Archive for the ‘#howtotuesdays’ Category

#howtotuesday: Settle in LA

Today’s #howtoTuesday is for the time-traveling Louisiana settler–1911, to be exact. Louisiana for the Settler details the agricultural resources available in our state in the early 20th century.

The tome highlights our “marvelous soils,” “wonderfully fertile” fields, safe environment for raising livestock, and more. There’s even a guide to how much money in revenue different crops will produce per acre:

The images in this blog post come from a digitized copy of the book from Cornell University hosted by the Hathi Trust. You can also read the book in person in Special Collection & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Imagine a Presidency

In this election day edition of Found in the Archives we take a look at My First Days in the White House.

Many people dream of becoming President of the United States, but few write a detailed “account” of their first 100 days in office before they announce their candidacy. Huey P. Long did.

At the time of his assassination, Long was serving as a United States Senator from Louisiana, after having served as Louisiana’s Governor from 1928-1932.  Widely considered to be a potential candidate in the 1936 Presidential elections, Long had penned his imaginings and the volume was quickly published after his death in September 1935. The forward reads:

This volume is presented as a prophecy by its Author, the late Huey Pierce Long, wherein he endeavored to portray what he would have done had he become President and how he would have conducted the national government; setting forth his impressions of what he believed would be the reaction of the people referred to and the public, generally.

In the book Long imagines detailed conversations between himself and many prominent figures as he cajoles them into joining his cabinet and realizing his vision.  In the passage below John D. Rockefeller Jr. joins the team.

Turning to Aldrich, I inquired:

“Do you believe Mr. Rockefeller would accept the chairmanship of a committee of business men, bankers and industrialists to draft me a plan to carry out my Share Our Wealth program?”

“I believe so, Mr. President,” replied Aldrich, “But I should like to confirm that by telephone.”

I indicated the telephone on my desk.

“Call him now,” I said.

In a few minutes Aldrich was relating our conversation to John D. Rockefeller, Jr., at his home in New York City. From his replies it was obvious that Mr. Rockefeller was accepting the chairmanship. When Aldrich hung up the phone, he turned around and said:

“Mr. President, Mr. Rockefeller will serve as chairman of your committee.”

“That’s fine,” I said. “His services will allay fear throughout the business world.”

The volume features many triumphant illustrations by Cléanthe, picturing the Presidency that never was:

My First Days in the White House is available for research Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30 at the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Gardening

George Washington Cable (1844-1925) is well known for his writing depicting Creole life in nineteenth century New Orleans (most notably Old Creole Days and The Grandissimes). Less well known, perhaps, is his penchant for gardening, and his 1914 book The Amateur Garden. Illustrated with many photographs of home gardens, Cable’s book asks such important questions as “Where to Plant What?”

Hence the initial questions – a question which every amateur gardener must answer for himself. How much subservency of nature to art and utility is really necessary to my own and my friends’ and       neighbors’ best delights? For – be not deceived – however enraptured of wild nature you may be, you do and must require of her some  subserviency close about your own dwelling.

Cable offers additional advice and encouragement to the amateur:

“Muffle your architectural angles in foliage and bloom”

And from Cable’s own garden:

“Some clear disclosure of charm still remote may beckon and lure”

The entire book The Amatuer Garden has been digitized and made available on the Internet Archive.

More recent gardening help can be found in “Gardening in New Orleans: A Publication of the New Orleans Gardening Society”.

Published in 1952, this volume walks the home gardener through all manner of foliage, including chapters on ferns, flowering vines, and azaleas, just to name a few.

Encourage your green thumb and come in to Special Collections and Archives to view these books for yourself!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Identifying Microscopic Fungi

When I was looking through our stacks for a special volume to blog about, I came across Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi.

I was initially impressed by the illustrations…

Then, I found written imagery that showed signs of an eccentric at work, which peaked my interest…

Made curious, I did a little research… and found a man with a truly fascinating life!

M.C. Cooke did not have much in the way of a formal education but wrote hundreds of articles and books on botany and mycology. Collected roughly 46, 000 specimens, contributed over 20 years of service to museum collections, while editing journals and founding societies.

Mordecai, was a busy guy!

Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi, is viewable in its entirety at the Internet Archive online, or by visiting the Special Collections and Archives anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 – 4:30.

#howtotuesday: Creole Cooking

Today’s #howtoTuesday teaches us how to cook classic Creole dishes circa the early 20th century.

The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book has been published periodically since the early 1900s. Special Collections & Archives has the fourth edition, published in 1910.

