Archive for the ‘Student Post’ Category

Library History Resources

In Special Collections & Archives, we have a lot of different materials about the history of Loyola, New Orleans, and the Jesuits, and many years worth of different university publications. However, we also have materials related to the history of the library itself, and many of those items have been digitized!

There are many digitized photographs of students in the old library (all c. 1950-1960):

All of those pictures can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Clicking on one of the photos above will bring you to that collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

There are also copies of library newsletters from 1983-2009. These newsletters were distributed primarily to students and faculty to highlight some of the resources and new technology in the Monroe library.

You can find these newsletters in the Loyola University Library History Collection. To view items from this collection in the Louisiana Digital Library, click on any of the images above. More digitized materials about the history of the library can be found in  the Maroon newspaper, the Wolf Yearbook, and the Bulletins.

While our digitized collections can be accessed 24/7, you can come visit us in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday through Friday, from 9am until 4:30pm.

This post was written by student worker Maureen.

ArchivesSpace

ArchiveSpace

ArchivesSpace is an archives management tool that shows where each box of the archives is. I typed in all the possible Ranges, Sections, Shelves, and floors So I could begin inputting where the objects are. I spent mainly early March inputting the locations. I used most of my March and April internship inputting boxes onto its correct ArchivesSpace, Range, Section, Shelf, and Floor. I am still working on it. I spent almost forty internship hours working on this source.

Blog post by Intern Benjamin Schexnayder

Atilla

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This 1969 adaptation of Atilla marked a special occasion in the history of the NOOA, and even internationally.
As the pamphlet explains,

ATTILA, Verdi’s ninth opera, was written in 1846 for the spring season of La Fenice- the Phoenix- in Venice. It was an instantaneous success, due to the already established reputation of its 33-year old composer, and to its patriotic theme. Four years after its premiere ATTILA was enthusiastically received in New York at Niblo’s Garden, with Marini, for whom it was written, in the title role. ATIILA’s popularity was short-lived, however- Verdi’s later works eclipsing it- and it gradually dropped out of repertories. In 1951 Venice presented a concert version of the opera, but it was not until 1962 that the work was staged in Florence. This was followed by an English performance by Sadler’s Wells, and in the past few years revivals have been mounted in Germany, Austria, Italy, Poland and Argentina. The New Orleans Opera’s production is the first in the United States since the middle of the last century.

Not only that, in this pamphlet there is cover art, and the whole script was printed, which is rather new.  It is rather interesting to flip through and see the English version along with the Italian, so maybe you could learn some helpful phrases such as Qual suono?, which means ‘what is with all of the shouting?’.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1969, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.

Mary Ann Kennedy 20th Century Catholic Brochures Collection

This collection of Catholic pamphlets was built by Mary Ann Kennedy of Little Rock, Arkansas over the course of the 20th century. They provide insight into the Catholic view on subjects ranging from dating and homosexuality to Buddhism and “how to be liked by others.” The Special Collections finding aid for this collection states:

“Tracing their roots back to St. Alphonsus Liguori and his creation of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Redemptorists) in 1732, the Liguorian Magazine was founded in 1913 by American Redemptorists as a pastoral companion guide for Catholics. Their mission was to “[convey] a timely pastoral message to Catholics on matters of faith, Christian living, and social justice, in order to continue their conversion to Christ.” Stemming from Liguori, Missouri, Liguori Publications became the largest distributor of Catholic pamphlets of the St. Louis Province, eventually buying out the Jesuit run Queen’s Work pamphlets, their largest competitor.”

The Catholic University of America has a similar collection containing the Queen’s Work pamphlets, which can be accessed here.

Want to learn more about Buddhism? Check out this pamphlet from 1983-

Not sure if that fortune you received was really accurate? This 1939 pamphlet has all the answers-

Need to get your morals in check? Look no further than this 1943 publication-

Want a refresher on your please and thank yous? This 1942 booklet has you covered-

Want to learn more about Catholic teaching this Lent? This pamphlet from 1968 will teach you more about what Pope Francis’ role is in the church-

Feeling a little stressed as the semester starts to wrap up? This pamphlet from 1983 will have you feeling relaxed and refreshed-

Still worried? This pamphlet from the 80′s should help alleviate some of those anxieties-

Did you give up four letter words for Lent? This 1943 pamphlet explains the horrors of cussing-

You can view the pamphlets in the Mary Ann Kennedy 20th Century Catholic Brochures Collection in Special Collections & Archives, 3rd Floor, Monroe Library, Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm. You can also check out the SC&A tumblr page here!

