Archive for the ‘Collection Spotlight’ Category

Cornet Collection

One of the many digitized collections in Special Collections and Archives is the Joseph-Aurélien Cornet, FSC collection. The collection is comprised of Frère Cornet’s field notebooks and over 500 binders containing extensive research on Congolese art and culture. You can read a detailed description of the collection here. The collection is primarily in French and Congolese.

The following images are from Cahier (field notebook) 24, which covers Mission Bawoyo on March 8th to 12th, 1979, and Mission Mapangu ou Bashiliele on June 24th to 27th of the same year. The photographs below document a visit to the village of Muanda-Tende, and includes photos of house types, types of dance, and village residents.

You can view the collection online here at the Louisiana Digital Library. You can also check out some of the other digitized collections from Special Collections and Archives on our website.

During the summer session, we are open Tuesday-Thursday 9am-4:30pm, and Monday and Friday by appointment only.

Nexus Press Collection

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One of the pioneer artist’s book and fine press publishers in the South was Nexus Press, which was born out of an artists’ co-op in Atlanta, GA in 1976. Nexus Press was known for collaboration – artists from around the world were often invited to participate in residencies resulting in a small editions of artist’s books. The books were usually offset-printed, which lent itself to Nexus Press’ bold and spontaneous style. Although the organization shut down its presses in 2006, Nexus Press books continue to be prized by libraries collecting artists’ books. We are lucky to hold a few titles from this esteemed press; you can view more photos and information about some of these books here and here or come to the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of the library to see the Nexus Press collection in person!

New Orleans Review Online

Special Collections & Archives at the Monroe Library hosts scanned back issues of the New Orleans Review, Loyola’s literary journal, in the Louisiana Digital Library. The NOR, for short, was started in 1968 by English department faculty Miller Williams, and has included advisory editors such as Joseph Fichter, S.J., and Walker Percy. In addition to the online collection, Special Collections & Archives also holds the NOR archive which includes correspondence, copy-edits, historical records, and more.

From the NOR website, authors published in the NOR include:

Walker Percy, Pablo Neruda, Ellen Gilchrist, Nelson Algren, Hunter S. Thompson, John Kennedy Toole, Richard Brautigan, Joyce Carol Oates, James Sallis, Jack Gilbert, Paul Hoover, Tess Gallagher, Sherman Alexie, Valerie Martin, Annie Dillard, Everette Maddox, Julio Cortazar, Gordon Lish, Robert Walser, Mark Halliday, Robert Olen Butler, Michael Harper, Angela Ball, Diane Wakoski, Dermot Bolger, Ernest J. Gaines, Roddy Doyle, William Kotzwinkle, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Arnost Lustig, Raymond Queneau, Yusef Komunyakaa, Michael Martone, Matthea Harvey, Bill Cotter, D.A. Powell, Rikki Ducornet, Ed Skoog, and many others.

Current issues of the New Orleans Review can be ordered through their website.

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

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We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

Collection Highlight: M. Aguilar sets

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Occasionally I come across a few rare gems in our public stacks that I carefully rescue to be catalogued in Special Collections. Last week, I gathered many multi-volume sets in series of Spanish theater and poetry published by M. Aguilar in the 1940s-50s. What caught my eye was the hint of color on the top edge of one of the books, and when I pulled it from the shelf I gasped at the bright, intricate stencil that looks to have been airbrushed along the textblock’s head, tail and fore-edge. Some have faded over time along the head, but the edges that have not been exposed to light in some time are as bright as ever. The books vary in size and are all cased in soft leather dyed in various colors. Many feature whimsically illustrated end-sheets as you open the cover, and each has a sepia toned portrait of the author facing the book’s title page. A classy and surprising series indeed! You can now access these books in the Reading Room of SC&A, on the third floor of Monroe Library.

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

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The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

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The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

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These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

Collections Spotlight: Louisiana Women Writers Symposium Collection

In celebration of International Women’s Day, we are shining the spotlight on our Louisiana Women Writers Symposium Collection.

