital version, Edition 6 of 10

The Ruins (Closed) – 2009, 3.75 x 6, soft-covered digital version, Edition 6 of 10

Lost combines images from illuminated manuscripts with contemporary images of bombed areas of Baghdad. Rosenberg created this work for the Al-Mutanabbi Street project, organized in response to the car bombing of a street of booksellers in Baghdad. The project asked book artists for works that “reflect both the strength and fragility of books, but also show the endurance of the ideas within them.” By combining old and new forms of illustration, Rosenberg creates a dialogue between tradition and ongoing devastation of communities in Iraq. Since the 7th century when the first Islamic books appeared, ornamental motifs, luxury bindings and illustrations often accompanied text. Lost pays homage to this history and the significance of book making in Iraqi culture.

Lost, Front Cover - 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 1 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 2 and 3 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 4 and 5 - 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 6 and 7 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 8 and 9 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 10 and 11 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 12 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

For Berlin Bestiary, a pop-up book, Rosenberg enclosed images of stone animals found in the streets and parks of Berlin with monumental tombs from the Jewish cemetery in Weisensee, near the city. The second largest Jewish cemetery in Europe, Weisensee remained intact through much of the bombing during World War II but fell into disrepair due to the murder and emigration of much of the Jewish community. Now the site of the Holocaust Concentration Camp Memorial, the cemetery was added to UNESCO’s list of world heritage monuments in 2005.

Berlin Bestiary (Front Open) – 2010, edition 14 of 20, 7 x 5 inches

Berlin Bestiary (Back Open) – 2010, edition 14 of 20, 7 x 5 inches

For more information or to see these wonderful creations yourself, stop by Special Collections and Archives, located on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library. We are open Monday through Thursday 9:00-4:30 and Friday 9:00-12:00. To find out about Maddy Rosenberg and view more of her work, visit www.maddyrosenberg.net.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

We’re Hiring! PT Learning Commons & Stacks Assistant

The Monroe Library seeks a Part-time Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant who will provide basic circulation, reference, and technology assistance in an active learner-centered environment. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is responsible for conducting collection inventory and stacks maintenance. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is also responsible for opening the library Monday through Friday.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree or two years of college and two years of library experience; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with library users and colleagues; excellent customer services skills; skills and experience in the use of computer applications for word processing, scanning, printing, spreadsheets; comfort with the use of technology for data analysis; collaborative problem-solving skills and initiative with a high degree of accuracy in complex, detailed work.

Physical Requirements: Access upper library shelves with a step stool and bend to lower shelves; lift and carry equipment, supplies, or materials weighing up to 30 lbs; push a fully loaded, wheeled, book cart, up to 100 lbs.; sustain long periods of standing/walking back and forth; bend, stoop, and reach equipment and materials.

For info on how to apply, see: http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities

The Colors of Carnival

“Mask”- From A Mardi Gras Dictionary by Beverly B. Vidrime

Mardi Gras is finally here! New Orleans is full of tourists and locals alike, all coming together to join in on New Orleans’s biggest and brightest annual celebration. Many of us have witnessed the spectacle that is a Carnival parade, and below are pictured some examples of the wild colors that you can experience walking down the streets during this exciting time.

“Zulu” from A Mardi Gras Dictionary by Beverly B. Vidrime

There are the colors of gowns at Krewe balls, glittery masks, headdresses of Mardi Gras Indians, and the many beads and throws that we’ll be collecting over the next few days! Some of the materials in Special Collections display the variety of color that can be found in Carnivals past and present.

“Tiepolo, Le Menuet or Scene de la carnival (detail)” from Mardi Gras: New Orleans by Henri Schindler

“Allison (“Tootie”) Montana, Big Chief, Yellow Pocahontas, 1990″ from Mardi Gras Indians by Michael P. Smith

“Tootie (at right), Darryl Montana (in middle), Marlon Sennette (at left), Chantz Stevenson (Montana’s grandson), 1993″ from Mardi Gras Indians by Michael P. Smith

To view the books mentioned in this post, and other books about the history of Mardi Gras in New Orleans, visit Special Collections and Archives on the 3rd Floor of the Monroe Library.

Blog post by Maureen Kelly, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

How To Tuesday: King’s Cake Recipe

Welcome to How To Tuesdays here at the Library Lagniappe Blog. Today, since it’s carnival season and the king’s cake is practically KING… we present to you a king cake recipe from The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book published in 1910.

First you need to get your ingredients and learn about the origins/history of the cake:

Don’t forget to get a baby!

And now the “how to”:

Voila! King cake!

Feel free to come and visit the Special Collections & Archives Monday through Thursday 9:00 – 4:30 or Friday 9:00 – 12:00 to check out this recipe and others.

Here’s this lagniappe to inspire some baking: a Kodachrome home movie of the Rex parade filmed on Mardi Gras day in 1941 from the Internet Archive.

Spotlight on Social Justice: Exhibit

Special Collections & Archives is currently displaying selections from some of our newer social justice collections. Through protest documentation and photographs, grassroots activist literature and zine culture, the collections exhibited here exemplify Loyola’s mission of working for a more just world.

The collections on display include The Rosemary Drown Archdiocese of New Orleans and School Integration Collection, The New Orleans Social Justice and Activism Collection, and The K. (Kenneth) Brad Ott Papers.

The exhibit will be on display from February 2- May 29. Special Collections & Archives is open Monday – Thursday from 9am-4pm and Friday 9am-12pm.

Enter the Monroe Library Student Research Competition

Students are invited to apply to the 2015 Monroe Library Student Research Competition. The competition recognizes and rewards students who make exemplary use of the collections, resources, and services of the Monroe Library throughout the research process in order to produce an academic or creative work.

