Archive for November, 2012

An Emperor visits Loyola

In June of 1954 Loyola hosted a very prominent guest: His Imperial Majesty the Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah, Haile Selassie I, Elect of God, Emperor of Ethiopia.

His Imperial Majesty served as the 225th Emperor of Ethiopia, a 3,000 year familial reign that ended when he was deposed in a 1974 coup. Twenty years prior to that coup he was in New Orleans as part of a worldwide tour, one of many he undertook in an effort to connect Ethiopia with the West and western development. He was a slight man, but reportedly an imposing presence.  The New York Times reported at his death in 1975:

[T]he Emperor looked emaciated, and was only 5 feet 4 inches tall. But he managed to convey an imposing presence and an air of cold command whether he was seated at his desk in military uniform with a blazing array of decorations across his chest; or whether he was standing, caped, on the rostrum of the League of Nations; or whether, seated bolt upright in his green or maroon Rolls-Royce, he was motoring through the dusty streets of Addis Ababa as his subjects lay prostrate while he passed.

His Imperial Majesty is also known as a central figure of the Rastafari Movement. The crowning of the Emperor, whose name at birth was Ras Tafari Makonnen, in 1930 was interpreted by some in Jamaica as fulfillment of a prophecy made a decade prior by Jamaican Pan-African leader Marcus Garvey, who predicted the rise of an African King who would lead the Diaspora back to Africa.  Haile Selassie I was viewed as that leader, a messiah of the African people, and adherents adopted the Emperor, himself a Coptic Christian, into the center of the Rastafari Movement.

1954 Wolf coverage of Haile Selassie's visit.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Extended Study starts Sunday, 12/2

We’ll be open so that you can study around the clock starting on Sunday, December 2 through Friday, December 14!

Hours will be as follows:

Open continuously from 10am on Sunday, December 2 until midnight on Friday, December 7.

Open 7am-midnight on Saturday, December 8.

Open continuously from 10am on Sunday, December 9 until 6pm on Friday, December 14.

Ten things to know about EXTENDED STUDY

  1. The front doors will be locked at 9pm Sunday-Thursday and at 6pm Friday and Saturday.
  2. During this time, please use the computer lab entrance.
  3. Only members of the Loyola community will be permitted to be in the building when the front doors are locked.
  4. A valid Loyola ID will be required to enter the library.
  5. Study groups should work on the first floor in the Learning Commons or in a group study room.
  6. Group study rooms can be checked out to two or more people. Renewals and reservations are not permitted during this time.
  7. The second and third floors are reserved for quiet study.
  8. Never leave your valuables unattended!
  9. Please help our crew keep the library clean by utilizing trash bins.
  10. Free coffee and tea will be available after midnight!

Good luck with finals!

Welcome Elevate New Orleans

The Monroe Library welcomed Elevate New Orleans http://elevateusa.org/this fall. Elevate is an after-school program for inner-city middle and high school students who excel at basketball. The program provides academic, athletic, and social training to help ensure the students attend college and ultimately give back to their community. This mission aligns with the Jesuit vision of education, which includes educating the whole person and acting as men and women for others.

The library is home to the academic program. Loyola students engage in tutoring through the Community-Based Federal Work Study program. Malia Willey (Instruction Coordinator) works with Sky Hyacinthe (Executive Director of Elevate) to develop and implement the curriculum, which includes information literacy and college preparedness. Elevate has also partnered with other Loyola groups, such as the Lindy Boggs Center, the Office of Service Learning, and the University Honors Program.

Welcome Elevate!

New volume: Johannes Brahms Gesamtausgabe

The Monroe Library is proud to add a new volume of the Johannes Brahms Gesamtausgabe (Complete works of Johannes Brahms), edited by our own Dr. Valerie Goertzen, Associate Professor of Music History. Dr. Goertzen’s volume covers Brahms’ arrangements for piano, four hands, and two pianos of works by other composers.

