Archive for the ‘#howtotuesdays’ Category

Help Yourself with the Last Self-Help Book

#howtotuesday: Help Yourself with the Last Self-Help Book

Why can you size up Saturn, or a stranger, in 10 seconds—but not yourself, whom you have known all your life?

Why is the Self the only object in the Cosmos which gets bored?

Why is it that the Self—though it professes to be loving, caring, to prefer peace to war, concord to discord, life to death; to wish other selves well, not ill—in fact secretly relishes wars and rumors of war, news of murders, obituaries, to say nothing of local news about acquaintances dropping dead in the street, gossip about neighbors getting in fights or being detected in sexual scandals, embezzlements, and other disgraces?

These are but a tiny sample of the questions posed by Walker Percy in Lost in the Cosmos: The Last-Self Help Book.

Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book is a tongue-in-cheek, mock self-help text containing essays, multiple-choice quizzes, and “thought experiments” authored by past Loyola University New Orleans mentor and professor Walker Percy. The book, Percy’s most popular work of non-fiction, is formatted to satirize standard self-help books while encouraging readers to seriously contemplate their Self and existential situation. Percy embarks upon an array of topics—religion, science, movie trivia, fear, exhilaration, sex, boredom—and discusses both contemporary events and popular figures (e.g. Jonny Carson, Mother Teresa, and Carl Sagan).

Loyola University Special Collections & Archives holds nine copies of Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book—five copies feature the signature (and in a single case, a rather lengthy inscription) of Walker Percy with one additional copy being inscribed by the book’s editor, Robert Giroux.

Are you interested in taking “A Preliminary Short Quiz so that you may determine whether you need to take the Twenty-Question Self-Help Quiz” or courageously embarking upon Percy’s “Twenty-Question Multiple-Choice Self-Help Quiz to test your knowledge of the peculiar status of the self, your self, and other selves, in the Cosmos, and your knowledge of what to do with your self in these, the last years of the twentieth century?” If so, visit Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 or Friday 9:00-12:00!

For further study of Walker Percy, Loyola University Special Collections & Archives holds a significant amount of material relating to the author including the Walker Percy Papers, Percy-Walsh Correspondence, Percy-Romagosa Collection, Percy-Suhor Letters, and Patrick Samway, S.J Papers.

#howtotuesday: Prevent Yellow Fever

#howtotuesday: Prevent Yellow Fever

Above: sanitary map of the city of New Orleans

Yellow Fever, sometimes called Yellow Jack or Yellow Plague, is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of female mosquitoes of the Aedes aegypti species. Most cases of Yellow Fever cause mild symptoms including fever, headache, and chills; however, approximately 15% of cases develop into toxic, severe stages of recurring fever, jaundice (yellowing of the skin) due to liver damage, abdominal pain, vomiting, and internal bleeding.

The city of New Orleans was plagued by several epidemics of Yellow Fever during the 19th century, the most deadly in 1853. Sadly, in a single year, 7,849 residents of New Orleans (population: 154,000) succumbed to the illness.

The Yellow Fever epidemic of 1853 led to further study of the viral disease and publication of The Cause and Prevention of Yellow Fever at New Orleans and Other Cities in America, a text investigating “the origin and mode of transmission of the great epidemic of last year, together with all causes affecting the salubrity of the city.”

The publication includes eight foldouts, each employing a map or chart to illustrate data.

Above: chart exhibiting the annual mortality of New Orleans

Local researchers conducted many experiments in an attempt to control the epidemic, including but not limited to, purifying the air by burning tar and firing canons throughout the city (a method only employed once). After identifying mosquitoes as the transmitters of Yellow Fever, efforts were launched to control the breeding of insects, particularly through extensive sanitation–an endeavor largely responsible for ending the crisis.

Interested in learning more about the Yellow Fever epidemic of 1853? Visit us in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 or Friday, 9:00-12:00 where The Cause and Prevention of Yellow Fever at New Orleans and Other Cities in America and additional texts (like this one) are available for viewing!

I hope each of you have a wonderful holiday weekend (and don’t forget to wear a bit of bug spray)!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Be a Bachelor (or Bacheloress) in New Orleans

#howtotuesday: Be a Bachelor (or Bacheloress) in New Orleans

With the arrival of summer holidays, pleasure-seekers descend upon New Orleans in full force. Whether you are an “unattached gentlemen or lady of spirit visiting” or perhaps a long-time “resident in the Paris of America,” The Bachelor in New Orleans provides a candid guide to the Crescent City. The charming handbook, printed in 1942 and illustrated with vibrant block prints throughout, launches directly into heart of the matter with “Chapter 1: Of Drink and the Devil,” a guide to New Orleans’ most potent beverages and notable bars (many of which are still in operation today).

