Archive for July, 2016

Olympic Odes

The Games of the XXXI Olympiad, known in it’s host country of Brazil as Jogos Olímpicos de Verão de 2016, will be kicking off in Rio de Janeiro next week. To celebrate, we are looking at The Olympic and Pythian Odes of Pindar.

The Olympic Odes were written by Pindar circa 476 B.C. and celebrate the victors of the Ancient Olympic Games, “either by speed of horses, strength and dexterity on running, wrestling or boxing, or skill in music.” The edition held by Special Collections & Archives was privately printed in 1903 by Nathan Haskell Dole, Boston.

Before there was Street-View

Being a fan of travelling to new destinations but not being able to do so as often as I would like, I love being able to look at pictures of the places I wish to go.  Seeing places in a photograph allows you to imagine yourself seeing it in person for the first time, but with modern technology you can be right in front of that famous monument with just a click of a button thanks to developments such as Google’s Street-View option in their maps.

Although, in 1893 before the time of the internet, and back when travelling across the world was not as easily accessible, people relied on picture books such as Thomas Knox’s “Scenes from Every Land” to see the famous places they wished to travel. And those people who could not see these sites with their own eyes were exactly who this book was directed towards, as General Lee Wallace addresses in the introduction, “ To the few who have traveled; to the many who would like to go abroad, , but are restrained by timidity; to the lacking in funds; to the sick and convalescent who promise themselves sight of the world when health will permit; more especially, to the multitude of unfortunates, who, on account of incurable ailments of whatever kinds, can never hope to escape the narrow confines in which their lots are cast, I venture to address this introduction.”
Scenes From Every Land

This particular book holds over 500 pictures from around the world, from Syria to New Zealand and famous buildings to museum galleries, this book shows it all. But one thing that is interesting to wonder when flipping through the pages of this book is how many of these famous sites have changed since the late 1800s, and thanks to Google Street-View we are able to see just how different, if at all, things are. Just click the links below each picture to see how they are today.

Westminster Abbey, London

Westminster Abbey, London

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower, Paris

The Vatican, Rome

The Vatican, Rome

photobook blog post.15

The Colosseum, Rome

Leaning Tower of Pisa

The Campanile, or Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

Court of Lions in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain

Court of Lions in the Alhambra , Granada, Spain

St. Basil

St. Basil, the Beatified, Moscow

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Cleopatra's Needle, Alexandria, Egypt

Cleopatra’s Needle, New York

(The obelisk was originally in Alexandria, Egypt when this photo was taken but was later moved to Central Park in New York City in 1881)

photobook blog post.1

Washington Monument, Washington D.C.

Degas and New Orleans

“Louisiana must be respected by all her children of which I am almost one…”

Edgar Degas to Henri Rouart. New Orleans, December 5, 1872.

Today marks the birthday of Edgar Degas (1834-1917).

Degas was born in Paris, but his mother was from New Orleans and his family was closely tied to the city.

For a few months in 1872-73, Degas lived with family, including his brother René (who had married their New Orleans cousin, Estelle Musson) at the large Musson family home on Esplanade Avenue. (The home is now a bed and breakfast.)

Degas’s stay in New Orleans resulted in multiple paintings of his family members. A Cotton Office in New Orleans, below, depicts family members, including two of Degas’ brothers, in the offices of his uncle Michel Musson. (Musson is depicted in the foreground, wearing a top hat.)

A Cotton Office, painted in New Orleans in 1873, was the first impressionist painting to be acquired by any museum and marked a turning point in Edgar Degas’ career.

Learn more about Degas and his connection to New Orleans in Edgar Degas: His Family and Friends in New Orleans, available in Special Collections & Archives.

Faulkner’s “Mosquitoes”

Special Collections and Archives holds many editions of the of the works of William Faulkner. Here is a look at some editions of Mosquitoes, an early novel of Faulkner’s set in New Orleans and aboard a boat in Lake Pontchartrain.

You can view these books in person Monday through Friday 9:00 – 4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rdfloor of Monroe Library.

Vintage Summer

It’s hot out there! Enjoy these photos of Loyolians of the past taking advantage of the warm weather.

"Children's Art Classes - Cynthia Clark - teacher 1973 (summer)"

"Children's Art Classes - Summer 1973."

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants (Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen)

Published in 1828, Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen (Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants), by Johann Gottlieb Mann, contains hand-colored lithographs of medical plants, flowers, and fruits. Here is a small selection. To view more of these lithographs click HERE to access them via Louisiana Digital Library.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/