Posted by student worker Maureen.

Happy April Fools’ Day!

It’s April Fool’s Day — a day to make jokes and pull harmless gags.

The Loyola University New Orleans Maroon is no stranger to pulling a joke on its readers. Throughout the years, The Maroon — or should I say, The Moron — has published issues riddled with gag articles.

In 1932, The April Fools’ issue of the Moron is in no short supply of laugh-worthy articles. One that stands out in particular being “University Adds Hop-Scotchers to Sports List” because “It is high time that Loyola entered in the field of major sports…”

The front page headline of the April 1, 1966 Moron reads, “Sicard Named Dean of MEN; Jolly Elated.” The article features quips from Mrs. Mary Sicard and Father Homer Jolly. 

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The 1931 issue of the Moron takes a somewhat darker spin on April Fools. The front page story tells of two professors at Loyola who had been found “shot” and goes into detail on how Scotland Yard was sending over “the redoubtable Sherlock Holmes, ably assisted by his aide-de-camp, the well-known Dr. Watson.”

You can find the 19301933, and 1976 issues of The Moron by clicking the years, or find all the the issues of The Maroon (and The Moron) here!

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives wishes you a Happy April Fools’ Day!

Posted by Student Worker Samantha.

A Night at the Opera

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On February 10th, at around 7:30 p.m., I walked into the Mahalia Jackson Theater. I gave the staff my ticket, and walked in. It seemed a little bland at first, but I got a a soda at the bar and made my way to my seat. It was in the center, in the middle of the large auditorium, so it was perfect. They called for the start at 7:55, and then, the curtains rose at around 8:10 after announcements. That’s when a man hobbled to the center of the stage, and started to break out into song about a demon barber.

The New Orleans Opera Association performed Sweeney Todd last weekend, and I had the chance to go see it. After scanning the pamphlets for months, I must admit, I was curious to see the opera for myself.

Although they missed out a chance to make it a dinner theater, it was still amazing. The voices were extremely talented, the set was wonderful, and how they managed to make blood spurt 10 feet into the air still confuses me. If anyone is not familiar with the story, I apologize. It is exactly what it sounds like. The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Sweeney Todd, slit throats with a razor in order to fulfill his thirst for revenge. They inconspicuously managed to put a device on the victims and make blood spurt, even getting some on the orchestra, before making the chair seat drop and the body fell through the floor and into the basement, where they were ground up for meat pies. That thankfully was just props.  The show totaled up to 3 hours, with a 20 minute intermission, and it was 11 when I got out. Even though I was absolutely tired, ready to peel my makeup off and curl up in some blankets, I had such a wonderful time.

For anyone that hasn’t gone to see the New Orleans Opera, I highly recommend you go. They’re currently in their 74th year, so if there’s any year that you should go, it’s the next. They have numerous performances planned until then, so if you want to have a night of pure talent and have your mind blown, give them a visit!

We also have an exhibit on the New Orleans Opera Association in Special Collections & Archives and  pamphlets in our digital collections if you are curious to learn about their history.

-This blog was written by student worker Miranda

Protests Throughout Loyola’s History

Loyola University New Orleans is no stranger to the idea of protests. Over the years, students have participated in protests on campus, in New Orleans, and even in Washington, D.C. There have even been a few protests against Loyola at times.

In 2001, in the wake of 9/11, a group of Loyola students traveled to Washington D.C. (pictured above) “to represent Louisiana in an anti-war rally.” The editorial piece comments on – but is “neither condemning nor condoning” – the irony that the protesters were speaking against both the government and the United States as a whole, yet were seeking to prove how the attacks on September 11th had inspired the citizens to embrace patriotism.

