Thanksgiving Break Reduced Hours

The J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library hours for the Thanksgiving
break are as follows:

Monday, November 21 7:30am-2:00am

Tuesday, November 22 7:30am-10:00pm

Wednesday, November 23 CLOSED

Thursday, November 24 CLOSED

Friday, November 25 CLOSED

Saturday, November 26 11:00am-6:00pm

Sunday, November 27 11:00am-2:00am

Monday, November 28 Normal Hours Resume
(also available at http://library.loyno.edu/about/hours.php )

All of us here at Monroe Library hope you have the happiest of
Thanksgivings!

Please contact Emily Bufford if you have any questions.

Learning Commons Coordinator
EDBuffor@loyno.edu
504-864-7118

LOYNOOA: Loyola University and Opera in New Orleans

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Special Collections & Archives presents our poster exhibit, LOYNOOA: Loyola University and Opera in New Orleans, located on the first floor of Monroe Library facing the library’s music collection. Using photos and information from the Loyola University Archives, student worker and vocal performance major Gloria Cosenza researched the relationship between the New Orleans Opera Association and Loyola’s opera education programs in conjunction with our 3rd floor exhibit featuring highlights from the New Orleans Opera Association archive. She assembled a timeline of instructors, alumni and notable events, which was translated into posters by SCA project assistant Sara White. Gloria is photographed here hanging some of the posters before vinyl decals were added to illustrate the three eras depicted in the timeline. If you are unable to see the exhibit in person, you may now view many of the posters individually on SCA’s Tumblr.

Vinyl Record Giveaway

Join us for the free Vinyl Record Giveaway!

Tuesday November 15

9:00am to 4:00pm (or until they’re gone)

Monroe Library, Seminar Room 3

Collection Spotlight: New Orleans Review Collection

New Orleans Review Collection: Archives of the Loyola-based books and literature magazine from its inception in 1968 through 1980, Collection 03.

The New Orleans Review (NOR) began in 1967-1968 when Loyola faculty member Miller Williams studied the feasibility of the university publishing a journal of literature and culture. Such a venture, Williams concluded, would enhance Loyola’s intellectual life. Loyola President Homer Jolley, S.J., approved the project, and in the fall of 1968 the first issue of the NOR appeared. The journal’s first three issues were published by Loyola for the New Orleans Consortium–which consisted of St. Mary’s Dominican College, Xavier University, and Loyola. Thereafter, Loyola put out the NOR on its own. Although intended originally as a quarterly, the journal soon settled into a publication schedule of three times each year.

Founders of the NOR aimed to create a literary and cultural journal that would appeal to a broadly literate readership, rather than only to a specialist or academic audience. It would draw from diverse intellectual disciplines and arts. It . would feature fiction, poetry, essays, interviews, photography, book reviews. It would enlist contributions from the accomplished as well as from the beginning writer or artist. It would provide a forum for Loyola faculty and students. And it would demonstrate the university’s commitment to intellectual and artistic endeavor.

Here is a Contributors Sheet from Subseries V-B for Julio Cortázar and the Dummy Sheet from Subseries V-C for the International Issue his work appeared in :

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The New Orleans Review Collection has been arranged into seven series based on types of material: Correspondence; Copy; History of the New Orleans Review; Toole Manuscript; Miscellaneous; Printed Material; Photographic Material. In addition, Series II (Copy) and Series V (Miscellaneous) have been divided into subseries. Material in this collection dates between 1968 and 1980 –mainly between 1970 and 1978.

The most valuable material is found in the Correspondence and the Copy series and in the Minutes subseries of Series V. Correspondence and minutes document the staff’s functioning. Exchanges between staff and contributors is also found in the correspondence. The Copy series follows the author’s manuscript through the editing process. Researchers may wish to consult issues of the New Orleans Review.  These are located both in the Department of Special Collections and Archives and in the University Library’s Serials Collection.

Another interesting element in this collection is the Toole Manuscript, a copyedited copy of Ignatius Reilly (AKA Confederacy of Dunces) by John Kennedy Toole (2 chapters of the novel were published in the New Orleans Review at Walker Percy’s insistence before the full publication of the novel):

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You can research the New Orleans Review Collection Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30 in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in the Special Collections & Archives of Loyola University New Orleans.

Found in the Archives: Estrays

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Today we take a glance at a thin volume of poetry. Estrays was first published in 1918 and then again edited and in hardcover in 1920. It is populated with poetry composed by the poets: Thomas Kennedy, George Steele SeymourVincent Starrett, and Basil Thompson.

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Below is a selection of a poem that that is both representative of the collections’ title and themes (estray : stray); The Quest, by Thomas Kennedy.

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You can browse either edition Monday – Friday from 9:00-4:30  in Booth-Bricker Reading Room inside the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Drawing Loyola’s Jesuit and Musical Identities

Check out these drawings from the 1940s! The probable artist is Alex A. Bucher, who graduated from Loyola with a degree in Music Education in 1947.

These drawings give a new meaning to the term “sacred music!”

What do you think? How would you design a logo for College of Music & Fine Arts today?

These drawings are in a collection that is currently being processed in  the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives. Also, be sure to check the Montage Events calendar for upcoming CMFA events!

This blog was written by student worker Maureen.

Le Scarabée D’or

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Even though Halloween is over, there’s still time to appreciate things on the creepier side! These are a few pictures from a French copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Gold Bug printed in 1892. This story was one of the most popular ones during his lifetime, and was submitted for a writing contest in the Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper, for which he earned the grand prize of $100 dollars, or about $3,230 today. Not only that, but this popularized the idea of cryptography, because the plot is based around an epic treasure hunt, which contains a rather complex cryptogram, with an explanation on how to crack it. So if you like mysteries with a couple chills down your spine, maybe you should check it out!

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This item and more can be viewed in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Blog by student worker Miranda Renzi.

Happy Halloween!

To celebrate, check out a “Haunting Note” (above) from the October 30, 1981 issue of The Maroon.

Each year, the Loyola University New Orleans Maroon features fun, spook-tacular articles surrounding Halloween on campus and in the Crescent City.

Another holiday remembered by the Loyola Maroon is All Saints’ Day.

This article from the October 28, 1994 Maroon explains why All Saints’ Day is so important and reminds students to remember the Holiday amidst all of the Halloween celebrations.

In 2001, the Maroon published an article on the lighter side of Halloween and All Saints’ Day.

However you plan to spend your Halloween and All Saints’ Day,

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives would like to wish you a Happy Halloween!

Posted by student worker Samantha

Voting Information

We just wanted to remind you that Louisiana Early Voting is from Oct 25th-Nov 1st 8:30-6pm!  Get the information you need from the Geaux Vote app.

Opera Student Pass Winner!

Congratulations to Alobi, pictured here with Special Collections and Archives Coordinator Trish Nugent, for winning our New Orleans Opera Association Student Pass contest. The contest involved a seek and find questionnaire & giveaway to support the “Encore! Encore! Bravi! Exhibit Introducing the New Orleans Opera Association Archives” exhibit in Special Collections & Archives. Alobi now has a student pass to the New Orleans Opera Association’s 2016-2017 season.

Congratulations, and thanks to all who participated!