Additional chapters provide the Bachelor with instruction on fine dining (“be kind to your food, and it will love you…so will the chef”), curing loneliness, surviving Mardi Gras, and my personal favorite, how not to be a tourist.

According to The Bachelor in New Orleans, in order to avoid the horror of being mistaken as a tourist, one should keep the following don’ts in mind:

  • Never, never kick garbage cans! This is a cardinal sin for Bachelors in New Orleans.
  • Never stand and stare at any happening, no matter how rare, outrageous, unseemly, or unconventional it may strike you. If an unusual happening is pleasant or gay, a New Orleans Bachelor unobtrusively takes part in it; if it is unpleasant, the Bachelor in New Orleans unobtrusively takes part in something else.
  • Never raise your voice above Martha Raye’s level. People across the river and in adjoining parishes have to sleep. In the French Quarter, of course, no one could sleep if a sudden quiet fell in the streets. Bed-occupiers would sit bolt upright, in a cold sweat!
  • Never ask an interesting looking individual if he is an artist. He might be one, in which case he will resent you. And if he is not, he may cause you some embarrassment.
  • Do not attempt to direct traffic or dance bands while over-intoxicated. You will not do your best job if you have had one too many, and a most remarkable and unpleasant snarl may result.

And finally,

  • If you are a male Bachelor, never make what could be considered the first pass at any woman you have not known all your life. If she is interested, or can be satisfactorily interested, she will make the first pass—and if you are a Bachelor in New Orleans, you will know when it happens. This rule does not apply to female Bachelors in New Orleans: being females, they have their own rules about these matters and do what they’re going to do anyway.

At any rate, don’t be a tourist.

For further tips on thriving in 1940’s New Orleans, visit the Special Collections & Archives to peruse The Bachelor in New Orleans in full.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Be Green

It’s a green week at Loyola. Wednesday, April 22 is the university’s Earth Day celebration. And National Arbor Day is celebrated annually on the last Friday of April, so it falls on April 24 this year. The holiday was founded by J. Sterling Morton in 1872 with the express intention of encouraging individuals and groups to plant trees. In 1889, McDonough No. 23 was the first Louisiana school to celebrate Arbor Day. 16 years late, Loyola College followed suit.

According to the March 9, 1905 Times-Picayune, each of the twenty-eight students enrolled in the college were asked to plant a young live oak that afternoon to help provide shade across the fledgling campus. The program included songs and recitations and the Rev. Albert Biever, S.J., first president of the college and later of Loyola University, gave an address. An article in the February 13, 1905 Times-Picayune reported that the trees were brought from St. Charles College in Grand Coteau.

Loyola College opened in 1904 and included both preparatory and college students. In 1911, the New Orleans Jesuits reorganized their educational institutions, and the Loyola University we know today was established in 1912.

Loyola College students, 1906-1907

Loyola’s landscape has continued changing and growing. Most recently, the university announced that the demolished Old Library would be transformed into green space.

Thomas Hall as seen from St. Charles Ave.

Special Collections & Archives preserves a number of collections related to environmental justice in Louisiana, including the John P. Clark Papers, the Gulf Restoration Network Archives, and the Ecology Center of Louisiana Papers.

How do you plan to take Loyola’s history and mission as inspiration to be a little more green this week?

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Dance!

Sometimes new items make their way into Special Collections & Archives that take a little (or a lot of) research to identify. A recent example is this tiny box that was recently donated along with other primarily German 18th and 19th century books.

Neue Anglaisen inscription

Neue Anglaisen title page

Thanks to the diligent research of Associate Dean for Technical Services Laurie Phillips, we think we’ve got this one figured out. Printed sometime in the late 1700s, this little packet contains music scores and dance directions for the Danse Anglaise, or Anglaisen in German, an 18th century form of English country dancing where partners faced each other in lines.

Neue Anglaisen flute and clarinet parts

Neue Anglaisen violin part

Very little information is available about the composer, Carl Jonne, but he is mentioned in Performing Operas for Mozart as performing in the Leipzig opera orchestra in the summer of 1786 and promoting 2 performances of Mozart’s Requiem in April and May of 1800.

Neue Anglaisen dance diagram

Neue Anglaisen dance instructions

The work is dedicated to “Dem Hochgebohrnen Grafen und Herrn, Herrn Heinrich dem LXII, jüngern Reufs Grafen und Herrn zu Plauen, Herrn zu Greitz, Krannichfeld, Gera, Schleitz, Lobenstein unterthänigst gewidmet.”

Neue Anglaisen dedication

Bonus: Here’s a video of a danse Anglaise at the 2010 Grand Napoleonic Ball:

This book, and others like it, can be viewed in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtoTuesday: Yachting

Today’s #howtoTuesday comes from the Southern Yacht Club–the second oldest yacht club in the United States. Founded in 1849 and re-organized in 1878 after the Civil War and the subsequent Reconstruction, the S.Y.C. published this volume in 1892 to cover the organization’s charter, by-laws, racing rules, and more.