“The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book is not designed for chefs of cuisines; it has been prepared with special appreciation of the wants of the household and of that immense class of housekeepers who, thrown upon their own resources and anxious to learn, are yet ignorant of the simplest details of good cooking…”

Recipes include classics, like Cafe au Lait, as well as less common dishes, like Stingaree (stingray), “a fish that the Americans laugh at, not dreaming of the possibilities for a delicate dish that lurks within its wings.”

In keeping with the slow food movement, the book also includes lists of seasonal meat and produce as well as menu ideas.

The book has been digitized in full by Cornell University and is available in the Internet Archive. Other editions have also been digitized (1916, 1922).

The Picayune’s Creole Cook Book is available to view in Special Collections & Archives Monday -Friday between 9am and 4:30pm.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesdays : Learning to Spell in 1865

With the start of a new school year it’s always good to brush up on your spelling and here at Loyola’s Monroe Library’s Special Collections and Archives we have found just the primer : Chaudron’s Spelling Book: Carefully prepared for family and school use

In 1865, Madame Adelaide de Vendel Chaudron (writer, translator, and resident of Mobile, Alabama) created a slight volume of spelling instruction. Though the book small, Chaudron and her publisher S.H. Goetzel’s aspirations for the volume were somewhat sizable. They likened the lack of standardization in schoolbooks in the United States to an “evil” that the Civil War had at least temporarily delivered the publishing industry due to the “scarcity of materials”.

Those concerns aside, the volume’s rustic woodblock illustrations and lively and somewhat nonsensical verses make enjoyable use of the vocabulary, spelling, and pronunciation lessons therein.

Enjoy several of its charming pages below.

This volume is housed in the Special Collections and Archives of the Morgan Library.

For a more in-depth look at this volume you can peruse it in its entirety over at the Internet Archive.

#howtotuesday: Speak New Orleanian

New to town? You will find that New Orleanians have a unique way of speaking, and it can sometimes take some getting used to. Today’s Found in the Archives is here to help.

First things first: How to pronounce New Orleans. For the “correct” way, let us turn to the The Yat Dictionary by Christian Champagne.

It may be useful to review “Actual Dialogue Heard of the Streets of New Orleans” by consulting F’Sure! published in 1978 by New Orleans cartoonist Bunny Matthews.

And last, but certainly not least, every New Orleanian should watch “Yeah You Rite!” , a gloriously 1980s documentary on the variety of New Orleans accents and dialects. The Monroe Library has a DVD copy you can check out. But in the meantime, enjoy dis lagniappe, dahlin’! 


Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Manage Muskrats

If you are anything like me, you haven’t given a lot of thought to the muskrat. When it comes to local semiaquatic rodents, my mind goes immediately to the nutria, the much-maligned destroyer of our wetlands. But the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has given a lot of thought to the muskrat. In fact, sixty-five years ago they wrote the book on it.

The Muskrat in the Louisiana Costal Marshes was published in 1949, and represents the work of a five-year study, conducted 1940-1945, into the “ecology, population trends…and managing and producing muskrats on the Louisiana coast.”

It is a technical text, but does provide an interesting overview of the history of the animal in the state

As well as photographs of the fieldwork of the study

And of course, the elusive muskrat himself.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtoTuesdays: Play piano

Today’s #howtoTuesday is a collection of 19th century piano music. The first section of the book is J. B. Cramer’s Instructions for the Piano Forte. The German Johann Baptist Cramer was born in Mannheim, Germany but spent most of his life in London, and was described as “one of the father of the church of pianoforte playing”  by pianist Edward Dannreuther. Beethoven was a fan of Cramer’s piano studies (short pieces for improving technical ability) and selected some of them for practice by his nephew, so if you decide to learn how to tickle the ivories from this volume, you’ll be in good company.

This particular volume was bound with several 19th century popular piano pieces which probably fall outside of the beginner’s abilities.

You can visit Instructions for the Piano Forte in person in Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesdays: 19th C. Engineer

Ever wondered how to be a nineteenth century engineer? We have the book for you!

The operative mechanic and British machinist; being a practical display of the manufactories and mechanical arts of the United Kingdom was published in America in 1826 by Cary and Lea of Philadelphia.

Title

Two volumes bound as one book, the Operative Mechanic instructs one on all manner of engineering.

contents

Including wind mill construction:
windmills

As well as the basics of harnessing “Animal Strength”:

animal

Feel free to come and see The Operative Mechanic for yourself in Special Collections and Archives!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.