Again in 2002, Loyola Law Professor William Quigley joined a small group of protesters on St. Charles Avenue against the “looming war on Iraq” shortly after returning from a trip to Iraq with the organization Voices in the Wilderness. He then had a panel discussing his trip and is quoted saying, “Seeing these people, I saw they are just like us.” He said that many of the people he spoke with on his trip were fearful of the upcoming war with the U.S.

Also in 2002, a group of about 100 protesters congregated outside of the Loyola University Law School campus to express their disapproval of Loyola’s invitation to Kim Gandy to speak on campus. Gandy, an alum of the Law School, was president of the National Organization for Women at the time and was vocal about her pro-choice stance on abortion.

In 2011, three Loyola students made their way to Washington D.C. to participate in the March for Life (pictured above). The Loyola Maroon newspaper featured an article voicing opinions of students on both sides of the issue. Margaret Liederbach was pro-life, but had some issues with parts of the movement as a whole, stating, “By restricting the movement to a religious – and primarily Christian context, we lose sight of the fundamental humanitarian issue at hand.” Ashley Nesbitt and Tori Buckley who take the pro-choice stance said, “The reasons a woman might choose abortion are endless; regardless, it is unfair for a single individual to decide whether abortion is the right decision for other women.”

Most recently, on January 21, 2017, people from all over the nation came together in Washington D.C. to protest President Donald Trump on the day after his inauguration. Several students from Loyola made the trip to participate in the Women’s March on Washington. The Loyola Maroon also published an opinion piece written by one of the students in attendance at the march, and Special Collections & Archives is collecting march-related materials.

These are just some of the times Loyola has been involved in protests, whether locally or nationally, throughout its history.

Written by student worker Samantha.

Recent Undergrad Theses from the Digital Archives

Whether it’s for the Honors program or a senior capstone project, many Loyola students undertake the feat of writing a thesis towards the end of their undergraduate careers. They serve as an interesting look into the research and interests of Loyola’s diverse student body. These theses eventually make their way into Loyola’s Special Collections and Archives, where they’re added to the Electronic Theses Digital Archive.

Devon Vance, a 2012 graduate in music performance, wrote a thesis entitled Occupational injuries of the classical horn player for her honors thesis. She writes in her abstract:

  • “Injuries in musicians, though common, are also commonly kept quiet in the musical community. Fear of losing a gig or being seen as unreliable or weak can end careers… This guide presents information on the causes of many musicianship injuries, how they affect the player’s ability to perform, and how they can be treated and largely prevented. Information is the key to getting help for those musicians suffering from occupational injuries, spreading awareness to the rest of the musical community about these hazards of playing, and to gain acceptance and understanding for these musicians because injuries are common and are not always a result of the player’s negligence. Educating teachers and instructors is one way to spread awareness and to work to prevent these injuries from ever happening. After all, as music educators, we should educate the student on all aspects of playing, including correct posture and comfort to give the student the best chance at success because music is more than just what comes out of the bell of the horn, music is also what goes into the mouthpiece of the horn.”

Rebecca Urquhart, a 2016 graduate in environmental science, was mentored by professor Craig Hood on her honors thesis entitled Seasonal Bat Ecology at Jean Lafitte Park. In her thesis, which discusses the species and activities of bats in Jean Lafitte Park, she writes:

  • “There is currently not enough data confirm lunar philia or phobia of bat activity at the park… Sites that both had more activity occur on full moons did not always share this high activity on the same month. In April, for example, there was more activity occurring during the full moon at the Education Center and the exact opposite at the Coquille Bridge site. This phenomenon reversed in May, with more activity occurring during a new moon at the Education Center and more activity occurring during a Full moon at the Coquille Bridge site. The inconsistencies in activity could be due to obstruction of the moon by cloud coverage and other weather events. The activity is also not associated with one particular species, there are general trends of high or low activity across all species at these sites during the lunar phase observations. Several years of complete monthly activity will be needed to confirm or deny the hypothesis of bat activity at the park being affected by the lunar cycle.”

