Archive for December, 2012

Now Hiring: Online Course & Curriculum Developer

Loyola University New Orleans invites applications for the position of Online Course & Curriculum Developer. This position offers the opportunity to work with a dynamic leadership team, including a new Dean of Libraries, engaged in initiatives that enhance student and faculty success and define the future of academic libraries.

Under the direction of the Associate Dean for Public Services and as a member of the University Library’s Online Learning Team, the Online Course & Curriculum Developer (Developer) develops and implements effective and innovative online and hybrid courses and course strategies within the University curriculum. The Developer assists with the daily operation of the University’s Blackboard course management system and affiliated systems and services. She or he collaborates directly with faculty and students, using technology and online learning tools to increase active learning, refine critical thinking and communications skills, and enhance informational and pedagogical fluencies. The Developer collaborates with faculty and staff to create and deploy digital content within and external to Blackboard. She or he will serve on committees, task forces, and teams within the University, and is expected to be active professionally and contribute to developments in the field. This position requires expertise within specific duties and superior communication skills.

A full description and application procedures are available at:

http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities

New Orleans student-athletes & the Monroe Library

Last week Washington Wizards and former UConn star Emeka Okafor and Dean of Libraries Mike Olson spoke at an Elevate event (elevateusa.org). Thanks to the leadership efforts of Sky Hyacinthe, Malia Willey, and many others, the academic collaboration between Elevate and Loyola’s Monroe Library is just concluding its first semester. Elevate’s 7th-12th grade student-athletes meet in the Library with tutors to work on homework and build skills for college preparedness.

Emeka Okafor & Mike Olson

Happy birthday, John Kennedy Toole

Today, December 17, would have been John Kennedy Toole’s 75th birthday. Toole, the author of the posthumously published, 1981 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel A Confederacy of Dunces, was born in New Orleans, graduated from Tulane, and later taught at St. Mary’s Dominican College (now part of Loyola’s Broadway campus). Sadly, Toole committed suicide in 1969 at the age of 31 and never got to see the success and accolades his novel earned. Toole’s mother Thelma worked tirelessly to have her son’s work published after his death and it was at Loyola that she tracked down the famous Southern writer Walker Percy and convinced him to give the manuscript (then called simply Ignatius Reilly) a read. Percy was surprised to like the novel and it is through his efforts, along with Loyola professor emeritus Marcus Smith, that part of the book was first published as an excerpt in the New Orleans Review and then published in full by LSU Press in 1980.

Thelma Toole shopped the manuscript for Dunces around so much that there is debate over which is the “first” or original copy. Special Collections & Archives has two possible candidates, one in the New Orleans Review Collection and one donated by Percy’s longtime friend Lyn Hill Hayward.

Confederacy of Dunces was eventually translated into 35 languages. Special Collections & Archives has copies of many different editions of the book in several different languages, largely in the collection donated by Patrick Samway, S.J.

To view these items and more in their entirety, contact Loyola University Special Collections & Archives at archives@loyno.edu or come see us on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Moving Is Never Easy

As Monroe Hall is renovated, departments and individuals have been displaced; some to different offices, some to different buildings and some to modular office space in the Mercy parking lot. Amidst the scramble it is interesting to note that the construction of Monroe Hall brought about it’s own challenges and growing pains, as coverage from The Maroon illustrates. One thing is for sure: moving is never easy.

Maroon - October 10, 1969

Maroon - October 10, 1969

Maroon - October 10, 1969

Maroon - October 10, 1969

Maroon - September 15, 1967

Maroon - September 15, 1967

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy Holidays from the Monroe Library


Happy Holidays from the Monroe Library!

On behalf of the entire Monroe Library team of faculty, staff, and student employees, my wife Karen and I wish you Happy Holidays and all health and happiness in 2013.

Mike Olson

Dean of Libraries

Loyola University New Orleans

A Vision of the Mermaids

In 1929, the Oxford University Press printed, for the first time in full, Gerard Manley Hopkins’ poem “A Vision of the Mermaids,” written on Christmas day of 1862. The poem had been partially printed in A H. Miles’ Poets and Poetry of the Nineteenth Century: Robert Bridges and Contemporary Poets and in the Notes to the Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins edited by Robert Bridges in 1918.

Hopkins was a British poet and Jesuit priest. This volume is the 157th copy of 250 from a limited edition printing, and is made of a facsimile manuscript complete with an illustration by the author.

To view this item in its entirety, contact Loyola University Special Collections & Archives at archives@loyno.edu or come see us on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Loyola’s Mansions on St. Charles Avenue

Did you know that Loyola once own three huge mansions which sat on the corner of St. Charles and Calhoun Street? As the university expanded, these structures became less functional due to lack of space and the constant upkeep required. When plans for the new Communications/Music complex were underway, university officials realized they had to demolish these mansions to make room for the new building. Many older alumni remember these homes with fondness. Can you imagine sitting through class in the attic or ballroom of an old St. Charles mansion?

Elizabeth Seton Building

Thomas More Hall

Thomas More Hall was purchased in 1942 and originally used to house the School of Law. In 1973, the Law School moved into what was then their brand new Branch Knox Miller Hall (known today simply as Miller), allowing the Education Department to move into the mansion. At this point it was renamed Elizabeth Seton Hall after the first native-born American Saint, a woman dedicated to education and the Catholic Faith.

MacDonald Hall

MacDonald Hall

Purchased in 1932 for the newly formed School of Music, MacDonald Hall served in this capacity for over 50 years.

Cummings Hall

Cummings Hall

Named after former Loyola University President Reverend Edward A. Cummings, S.J., Cummings Hall was offered to the university by the estate of the former residents, the Fenner family. The mansion, which sat on St. Charles Avenue between the School of Law and the College of Music buildings, originally housed the Alumni Office and the Sociology Department but was eventually taken over by the College of Music, which had outgrown its space in MacDonald Hall. In March of 1974, the structure was gutted by fire and took over a year to repair.

For more information on these buildings and their subsequent demolition, check out these historic articles from the Times Picayune:

October 18, 1982

February 12, 1983

October 29, 1983

July 24, 1984

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

1952 Snowball Stand

The weather is so warm in New Orleans right now that the only snow you might be thinking of is the kind you’d buy from a snowball stand. Alumnus Jerry Hoskins (’59) recently attended Dr. Bernard Cook’s presentation on the history of Loyola and was inspired to go through his own photographic archives. He was kind enough to share this photo and story with Special Collections & Archives.

In 1952, Jean Torre, Peter Daschbach, Piet Kessels, and Hoskins were taken by the entrepreneurial spirit. The four De La Salle freshmen took a $100 loan out from Hibernia Bank under the company name “JEAPINS.” The snowball stand was built of “midnight requisitioned materials from the dump and the street.” Located on the Calhoun-street side of the campus in front of the student center and Maroon office, the four entrepreneurs made over $800 that summer from selling 5 and 10 cent snowballs–almost a $7,000 profit in today’s money.

Torre, Daschbach, and Hoskins went on to graduate from Loyola in 1959. Kessels was a 1960 Tulane architecture graduate whose work includes the current decoration of Holy Name of Jesus church.

Clockwise from left: Hoskins receiving the Charles H. Bailey Award for Outstanding Male Student; Torre's senior photo; Daschbach (left) boxing

Thank you to Jerry Hoskins for sharing this photo and story with SC&A. For information on the some of the documented buildings of Loyola, come see the Buildings display on the third floor of the library, part of the Monroe Library Centennial Exhibit.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.