#howtotuesday: Be Green

It’s a green week at Loyola. Wednesday, April 22 is the university’s Earth Day celebration. And National Arbor Day is celebrated annually on the last Friday of April, so it falls on April 24 this year. The holiday was founded by J. Sterling Morton in 1872 with the express intention of encouraging individuals and groups to plant trees. In 1889, McDonough No. 23 was the first Louisiana school to celebrate Arbor Day. 16 years late, Loyola College followed suit.

According to the March 9, 1905 Times-Picayune, each of the twenty-eight students enrolled in the college were asked to plant a young live oak that afternoon to help provide shade across the fledgling campus. The program included songs and recitations and the Rev. Albert Biever, S.J., first president of the college and later of Loyola University, gave an address. An article in the February 13, 1905 Times-Picayune reported that the trees were brought from St. Charles College in Grand Coteau.

Loyola College opened in 1904 and included both preparatory and college students. In 1911, the New Orleans Jesuits reorganized their educational institutions, and the Loyola University we know today was established in 1912.

Loyola College students, 1906-1907

Loyola’s landscape has continued changing and growing. Most recently, the university announced that the demolished Old Library would be transformed into green space.

Thomas Hall as seen from St. Charles Ave.

Special Collections & Archives preserves a number of collections related to environmental justice in Louisiana, including the John P. Clark Papers, the Gulf Restoration Network Archives, and the Ecology Center of Louisiana Papers.

How do you plan to take Loyola’s history and mission as inspiration to be a little more green this week?

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

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