The S.Y.C. clubhouses (the organization is now on its fourth structure) have been located in the West End area of New Orleans on Lake Pontchartrain since 1857. Images of the S.Y.C. from other Louisiana repositories are available in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Panorama from West End from Southern Yacht Club, Louisiana State Museum

Sailboats being prepared for a regatta on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans Louisiana, State Library of Louisiana

Southern Yacht Club on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans Louisiana in the early 1900s, State Library of Louisiana

Far View of Southern Yacht Club 1919-03-16, The Historic New Orleans Collection

For more information on the S.Y.C., visit Special Collections & Archives to view the entire S.Y.C. handbook as well as The sesquicentennial of the Southern Yacht Club of New Orleans, 1849-1999 : 150 years of yachting in the Gulf South.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtoTuesday: Loyola style

Today’s #howtoTuesday(s) come from the Maroon newspaper, which has been distributing sage advice to our students for 91 years.

First up is how to buy your books from the bookstore:

then, how to succeed in Basketball:

Finally, we have “How to Succeed in College Without Really Trying,” a board game!

***Don’t lose points by not knowing where the library is!

Looking for more lessons from the University Archives? Come see us on the 3rd floor of the library in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Settle in LA

Today’s #howtoTuesday is for the time-traveling Louisiana settler–1911, to be exact. Louisiana for the Settler details the agricultural resources available in our state in the early 20th century.

The tome highlights our “marvelous soils,” “wonderfully fertile” fields, safe environment for raising livestock, and more. There’s even a guide to how much money in revenue different crops will produce per acre:

The images in this blog post come from a digitized copy of the book from Cornell University hosted by the Hathi Trust. You can also read the book in person in Special Collection & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Imagine a Presidency

In this election day edition of Found in the Archives we take a look at My First Days in the White House.

Many people dream of becoming President of the United States, but few write a detailed “account” of their first 100 days in office before they announce their candidacy. Huey P. Long did.

At the time of his assassination, Long was serving as a United States Senator from Louisiana, after having served as Louisiana’s Governor from 1928-1932.  Widely considered to be a potential candidate in the 1936 Presidential elections, Long had penned his imaginings and the volume was quickly published after his death in September 1935. The forward reads:

This volume is presented as a prophecy by its Author, the late Huey Pierce Long, wherein he endeavored to portray what he would have done had he become President and how he would have conducted the national government; setting forth his impressions of what he believed would be the reaction of the people referred to and the public, generally.

In the book Long imagines detailed conversations between himself and many prominent figures as he cajoles them into joining his cabinet and realizing his vision.  In the passage below John D. Rockefeller Jr. joins the team.

Turning to Aldrich, I inquired:

“Do you believe Mr. Rockefeller would accept the chairmanship of a committee of business men, bankers and industrialists to draft me a plan to carry out my Share Our Wealth program?”

“I believe so, Mr. President,” replied Aldrich, “But I should like to confirm that by telephone.”

I indicated the telephone on my desk.

“Call him now,” I said.

In a few minutes Aldrich was relating our conversation to John D. Rockefeller, Jr., at his home in New York City. From his replies it was obvious that Mr. Rockefeller was accepting the chairmanship. When Aldrich hung up the phone, he turned around and said:

“Mr. President, Mr. Rockefeller will serve as chairman of your committee.”

“That’s fine,” I said. “His services will allay fear throughout the business world.”

The volume features many triumphant illustrations by Cléanthe, picturing the Presidency that never was:

My First Days in the White House is available for research Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30 at the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Gardening

George Washington Cable (1844-1925) is well known for his writing depicting Creole life in nineteenth century New Orleans (most notably Old Creole Days and The Grandissimes). Less well known, perhaps, is his penchant for gardening, and his 1914 book The Amateur Garden. Illustrated with many photographs of home gardens, Cable’s book asks such important questions as “Where to Plant What?”

Hence the initial questions – a question which every amateur gardener must answer for himself. How much subservency of nature to art and utility is really necessary to my own and my friends’ and       neighbors’ best delights? For – be not deceived – however enraptured of wild nature you may be, you do and must require of her some  subserviency close about your own dwelling.

Cable offers additional advice and encouragement to the amateur:

“Muffle your architectural angles in foliage and bloom”

And from Cable’s own garden:

“Some clear disclosure of charm still remote may beckon and lure”

The entire book The Amatuer Garden has been digitized and made available on the Internet Archive.

More recent gardening help can be found in “Gardening in New Orleans: A Publication of the New Orleans Gardening Society”.

Published in 1952, this volume walks the home gardener through all manner of foliage, including chapters on ferns, flowering vines, and azaleas, just to name a few.

Encourage your green thumb and come in to Special Collections and Archives to view these books for yourself!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.