Being asked to edit a critical edition/complete works volume for a major composer is a coup among scholars in the field. Even beyond the prestige, it is truly a labor of love, with the work taking place over several years. Sixty five volumes are planned and 18 have been published. The Monroe Library is thrilled that our volume has arrived and is available for our students and faculty to use.

Congratulations, Dr. Goertzen!

Staff and Faculty Accomplishments for 2012

Please join me in congratulating our staff and faculty on the following achievements for 2012.

Susan Brower.
“Piloting Webconferencing.” Presentation at the 2012 CCUMC Annual Conference, (http://ccumc.unlv.edu/), Las Vegas, NV October 3-7, 2012.
“Choosing, Growing and Sustaining i>clicker on Campus.”  Presentation at the Clickers Conference 2012, Chicago, IL, October 25-26, 2012.
Attended audio visual equipment expo:  InfoComm2012, Las Vegas, NV, June 12-14, 2012.
Member Monroe Library Teams and Committees: Learning Commons, Media Services (Team Leader), Technology Team (Team Leader), Library Rank and Tenure Committee,     Malia Wiley, non-tenured faculty review committee (chair), Mary Finnan Hines, non-tenured faculty review committee; University Senate, University Board of Review.  CCUMC (Consortium of College and University Media Centers) CCUMC Board of Directors, institutional director, CCUMC Membership committee, CCUMC Photo sharing project, chair.

Art Carpenter.
Member University Centennial Committee.

Teri Oaks Gallaway.
“Competitive Usability and the Catalogue: A Process for Justification and Selection of a Next-Generation Catalogue or Web-Scale Discovery System.” Library Trends 61.1. (2012). With Mary Finnan Hines.
“Web-Scale Discovery Systems.” With Mary Finnan Hines. AJCU Library and IT Directors Conference. Boston, MA, March 4-7, 2012.
“Fifteen Uses for QR Codes in an Academic Library” Handheld Librarian VI: Mobile Solutions for Libraries That Work. February 1, 2012.
Member Strategic Planning Team – University Senate, Honorary Degrees, Fringe Benefits Committee, LALINC Research and Development Committee.

Mary Finnan Hines.
“Competitive Usability and the Catalogue: A Process for Justification and Selection of a Next-Generation Catalogue or Web-Scale Discovery System.” Library Trends 61.1. (2012). With Teri Oaks Gallaway.
“Web-Scale Discovery Systems.” Presentation at the AJCU Library and IT Directors Conference. Boston, MA, March 4-7, 2012.  With Teri Oaks Gallaway.
Member Civil Rights Grievance Committee, Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum, alternate Student Affairs Policy and Student Handbook Advisory Committee.

Jim Hobbs.
“Mathematics Illuminated.” [DVD review.]  Educational Media Reviews Online. 12 October 2011.
“Science Under Attack: Has the Public Lost Faith in Scientists?” [DVD review.]  Educational Media Reviews Online. 28 June 2012.
Member University Diversity Committee, University Facilities Planning Committee.

Sareeca Hoskins.
“ME! Musical Expressions. An experiential pilot project for African-American girls.”  Graduate Research Symposium Poster submission  SER-AMTA 2011 Conference.
Member University Board of Review.

Elizabeth Joan Kelly.
“Staying In Tune.” Children & Libraries: The Journal Of The Association For Library Service To Children 10.2 (2012): 42-46.
Member University Centennial Committee (Spring 2012-present), LOUISiana Digital Library Committee (2011-present).

Trish Nugent.
“New Orleans Archivists and the Hurricane Katrina Experience.” Presentation for Archivists for Congregations of Women Religious Triennial Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, September 2012.
Member Special Collections & Archives team (Leader), Steering Group, Web Team, Teaching and Learning Team, Art Team, Biever Guest Lecture Committee, Center for the Study of New Orleans Steering Committee, Women’s Studies Committee, University Conciliation Committee (alternate).

Laurie Phillips.
Member  Standing Committee on Academic Planning, University Courses and Curriculum Committee, SCAP subcommittee to review Academic Resource Center.