This collection primarily consists of correspondence and photographs from the Louisiana Women Writers Symposium that was held on September 19-20, 1986 at Loyola University New Orleans.

The symposium was funded by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and co-sponsored by Loyola University and the Women’s Studies Consortium of Louisiana. It was co-directed by Dorothy H. Brown and Barbara C. Ewell, who were faculty members of the English department of City College at Loyola University at the time.

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The symposium was held over a day and a half and featured sixteen scholars and moderators with a reading by writer Ellen Gilchrist.

 

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Ellen Gilchrist, Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives

 

Selected presentations from the conference were published with additional essays first in 1988 in New Orleans Review: Special Issue on Louisiana Women Writers, 15:1 (Spring 1988) and Louisiana State University Press in 1992 as a book entitled Louisiana Women Writers: New Essays and a Comprehensive Bibliography.

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The prologue to written for the dedicated issue of the New Orleans Review, does an amazing job at summarizing the significance of the conference, and the scholarship  and authorship presented there, “… the Consortium sought to dramatize through the symposium a critical otherness — another perspective on our past and present that purposely includes female, regional, black, ethnic, working-class, and other excluded minority points of view. It is the reinstatement of those “other” perspectives, which are essential to our cultural self-definitions, that women’s studies and the Consortium are committed.”

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Here is a little Library Lagniappe for you, a discussion on women writers from 1972 (the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement) between Helen Vendler, Nora Ephron, Elizabeth Janeway, and poet Carolyn Kizer, from 1972, hosted in New York City at the 92nd Street Y, Women Writers: Has Anything Changed?


Black History Month and opera

The New Orleans Opera has had the privilege of performing with some of the most talented and accomplished opera singers in the world, including a number of black opera singers. In conjunction with Black History Month, following are a few of the illustrious singers of color who have performed with the NOOA.

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Native New Orleanian Shirley Verrett (pictured here in a 1983 NOOA performance of Tosca) filled in as Carmen for the NOOA in 1980, making her the first black singer to perform the role with NOOA. She had previously been the first black singer to perform the role at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow.

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Bass-baritone Alfred Walker has become an international superstar since he graduated from Loyola’s master’s program in 1996. Walker won the Regional Metropolitan Opera Council Audition and made his Metropolitan Opera debut as Grégorio in Roméo et Juliette in 1998. He has performed with NOOA in Macbeth and Elektra (1994); Madama Butterfly (1995); Andrea Chénier (1996); Rigoletto (1997); and La Bohème (2014). He is pictured above in Loyola’s 1996 performance of Die Fledermaus.

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Another Loyola alum, Giovanna Joseph, has performed supporting roles in Salome and Porgy and Bess with NOOA. In 2011, Joseph founded Opera Creole, a nonprofit company dedicated to discovering and performing music written by nineteenth century New Orleans Creole men and women of color. She is pictured above (left) with her daughter Aria Mason (right) and singer Hope Briggs (middle) in NOOA’s 2010 Porgy and Bess; this performance marks the first time a mother and daughter both had singing roles in the same NOOA production (image courtesy of Givonna Joseph).

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Mezzo-soprano Débria Brown was another trailblazing New Orleans native who battled prejudice to become an international opera star. Brown graduated from Xavier University and began her professional career with the New York City Opera opposite Loyola alum and fellow New Orleanian Norman Treigle. She later achieved success singing in Germany and Vienna before becoming a professor of voice at the University of Houston Moores School of Music. Brown performed with NOOA in Un Ballo in Maschera (pictured above in 1981) and Eugene Onegin (1995).

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Opera soprano Marquita Lister performed two of her signature roles in Porgy and Bess and Salome with NOOA in 2002. Lister has also served as the national spokesperson for the Negro “Spiritual” Scholarship Foundation.

