Archive for 2017

Voting Information

We just wanted to remind you that Louisiana elections are Saturday, November 18. Go to the Louisiana Secretary of State Elections and Voting website for more info about times, locations, and your ballot, or download the Geaux Vote app.

A Spooky Week in Special Collections

Insects

Get into the Halloween spirit with this week’s list of links from the Special Collections & Archives Tumblr:

Marbled Monday Page Fright: Endpapers from All Souls’ Night by John Kelly.

CREEPY CRAWLERS!: A delightful infestation of specimen from Le Règne animal… published between 1836-49 and authored by George Cuvier, often referred to as “the father of paleontology.”

#Bookguts: Enjoy a few frightening GIFs from Encyclopédie moderne, Eustache-Marie Courtin, 1824.

Tumblr Blog Post Roundup and *NEW* Instagram for SCA

This weeks list of links for the Special Collections & Archives Tumblr.

The Ghosts of Rowan Oak, by William Faulkner

Janet Mary Riley: A Voice for Social Justice in Louisiana

William Carlos Williams’ Patterson

Also, check out our new Instagram account.

New Exhibit! Janet Mary Riley: A Voice for Social Justice in Louisiana

Come see our NEW exhibit on Loyola law professor, feminist, and social reformer Janet Mary Riley’s life and career.

The exhibit will be up through Spring of 2018 as part of the citywide NOLA4Women a citywide “series of more than 45 exhibits, performances, lectures, blogs and a new app [that] will shine a spotlight on the prominent role women played in creating the cultural, physical and social infrastructure of New Orleans.”

JMR_POSTER (1)

The exhibit is located in the Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of Monroe Library in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room.

Stay tuned for more updates and events throughout the year!

SCA Digest: Archives+Paper+Black Cats!

On the Special Collections & Archives Tumblr blog this week, read about our Catholic Bookstore Archives and check out a recap of #AskAnArchivistDay. Over on Instagram, see some beautiful marbled paper and watch for black cats crossing your path!

CBS_2

October 4: #AskAnArchivist day!

Students and faculty in front of Main Library, circa 1960

October 4 is #AskAnArchivist Day! Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives staff are eager to respond to any and all questions you have about archives and archival work. Tag us on Twitter at @MonroeLibLoyno and use #AskAnArchivist.

What questions can be asked?
No question is too silly . . .

  • What’s the craziest thing you’ve come across in your collections?
  • If your archives had a soundtrack, what songs would be on it?
  • What do archivists talk about around the water cooler?

. . . and no question is too practical!

  • What should I do to be sure that my emails won’t get lost?
  • I’ve got loads of digital images on my phone. How should I store them so I can access them later on?
  • How do you decide which items to keep and which to weed out from a collection?
  • As a teacher, how can I get my students more interested in using archives for projects?

For more information, see the news release from the Society of American Archivists and look at our Storify from last year’s #AskAnArchivist.

Students in Main Library, circa 1950s/60s

FLASH BACK FRIDAY!

Check it at the Loyno Special Collections Tumblr Blog: http://loynosca.tumblr.com/post/165627319457/flashback-friday-with-this-photo-from-our-loyola

FLASHBACK FRIDAY with this photo from our LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS UNIVERSITY PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTION

Maroon newspaper Fall desk editor and Spring society editor Tootsie Williams, Spring feature editor Joan Steib, Falls news editor, and Spring managing editor Jane Suhor, Fall society editor Tessie Lopez. 1955.

September is National Classical Music Month!

See the whole post on our Tumblr: http://loynosca.tumblr.com/post/165591008757/september-is-national-classical-music-month

I would like to highlight our Stephen Dankner Collection of Musical Works and Papers, a prolific composer of more than 60 works including string quartets, concerti, song cycles, sonatas, film scores, and seven symphonies. His works have been recorded on more than half a dozen CDs and many of his chamber works have been performed in Europe, Asia, and throughout the United States. Dankner also taught for several years at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts/Riverfront and Loyola University New Orleans College of Music.

Blog Post: Jean Stafford & Robert Giroux Correspondence

“These letters from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jean Stafford (July 1, 1915 – March 26, 1979) to Farrar, Straus & Giroux (FSG) publishing house editor and her personal friend Robert Giroux (April 8, 1914 – September 5, 2008), are from our partially processed The Papers of Robert Giroux collection and our special collection of Robert Giroux’s books.”

Check out images of these letters and the full blog post over on our Special Collections & Archives Tumblr page:

http://loynosca.tumblr.com/post/165477874462/these-letters-from-pulitzer-prize-winning-author

Computer Science Education Week’s Hour of Code, Hosted by Loyola’s Monroe Library

Year 2000 public domain image.jpg

Public domain image used courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Animation. Decryption. Data Mapping. A growing number of technologies are constantly being developed and working together in both the virtual world and the actual world. From the images in your favorite Pixar movie to hurricane track prediction, we’ve benefitted from the advancements of software programming in ways our parents and grandparents could only have dreamed of. And for many, the coding that makes it all possible has often seemed shrouded in mystery as part of an arcane realm, accessible only to computer science professionals and tech prodigies. For more and more people, though, coding is coming out from within the closed circles of whiz kids at all-night hackathons. You don’t have to be an ace at HTML5 or JavaScript to take part in this event. In fact, you don’t even need to know what either of those things are to find a place at our table. Computer Science Education Week’s Hour of Code™, sponsored by the Monroe Library, invites you to spend your first hour (or thousandth hour!) of learning about coding with us. It’s sixty minutes of hands-on introduction to some basic coding skills using a variety of concepts and approaches. You’ll be able to choose the activity most interesting to you, and you’ll even get to see what the other groups in the Hour of Code™ come up with, as well. See our LibGuide for a list of activities.

So come code with us on Thursday, September 21 from 12:30-1:30 pm in the library’s second floor computer lab (room 229). All you need to bring is your curiosity!