Deborah Poole.
Member Association of Jesuit Colleges & Universities (AJCU) Directors & Deans Committee, Louisiana Academic Libraries/LALINC Directors & Deans Committee, Deans Council, Library Visiting Committee, Online Education Task Force, Provost’s Council, University Library Committee (ex officio).

Brian Sullivan.
“Developing 21st Century Skills with Student-created Videos.” Presentation for the Ubiquitous Learning Conference, Urbana-Champaign, IL, Oct. 13, 2012.
“Library Technology Featuring Camtasia.” Presentation for the NOLA Information Literacy Forum, New Orleans, LA, Aug 17, 2012.
With Malia Willey “Teaching the Information Literacy Teachers: Fostering a Community of Practice.”  Presentation at the University Libraries Information Literacy Colloquium, New Albany, IN, Aug. 3, 2012.
“Puzzled about distance/online learning services?” Discussion panel at the Louisiana Library Association 2012 Conference, Shreveport, LA.
Member University Sustainability Committee, University Internal Grants Committee, Writing about Literature working group of the Standing Committee of the Common Curriculum, Mission and Ministry Faculty/Staff Advisory Committee, and Standing Committee of Professional and Continuing Studies.

Malia Willey.
“A resource guide to L.M. Montgomery.” Collection Building, 31.4, 148-152, (2012).
Hutchings, J., Willey, M., Stahr, B., & Seidel, K. Panel Discussion for the LALINC [Louisiana Academic Library Information Network Consortium] Information Literacy Committee. Presented at the LOUIS [The Louisiana Library Network] Users Conference, Port Allen, LA, October 16, 2012.
“Developing a student research competition.” Presented at the NOLA [New Orleans, Louisiana] Information Literacy Forum, New Orleans, LA, August 17, 2012.
Sullivan, B., & Willey, M. “Teaching the information literacy teachers: Fostering communities of practice.”  Presented at the Indiana University Libraries Information Literacy Colloquium, New Albany,
IN, August 3, 2012.
“Creating internal development opportunities for library instructors.” Presented at the Louisiana Library Association Annual Conference, Shreveport, LA, March 23, 2012.
NOLA Information Literacy Forum, Co-organizer with Teri Gallaway. 2012.
LALINC [Louisiana Academic Library Information Network Consortium] Information Literacy Committee, Member.  2011-2013 term.
Member Academic Advising Council, Catholic Tradition Workgroup, Liaison Center for Faculty Innovation Advisory Committee, Engaging in Science Lab Workgroup, First Year Experience Steering Committee, First Year Seminar Workgroup, Internal Grants, Alternate Learning Outcomes Subcommittee, Natural Science in Context Workgroup, Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum, Non-voting member.

Kayla Whitehead.
Adviser for a student organization Sigma Alpha Iota.
Member Dean Search Committee–University Library, Collection Development Librarian Search Committee- University Library, Information Resources Team.

Congratulations to each and every one of you on your outstanding accomplishments!   – Posted by Jim Hobbs

Rare photographs of Loyola University in the 1930s

In 2010 the Monroe Library Archives & Special Collections was lucky enough to receive a collection of rare negatives taken on Loyola’s Campus in 1938 & 1939. This was a decade before the school hired Russ Cresson to be the official university photographer in 1949.  These images were taken by Dr. Edward W. Wynne, an Arts & Sciences graduate of Loyola University in 1939. According to his son, Michael D. Wynne, Dr. Wynne was the school’s unofficial photographer during the late 1930s. After receiving his medical degree from LSU, Dr. Wynne went on to become a pediatrician in Lafayette and the surrounding area for 40 years. A prominent member of many philanthropic and medical societies, Dr. Wynne was also a veteran of the U.S. Army Medical Corps. Dr. Wynne died in 1989.

From autopsies and dissections performed in the biology and medical laboratories to Christmas on campus, sporting events and fraternity hazing rituals, this collection provides a unique look at student life on campus in the 1930s.