For her 2016 honors thesis, psychology student Madeline Janney wrote a book for young readers entitled Tonight We’re Having Red Beans and Rice. Pages from the book are pictured below:

Sociology and Women’s Studies graduate Lauren Poiroux wrote an honors thesis entitled What’s Your Type?: Romantic Partner Selection In Loyola University Men. She describes her research process as follows:

  • “In order to find my sample, I used a method of gathering participants called convenience ‘Snowball’ sampling. Essentially, I asked someone to participate in my study, and after the interview, I ask the participant to give me names of others to contact to be interviewed. The hope with procuring my sample in this way is that it places some responsibility on the participant to find willing participants, which helps to ensure randomness, which ensures a more unbiased study. Through this method, I was able to interview 10 Loyola men, all who interviewed for at least thirty minutes, though the majority had interviews over an hour. All of the men were current Loyola students, with an age range between 20 and 22. All of the men I interviewed were white, which could perhaps be a result of the sampling method. This certainly places a skew on the data, making it not as generalizable to the entire population. Future studies should look at men of other racial backgrounds…”

The Electronic Theses Collection can be found here in its entirety, and other digitized collections from Special Collections and Archives can be found here.

Posted by student worker Maureen.

Photos of the Danna Center

I digitized about 100 photos from the Department of Student Involvement as my first project as a Special Collections intern. Here is a small sample of some of them.

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This Photo depicts a bar and restaurant that existed when my mom went to Loyola located at the current spot of Satchmo’s.

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This Photograph depicts what the cafeteria in the Danna Center used to look like over 30 years ago.

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This photograph depicts a former dessert shop in the Danna Center.

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This photograph depicts what used to be in the spot of the One Loyola Room right in front of the bookstore.

Blog by Student Intern Benjamin.

Gloria’s Top 5 archives picks

The Special Collections and Archives department at Monroe Library is a safe place for history according to literature, correspondence, and documentation. On Loyola’s campus, there are several galleries, and many individual buildings that display art and framed history on the walls in the hallways; but on the third floor of the Monroe Library is a condensed and magical museum of information. If my introduction has not enticed you to explore the archives, maybe my “Top 5 Favorite Collections in the Archives” list will.

5. Germany’s Wild Medicinal PlantsThis collection is digitized, but in order to view the actual book in its entirety, you can request to see it via the in person in Special Collections. It is a collection of antique illustrations of each wildflower and their medicinal properties. The images are beautiful.

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4. The Samway Book Collection – Patrick Samway, S.J. has donated a large portion of his personal book collection to Special Collections & Archives. Made up of almost 3,000 books primarily by Southern writers, I find his particular collection of William Faulkner literature most interesting. On the shelves is at least one of every piece written by William Faulkner; but for most, there made be 6 to even 12 different editions. One title in several languages, print editions, different cover art, etc. For the right kind of person, this is an impressive and fascinating collection of Faulkner literature!

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3. The Marguerite Piazza Papers – A small collection donated by the family of Ms. Piazza, I discovered it while organizing the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit. Ms. Piazza graduated from Loyola in what we called the golden Age of Opera Education. She was one of the first to graduate from the Vocal Performance department in opera studies. However, her life after Loyola was lived among the stars of Hollywood. Known for her talents as a vocalist, dancer, and actress she was stunningly beautiful and very popular. Her personal life was just as interesting. While going through her collection, it’s easy to get lost in her story (previously blogged here).

Piazza aboard American Airlines flight to Memphis after receiving the "Golden Stocking Award" from the hosiery industry for having the most glamorous legs in American, 1956.

2. John Kennedy Toole Manuscript – Yes, this is one of the Toole’s manuscripts – wrapped in a beautiful archive safe box and tied with a brown piece of yarn. There is no definitive “first manuscript” for A Confederacy of Dunces. However, this manuscript was, “donated by Lyn Hill Hayward, a longtime friend of Walker Percy’s, and described by her as the manuscript given Percy by Thelma Toole”.

1. First Edition Copy of Sylvia Plath’s Ariel – Sylvia Plath’s posthumous Ariel was initially published in 1966. This printing is part of the Robert Giroux Collection. Giroux was vice president and partner of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., and his book collection contains many first editions and signed copies of works by 20th century American writers.

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Posted by student worker Gloria S. Cosenza