  • $200 for a freshman/sophomore research project
  • $200 for a junior/senior research project
  • $200 for a senior thesis project
  • $200 for a graduate student research project

Applications are due Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Application information is available at: http://library.loyno.edu/services/instruction/competition/

For more information, contact Malia Willey: mewilley@loyno.edu

The New Orleans Water Cure

Sometimes when browsing the books in our Special Collections & Archives a title just beckons you to pluck it from the shelf.

Today it was a volume entitled New Orleans Water Cure, by Father François Rougé. Written around 1887, this book outlines and explains how to use Bavarian priest Sebastian Kneipp’s, “Water Cure” to treat illnesses.

Sebastian Kneipp

Kneipp’s Water Cure was by no means exclusive to New Orleans, nor was it created here. The “Kneipp Cure” was essentially Kneipp’s take on hydrotherapy combined with naturopathic medicine.

The volume pits Kneipp’s hydrotherapy against the use of medicines to treat illness and outlines the processes involved in seeking and administering the cure.

Here is an excerpt illustrating the anti-medicine stance of the Kneipp Water Cure:

One of the more whimsical seeming requirements (part of Kneipp’s “hardening process”) was walking in the dew barefoot.  This actually became a (somewhat ridiculed) fad in Central Park in New York City, where gentlemen and ladies were seen walking barefoot in the morning dew or winter snow.

Kneipp’s methods (called Kneippism) combine hydrotherapy with diet, exercise, and herbal medicine. He was the most famous nature doctor of his time whose clients included Archduke Franz Ferdinand and Pope Leo XIII.

Franz Ferdinand

Pope Leo XIII

The Kneipp Water Cure located in New Orleans opened to the public on July 11th, 1896  in the area of Flood St. and Levee St. (Peters St. and Flood St.), and was initially run by Father Rougé, the author of book.

Daily Picayune advertisement from July, 31, 1898

Above is an image of the New Orleans Kneipp Water Cure (Cure D’Eau) from around 1905-1910. (Note the large water tower.)

Kneippism still flourishes today with a popular line of Kneipp naturopathic products available as well as locations where you can undergo Kneipp derived therapies.

Please feel free to come to visit the Special Collections & Archives to check out this book in our reading room Monday through Thursday 9:00am to 4:30pm.

#howtoTuesday: Yachting

Today’s #howtoTuesday comes from the Southern Yacht Club–the second oldest yacht club in the United States. Founded in 1849 and re-organized in 1878 after the Civil War and the subsequent Reconstruction, the S.Y.C. published this volume in 1892 to cover the organization’s charter, by-laws, racing rules, and more.

The S.Y.C. clubhouses (the organization is now on its fourth structure) have been located in the West End area of New Orleans on Lake Pontchartrain since 1857. Images of the S.Y.C. from other Louisiana repositories are available in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Panorama from West End from Southern Yacht Club, Louisiana State Museum

Sailboats being prepared for a regatta on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans Louisiana, State Library of Louisiana

Southern Yacht Club on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans Louisiana in the early 1900s, State Library of Louisiana

Far View of Southern Yacht Club 1919-03-16, The Historic New Orleans Collection

For more information on the S.Y.C., visit Special Collections & Archives to view the entire S.Y.C. handbook as well as The sesquicentennial of the Southern Yacht Club of New Orleans, 1849-1999 : 150 years of yachting in the Gulf South.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Backwards Dance: Loyola, 1962

While looking through our University Photographs Collection the other day I came across a series of pictures that are tagged with the phrase “Backwards Dance.”

The images depict co-eds in 1962 dressed in silly costumes and having what looks like a great time.

What is a backwards dance, you might ask? It’s basically a Sadie Hawkins dance: where girls ask boys to the dance, instead of the other way around.

The origin of the name Sadie Hawkins comes from a Li’l Abner comic strip character that decides to challenge all the unmarried men in her small town to a foot race so as to catch a husband.

Being the curious person that I am, I had to look a little further and see if there was an earlier example of this practice. It so happens that in 5th century Ireland, St. Patrick reportedly gratified St. Bridgett’s complaint that men were often too shy to ask women to marry them by sanctioning the right for women to propose to men on Leap Day.

This practice appears fairly antiquated by today’s social mores and it could be argued as either anti-feminist or feminist depending on how you frame it within the long arm of history… but it still looks like they are having a pretty good time in 1962.

And in closing, here is a little musical lagniappe of The Exciters singing “Tell Him” to a bear in a zoo!

Special Collections & Archives are open Monday through Thursday 9:00-4:30 and Friday 9:00-12:00 and are located on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library.

Now Hiring: Learning Technologies Developers

Learning Technologies Developer – University Library (2 openings)

The Learning Technologies Developer will plan, create, implement, and support media and web content to enhance student and faculty learning. This position is responsible for the successful implementation and enhancement of digital content affiliated with the library’s Blackboard, teaching, and learning initiatives, as well as backend maintenance and support for content delivery and management systems.

The Learning Technologies Developer works to enhance how faculty and students utilize technology and online learning tools to increase active learning, refine critical thinking and communications skills, and develop information and media fluencies. Oversee media and application production services that support teaching and learning at Loyola.

Qualifications: Completion of an undergraduate degree required; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with faculty, staff, students and others; ability to work productively in a team environment; excellent organizational and project management skills; must have in depth knowledge of computer operating systems, web browsers; demonstrated proficiency with MS Office, video and audio editing, webpage creation, and other applications such as Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Final Cut, etc.; experience with object-oriented programming and/or scripting languages; experience producing digital or web-based instructional materials and streaming media; experience working in an academic environment preferred; experience developing and conducting training sessions preferred; experience with Adobe Flash, web programming languages such as CSS & XML, and Blackboard or other LMS (Learning Management System(s).

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.