A large portion of the New Orleans Opera Association Archives are Artists’ Files. These include head shots, press kits, and correspondence, in many cases sent by artist management companies, for artists who performed with NOOA as well as many who didn’t. These files contain beautiful graphic materials for  some of the most famous opera singers of the 20th century, including many of the world’s leading black singers.

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LaVergne Monette

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Barbara Hendricks

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Simon Estes

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Barbara Conrad

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Vinson Cole

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Grace Bumbry

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Betty Allen

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Donnie Ray Albert

Many if not all of these singers faced intense racial prejudice in establishing the rights of black singers to perform with regional, national, and international opera companies. Alison Kinney’s “As the Met Abandons Blackface, a Look at the Legacy of African Americans in Opera” details struggles faced by black American opera singers as well as the use of white singers to portray black characters, as does Naomi Adele André’s Blackness in Opera (available for checkout from the Monroe Library).

The materials pictured above, and many more like them, are available for research in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives at Special Collections & Archives‘ Booth-Bricker Reading Room Monday – Friday from 9am-4:30pm.

Collection Spotlight: Norman Treigle Papers

In memoriam of the anniversary of Norman Treigle’s death on February 16th, 1975 we are spotlighting our Norman Treigle Papers collection.

Adanelle Wilfred (Norman) Treigle was born in New Orleans on March 6, 1927, the youngest of five children born to Wilfred and Claudia (Fischer) Treigle. His introduction to music was through his mother, who played both piano and organ, and his singing career began as a boy soprano in a church choir.

Determined to pursue a musical career, Treigle entered Loyola University where he studied with Elisabeth Wood for seven years. He won the New Orleans Opera House Auditions of the Air in 1947 and made his operatic debut with the company as the Duke of Verona in Roméo et Juliette. Over the next six years he developed a repertoire of twenty-two roles with the New Orleans Opera and studied both drama and ballet to prepare for his career as a singing actor. He sang solos at religious services of all denominations, performed with the New Orleans Pops and the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, and hosted a radio show on WWL. According to his daughter Phyllis, the proprietors of WWL suggested that he change his name from “Addie” to a more professional stage name, and after studying various names, Treigle finally chose “Norman,” the name previously bestowed on his son.

Although only 5’11” and 140 pounds, Treigle had a voice that belied his size and a dazzling acting ability. He was known for his dominating portrayals of Reverend Blitch in Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah, Grandpa Moss in Copland’s The Tender Land, Escamilio in Carmen and Mephistopheles in both Faust and Mephistofele as well the lead roles in Boris Gudonov, Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Gianni Schicchi. He and Beverly Sills often sang together in operas including Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Coq d’Or and Giulio Cesare that was produced to showcase Treigle in the City Opera’s premiere in new facilities at Lincoln Center in 1966.

Despite a vagabond career, he remained a New Orleanian. He and his second wife Linda lived near the lakefront with her daughter, Lisa, who Treigle adopted. His daughter Phyllis Susannah (born in 1961 and named after Phyllis Curtin, Treigle’s Susannah co-star) lived with her mother. He smoked constantly, drank Scotch, enjoyed wagering on the races at the New Orleans Fairgrounds, and was admired for his sense of humor and generosity.

On February 16, 1975, Treigle’s first wife, Loraine, found Treigle dead in his New Orleans apartment. The cause of death originally was thought to be result of a bleeding ulcer, but was later determined by the coroner to be an overdose of sleeping pills. Norman Treigle was forty-seven years old.

The Norman Treigle Papers consists of materials detailing the career and legacy of the opera singer. Press, programs, correspondence, contracts, photographs, costumes, and audio-visual materials are included in the collection. The bulk of the collection covers his years as a performer with some additional materials gathered after his death.

