#ColorOurCollections Week with Identifying Microscopic Fungi

In celebration of #ColorOurCollections Week, we have been looking for some scans from the past that we thought might be fun to decolorize.

One such post from 2014 explores both a book and its author,  Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi.

We were initially impressed by the illustrations… but after being made curious and conducting a little research… we found a man with a truly fascinating life!

Mordecai was a busy guy!

M.C. Cooke did not have much in the way of a formal education but wrote hundreds of articles and books on botany and mycology. Collected roughly 46,000 specimens, contributed over 20 years of service to museum collections while editing journals and founding societies.

Here are the original color plates and the decolorized ones for #ColorOurCollections week:

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Mardi Gras Coloring Pages

We promised more Mardi Gras-related #ColorOurCollections, and here they are! The following coloring pages are from our New Orleans Carnival Collection (previously blogged about here and here).

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Comus 1878 Invitation

 

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Comus 1910 Invitation, folded

 

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Comus 1910 Invitation, unfolded

 

 

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1968 Mardi Gras Calendar cover

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1891 Momus Invitation

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Momus 1878 Invitation

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Proteus 1899 Invitation, Side A

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Proteus 1899 Invitation, Side B

Our students have been coloring away! Here’s some of their handiwork:

Read more about #ColourOurCollections and find our previous coloring books here.

Recent Undergrad Theses from the Digital Archives

Whether it’s for the Honors program or a senior capstone project, many Loyola students undertake the feat of writing a thesis towards the end of their undergraduate careers. They serve as an interesting look into the research and interests of Loyola’s diverse student body. These theses eventually make their way into Loyola’s Special Collections and Archives, where they’re added to the Electronic Theses Digital Archive.

Devon Vance, a 2012 graduate in music performance, wrote a thesis entitled Occupational injuries of the classical horn player for her honors thesis. She writes in her abstract:

  • “Injuries in musicians, though common, are also commonly kept quiet in the musical community. Fear of losing a gig or being seen as unreliable or weak can end careers… This guide presents information on the causes of many musicianship injuries, how they affect the player’s ability to perform, and how they can be treated and largely prevented. Information is the key to getting help for those musicians suffering from occupational injuries, spreading awareness to the rest of the musical community about these hazards of playing, and to gain acceptance and understanding for these musicians because injuries are common and are not always a result of the player’s negligence. Educating teachers and instructors is one way to spread awareness and to work to prevent these injuries from ever happening. After all, as music educators, we should educate the student on all aspects of playing, including correct posture and comfort to give the student the best chance at success because music is more than just what comes out of the bell of the horn, music is also what goes into the mouthpiece of the horn.”

Rebecca Urquhart, a 2016 graduate in environmental science, was mentored by professor Craig Hood on her honors thesis entitled Seasonal Bat Ecology at Jean Lafitte Park. In her thesis, which discusses the species and activities of bats in Jean Lafitte Park, she writes:

  • “There is currently not enough data confirm lunar philia or phobia of bat activity at the park… Sites that both had more activity occur on full moons did not always share this high activity on the same month. In April, for example, there was more activity occurring during the full moon at the Education Center and the exact opposite at the Coquille Bridge site. This phenomenon reversed in May, with more activity occurring during a new moon at the Education Center and more activity occurring during a Full moon at the Coquille Bridge site. The inconsistencies in activity could be due to obstruction of the moon by cloud coverage and other weather events. The activity is also not associated with one particular species, there are general trends of high or low activity across all species at these sites during the lunar phase observations. Several years of complete monthly activity will be needed to confirm or deny the hypothesis of bat activity at the park being affected by the lunar cycle.”

For her 2016 honors thesis, psychology student Madeline Janney wrote a book for young readers entitled Tonight We’re Having Red Beans and Rice. Pages from the book are pictured below:

Sociology and Women’s Studies graduate Lauren Poiroux wrote an honors thesis entitled What’s Your Type?: Romantic Partner Selection In Loyola University Men. She describes her research process as follows:

  • “In order to find my sample, I used a method of gathering participants called convenience ‘Snowball’ sampling. Essentially, I asked someone to participate in my study, and after the interview, I ask the participant to give me names of others to contact to be interviewed. The hope with procuring my sample in this way is that it places some responsibility on the participant to find willing participants, which helps to ensure randomness, which ensures a more unbiased study. Through this method, I was able to interview 10 Loyola men, all who interviewed for at least thirty minutes, though the majority had interviews over an hour. All of the men were current Loyola students, with an age range between 20 and 22. All of the men I interviewed were white, which could perhaps be a result of the sampling method. This certainly places a skew on the data, making it not as generalizable to the entire population. Future studies should look at men of other racial backgrounds…”

The Electronic Theses Collection can be found here in its entirety, and other digitized collections from Special Collections and Archives can be found here.

Posted by student worker Maureen.

#ColorOurCollections

This week is #ColorOurCollections, a week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives has three coloring books available for you to download and print:

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Throughout the week, we’ll also be posting new coloring pages related to our Mardi Gras collections!

Above: Loyola University New Orleans graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks, from the University Photographs Collection. Click here to download.

Once you’ve colored your picture(s), share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

Click here for a list of other institutions participating in #ColorOurCollections to find even more coloring options.

Photos of the Danna Center

I digitized about 100 photos from the Department of Student Involvement as my first project as a Special Collections intern. Here is a small sample of some of them.

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This Photo depicts a bar and restaurant that existed when my mom went to Loyola located at the current spot of Satchmo’s.

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This Photograph depicts what the cafeteria in the Danna Center used to look like over 30 years ago.

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This photograph depicts a former dessert shop in the Danna Center.

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This photograph depicts what used to be in the spot of the One Loyola Room right in front of the bookstore.

Blog by Student Intern Benjamin.

Alternative Groundhog Day?

It’s Groundhog Day again, and reports are that Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, predicting six more weeks of winter weather. That is all well and good for our friends up north, but did you know that New Orleans once had it’s own oracle rodent named…Sybil? The February 6, 1981 issue of The Maroon broke it down:

And what would Groundhog Day be without…Groundhog Day? Enjoy!

Thank you New Orleans Opera Board!

Last night, Special Collections & Archives was pleased to host the New Orleans Opera Board for a viewing of our exhibits, LOYNOOA: Loyola University and Opera in New Orleans, and Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

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Thank you to the Opera Board for coming and seeing a small portion of this wonderful collection.

Women’s March Archive at SCA

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HAPPY NATIONAL PIE DAY!

Celebrate National Pie Day via the Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council Cookbook.

A Book of favorite recipes, compiled by Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council, 1979.

A Book of favorite recipes, compiled by Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council.

Take a look at our TUMBLR for larger images of the recipe text, or view the book while visiting the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

#Feathursday

It’s #feathursday again! These ostriches can be found in the circa 1900 Basil Thompson Childhood Scrapbook in the Louisiana Digital Library.