Fun in Biology Lab

Fun in Biology Lab

Fraternity hazing

Fraternity hazing

Christmas on campus

Christmas on campus

Go to the Louisiana Digital Library to see the rest of the images in this collection!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Bodily Health and Spiritual Vigour, 1913 style

As we recover from overindulging this Thanksgiving, some of us could use a workout. In 1913, William J. Lockington published a series of lectures given to Jesuits on the importance of health–both spiritual and physical. The volume includes lectures on spiritual exercises, dietary guidelines (“Our breakfast, unlike that of Continental countries, is a substantial meal, and all mental application must be avoided for at least half an hour afterwards”), and illustrated workouts. Walks are encouraged to last four, five, or even six hours. Golf is discouraged as “too lengthy for an ordinary mortal subject to the Scriptual limitation of three score and ten years.”

To view this item in its entirety, contact Loyola University Special Collections & Archives at archives@loyno.edu or come see us on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Loyola’s Fieldhouse

Replacing the old gymnasium, the Loyola Field House was completed in 1954. The largest basketball arena in the South when built, the facility was the site of New Orleans’ first non-segregated sporting event when Loyola played La Salle, the defending national basketball champions, in 1954.

Loyola Fieldhouse

Loyola Fieldhouse

The Loyola Field House could accommodate 6,500 people. It was neither heated nor equipped with air conditioning and fans were known to build small fires on the cement floors for warmth in the winter. Loyola discontinued intercollegiate athletic competition in 1972, so the building was renovated in the late 1970s to function as a recreation and intramural center.

Loyola Fieldhouse Interior

Loyola Fieldhouse Interior

In order to truly comprehend the size of this massive structure, check out this image of the Fieldhouse sitting directly behind Buddig Hall during construction of the latter in 1966.

Loyola Fieldhouse During Buddig Hall Construction 1966

Loyola Fieldhouse During Buddig Hall Construction 1966

The Fieldhouse was razed in 1987 to make room for the new combined recreational complex and Freret Street parking garage.

Loyola Fieldhouse Demolition - 1987

Loyola Fieldhouse Demolition - 1987

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

The Fair Grounds: A Thanksgiving Tradition

The New Orleans Fair Grounds began operation in their current location in 1852 as the Union Race Course, making it the oldest site of racing in America still in operation. The racing season is traditionally kicked off at the Fair Grounds on Thanksgiving Day, so ladies, it’s time to get your fancy hats ready.

Special Collections & Archives is home to a few pieces of horse-racing memorabilia.  The Elizabeth Adolph Collection of Early 20th Century New Orleans Sports Memorabilia contains two printed silk programs from the Crescent City Jockey Club dated 1904 and 1906. The Crescent City Jockey Club was established in 1892 at what is now the New Orleans Fair Grounds.  For 16 years, the club ran a winter racing season from mid-December until early April. However, in 1908 Louisiana passed a state law which halted horse racing in New Orleans for a time.  While the club held on to their lease at the fair grounds for several years hoping that racing would be allowed to return, they eventually had to liquidate their assets in the spring of 1913.

While the Fair Grounds are now famously home to Jazz Fest, in 1899 they were also home to the Louisiana Industrial Exposition and Peace Jubilee, “The 1st Annual Exposition…held under the auspices of the New Orleans Progressive Union, in the City of New Orleans, May 8th to 31st inclusive, 1899 .” The fair was repeated in 1900, but seems to have ceased after that date.

To view these items in their entirety, contact Loyola University Special Collections & Archives at archives@loyno.edu or come see us on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Aerial Pictures of Loyola’s Campus

Thanks to modern photography we have the ability to view our campus as it grew and evolved over the last 100 years. Check out these aerial photographs taken of the campus approximately every 25 years since Loyola’s inception. See anything interesting? If you have any questions please feel free to post them here to the blog or stop by Special Collections and Archives!

Aerial Image of Campus 1925

Aerial Image of Campus 1925

Aerial Image of Campus 1950s

Aerial Image of Campus 1950s

Aerial Image of Campus 1975

Aerial Image of Campus 1975

Aerial Image of Campus Today

Aerial Image of Campus Today

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.