Archive for the ‘#minibookmonday’ Category

Farewell #minibookmonday

Found in the Archives is retiring #minibookmonday. For our last look at some of our tiny treasures, we offer two miniature books from the Nineteenth Century especially appropriate for the Lenten season.

The first, Considerations and Devout Meditations for Every Day During the Season of Lent was published in 1866 in Dublin. Written by an anonymous member of the Society of Jesus, the small volume (3.5X6 inches) offers daily thoughts and quotes from the scriptures.

The second volume, Méditations sur la vie de N.S. Jésus-Christ was published in 1841 in French.  At 2.5 X 4 inches, the Méditations were truly pocket-sized.

We hope you have enjoyed #minibookmondays. Stay tuned for the debut next week of our new feature, #howtotuesdays.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s #minibookmonday is an 1823 printing from Chiswick Press.

Measuring 13.4cm, the volume includes Robert Blaire’s “The Grave,”  Beilby Porteus’s “Death,” Robert Glynn’s “The day of judgment,”  E. Young’s “The last day,” and Samuel Boyse’s “Deity.”

It’s not the most uplifting work.

Like our last #minibookmonday, however, it does have a secret…

The pages at first glance are gold-edged, but held in the right way one can see a painting of Salisbury Cathedral, an Anglican cathedral built in the early 1200s.

This book is part of the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Collection of finely bound and illustrated books. As always, it can be seen in Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of the library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s edition of #minibookmonday presents the The Poems of Ossian.

This tiny treasure, measuring 3 X 5 inches, was published in London in 1819.  It retains it’s original ornate binding, and features a fore edge painting of horse-drawn carriage seen below. In it’s time, this was clearly a finely crafted book.

The Poems of Ossian themselves are less clear. Said to have been “translated” by James MacPherson (1736-1796) from ancient Gaelic texts and the oral tradition of the Scottish Highlands, doubts about the authenticity of poems began shortly after their “discovery” and publication. The charge against the veracity of the poems was largely led by Samuel Johnson, and an official inquiry by the Scottish Highland Society in 1805 supported the notion that MacPherson himself was the author.  The controversy did not do much to dampen interest in the poems themselves, as evidenced by the production of the fine volume we feature today. Indeed, the controversy may have made the poems more popular. (Napoleon was said to be a fan of The Poems of Ossian, and to carry copies with him into battle.) Whatever the ethics of Macpherson’s writings, The Poems of Ossian were  without a doubt widely read and influential on the Romantic period of the 19th century.

Bonus video: scholar Thomas M. Curley discusses his book Samuel Johnson, the Ossian Fraud, and the Celtic Revival in Great Britain and Ireland.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookMonday

Today’s edition of #minibookMonday features another tiny publication from Alembic Press titled, “A Summer Garden.” Illustrated by Muriel Mallows, this book was constructed with an accordion style – folded to open out along four different directions as one walks down the garden path. The opened book builds up to a large linocut of a poppy on the reverse (see last image).

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s edition of #minibookmonday showcases The Life and Exploits of Robin Hood.

This small book, measuring only 3 X 5 inches, was published in London around 1860.  The nineteenth century mass-market publisher of this work, Milner and Sowerby, reproduced classic works of literature on the cheap, using inexpensive paper and producing small, pocket-sized books that sold thousands of copies in their day.  Perhaps due to their inexpensive, almost ephemeral nature, only a few copies of this small edition of The Life and Exploits of Robin Hood can be found in United States libraries today. The Monroe Library is one, so come and see this small swashbuckling tale for yourself!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookMonday

As winter approaches, this week’s #minibookmonday is titled: A Winter Garden. This book was published by Alembic Press and is the fourth in a series of seasonal books about the events in an English garden, with hand coloured illustrations by Muriel Mallows. The narrative is written from the point of view of the garden.

Come by and see it for yourself!

A Winter Garden
A Winter Garden
A Winter Garden

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday Te Deum

Today’s edition of #minibookmonday showcases one of the smallest books in our collection: Te Deum laudamus: solemn tone from the Sarum Psalter.

Measuring less than 3 inches by 3 inches, the small, fine press book was printed by Claire Bolton at The Alembic Press, Hyde Farm House, Marcham, Oxford, England in 1995. The Alembic Press produced a limited and numbered edition of 110 copies of Te Deum, of which the Monroe Library has number 40.

The Te Deum is an early Christian hymn of praise. The colophon of the book notes:

The music type used for printing this book came from St. Mary’s Press (the private press of the Community of St. Mary the Virgin). The type is for setting plainsong on a four-line stave: an ancient form of liturgical music with its origins party in Jewish practice of the apostolic period and partly in Early Christianity.

St. Mary’s Press began in 1854 and in 1890 was visited by Rev. GH Palmer. Together with the Sisters he set up the use and printing of plainchant and translated the texts from Latin to English. The music followed the medieval Sarum rite which had originated at Salisbury cathedral and been adopted by many cathedrals and churches throughout the British Isles.

Come in to Special Collections and Archives to view the tiny Te Deum for yourself!

Bonus video: Te Deum laudamus sung

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookMonday

Title Page

Today’s #minibookMonday is an 1877 Catholic Child’s Prayer Book. Published in Baltimore by John Murphy Co., the book was “compiled with the view of placing within the reach of Catholic children, a complete Prayer Book for Daily Use, in the most compact and attractive form.”

Page 62

It is indeed attractive, with 36 illustrations included within.

Page 126

At 10cm it is one of the smallest non-fine-art books in Special Collections & Archives.

Hand holding book

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

In celebration of the coming of Fall, this week’s #minibookmonday is titled: An Autumn Garden. This book was published by Alembic Press and is the third in a series of seasonal books about the events in an English garden, with hand coloured illustrations by Muriel Mallows, and with prints direct from autumn leaves. The book is constructed as a Jacob’s Ladder of leaves in the fall.

An Autumn Garden

An Autumn Garden

An Autumn Garden

An Autumn Garden

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Introducing #minibookMonday

Welcome to #minibookMonday! The Miniature Book Society defines miniature books as “no more than three inches in height, width, or thickness.” Special Collections & Archives has a number of books that fit this profile as well as many that are slightly larger but still diminutive. Every other Monday we will be bringing you a new baby book from our collection.

This week’s miniature is Dig, An Excavation at Marcham by Claire Bolton. Watch the video above to see what the book looks like when opened. At exactly 3 inches it is a perfect representation of a miniature book. Dig is part of SC&A’s Rosalee McReynolds Collection and is No. 35 of “A limited and numbered edition of forty numbered copies designed, printed and bound by Claire Bolton with lots of help from Nicole Passerotti.”

Join us again on September 28 for another round of #minibookMonday!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.