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The collection is comprised of the following series:

Series I: Press & Programs

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Contracts, Royalties & Financial

Series IV: Public Relations & Memorial Fund

Series V: Sheet Music –  Subseries I: Opera Scores – Subseries II: Oratorios and Cantatas – Subseries III: Art Songs & Popular Songs

Series VI: Educational Resources

Series VII: Photographs

Series VIII: Brian Morgan Research Files

Series IX: Scrapbooks & Oversized Publications

Series X: Audio-Visual Materials – Subseries I: Moving Images – Subseries II: Audio

Series XI: Costumes

You can view and research the Norman Treigle Papers Monday through Friday from 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives of Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans.

Recent Undergrad Theses from the Digital Archives

Whether it’s for the Honors program or a senior capstone project, many Loyola students undertake the feat of writing a thesis towards the end of their undergraduate careers. They serve as an interesting look into the research and interests of Loyola’s diverse student body. These theses eventually make their way into Loyola’s Special Collections and Archives, where they’re added to the Electronic Theses Digital Archive.

Devon Vance, a 2012 graduate in music performance, wrote a thesis entitled Occupational injuries of the classical horn player for her honors thesis. She writes in her abstract:

  • “Injuries in musicians, though common, are also commonly kept quiet in the musical community. Fear of losing a gig or being seen as unreliable or weak can end careers… This guide presents information on the causes of many musicianship injuries, how they affect the player’s ability to perform, and how they can be treated and largely prevented. Information is the key to getting help for those musicians suffering from occupational injuries, spreading awareness to the rest of the musical community about these hazards of playing, and to gain acceptance and understanding for these musicians because injuries are common and are not always a result of the player’s negligence. Educating teachers and instructors is one way to spread awareness and to work to prevent these injuries from ever happening. After all, as music educators, we should educate the student on all aspects of playing, including correct posture and comfort to give the student the best chance at success because music is more than just what comes out of the bell of the horn, music is also what goes into the mouthpiece of the horn.”

Rebecca Urquhart, a 2016 graduate in environmental science, was mentored by professor Craig Hood on her honors thesis entitled Seasonal Bat Ecology at Jean Lafitte Park. In her thesis, which discusses the species and activities of bats in Jean Lafitte Park, she writes:

  • “There is currently not enough data confirm lunar philia or phobia of bat activity at the park… Sites that both had more activity occur on full moons did not always share this high activity on the same month. In April, for example, there was more activity occurring during the full moon at the Education Center and the exact opposite at the Coquille Bridge site. This phenomenon reversed in May, with more activity occurring during a new moon at the Education Center and more activity occurring during a Full moon at the Coquille Bridge site. The inconsistencies in activity could be due to obstruction of the moon by cloud coverage and other weather events. The activity is also not associated with one particular species, there are general trends of high or low activity across all species at these sites during the lunar phase observations. Several years of complete monthly activity will be needed to confirm or deny the hypothesis of bat activity at the park being affected by the lunar cycle.”

For her 2016 honors thesis, psychology student Madeline Janney wrote a book for young readers entitled Tonight We’re Having Red Beans and Rice. Pages from the book are pictured below:

Sociology and Women’s Studies graduate Lauren Poiroux wrote an honors thesis entitled What’s Your Type?: Romantic Partner Selection In Loyola University Men. She describes her research process as follows:

  • “In order to find my sample, I used a method of gathering participants called convenience ‘Snowball’ sampling. Essentially, I asked someone to participate in my study, and after the interview, I ask the participant to give me names of others to contact to be interviewed. The hope with procuring my sample in this way is that it places some responsibility on the participant to find willing participants, which helps to ensure randomness, which ensures a more unbiased study. Through this method, I was able to interview 10 Loyola men, all who interviewed for at least thirty minutes, though the majority had interviews over an hour. All of the men were current Loyola students, with an age range between 20 and 22. All of the men I interviewed were white, which could perhaps be a result of the sampling method. This certainly places a skew on the data, making it not as generalizable to the entire population. Future studies should look at men of other racial backgrounds…”

The Electronic Theses Collection can be found here in its entirety, and other digitized collections from Special Collections and Archives can be found here.

Posted by student worker Maureen.