Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Mardi Gras Literature

As Carnival season heats up and the parades start to roll, it might be fun to delve into the history of Mardi Gras, not just from our current perspective, but from that of years past as well. In the Special Collections & Archives department of the Monroe Library we have Mardi Gras literature from as far back as 1887!

Read about the story of Carnival in New Orleans by the King of Rex, George Soule, written in 1887.

The Carnival in New Orleans

Learn what Carnival was like in the 1950s with, New Orleans Carnival and Its Climax Mardi Gras, by Thomas Di Palma, 1953.

New Orleans Carnival and Its Climax Mardi Gras

Read some of the most intriguing stories of Carnival since 1804 in Reid Mitchell’s, All On a Mardi Gras Day, 1995.

All On a Mardi Gras Day

Share Mardi Gras with your siblings or children with the picture book, A Mardi Gras Dictionary, by Beverly White, 1997.

A Mardi Gras Dictionary

Get the full story from New Orleans’ own Mardi Gras authority by reading Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras In New Orleans, 2001.

Arthur Hardy's Mardi Gras In New Orleans

Or just look through some amazing Mardi Gras photography in, Masking and Madness: Mardi Gras In New Orleans, by Kerri McCafferty, 2002.

Masking and Madness: Mardi Gras In New Orleans

All these titles and more can be found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives department. Come on down to read them today!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Interview with Lee Harvey Oswald

The Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives has recently opened a new exhibit titled, Collection Curiosities. This exhibit features rare and unusual items within our collection. One of those items is a recording on vinyl of an interview with Lee Harvey Oswald titled, Self-Portrait in Red.

On August 21, 1963, just three months before he assassinated President John F. Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald was interviewed by WDSU Radio in New Orleans. Bill Slatter spoke with Oswald on the radio station’s show, Conversation Carte Blanche, about his thoughts on the political situation with Cuba. At the time, Oswald was the secretary for the New Orleans chapter of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, known as the principle voice for Fidel Castro in the United States. The recording features the only recorded statement in existence of Oswald’s opinion about President Kennedy.

Self-Portrait in Red

If the cover art isn’t creepy enough, listen to the actual recording here: Side 1/Side 2, or stop by Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of the Monroe Library to listen at our audio station.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

New NOLA Collection

Special Collections & Archives has a new collection available of assorted New Orleans memorabilia. Usually archival and manuscript collections were assembled by a person, persons, or organization because the materials in the collection have research value when kept together. Sometimes, however, we wind up with an “artificial collection,” or one that didn’t grow out of a particular function but instead has been put together to make items easier to use.

The Collection of New Orleans Miscellany is such a collection as it is comprised of various individual documents, photographs, and other ephemera relating to the history of New Orleans. We’ll be unveiling some of the other items in the collection soon, but for now, we present an invite to the Mirth, Melody & Moonlight ball.

This 1882 invite comes from the Independent Order of the Moon (I.O.O.M.), a comedic Mardi Gras krewe formed in 1881.  The I.O.O.M. followed Rex on Mardi Gras day along with the Phunny Phorty Phellows. Their theme for 1882 was Mirth, Melody & Moonlight — Scenes from Popular Songs. The ball was held at Spanish Fort, an area where first the French and then the Spanish built forts to protect trade routes through Bayou St. John. From the 1880s to around 1920, the land was used for an amusement park that included restaurants and recreational establishments.

Envelope Side 1

Envelope Side 2

This particular invite was sent to Mr. C.E. Staub, a newsdealer, and his wife.

The collection can be viewed in its entirety in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

It’s Carnival Season!

With the arrival of Twelfth Night on January 6th, carnival season has officially begun. In New Orleans this means that carnival balls, parties and parades will occur until the season culminates on Mardi Gras, which this year falls on Tuesday, March 4th. Special Collections and Archives has many materials relating to the celebration of carnival in New Orleans. Today’s edition of “Found in the Archives” will focus on some of the carnival ball invitations found in our New Orleans Carnival Collection.

Lords of Misrule, 1899

Comus, 1878

Atlanteans, 1902

Momus, 1891

As always, you can view these – and much more – for yourself in Special Collections & Archives!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookMonday

Today’s edition of #minibookMonday features another tiny publication from Alembic Press titled, “A Summer Garden.” Illustrated by Muriel Mallows, this book was constructed with an accordion style – folded to open out along four different directions as one walks down the garden path. The opened book builds up to a large linocut of a poppy on the reverse (see last image).

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

A Look at Loyola’s Christmas Past

As Loyola’s students finish up their exams and head home for the holidays, let us take a look at Loyola’s Christmas Past. Should we revive any of these old traditions?

In 1943, at the height of WWII, campus groups were collecting food for the poor at Christmastime.

In 1949 community members as well as university students, staff, & faculty gathered to sing carols on campus.

In 1951 Upsilon Beta Lambda held a Christmas party for local orphans.

In 1959 Loyola’s German Club put on a traditional German Christmas party, complete with a Christmas tree!

To cap it all off, in 1964 the university almost saw a white Christmas as snow blanketed the manger scene in the horseshoe on December 31.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Finals, 1957-1967

The library is packed full of students now that finals have started. While the stress of getting through exams may seem fresh every semester, Loyola students have been studying their way to winter break since the university was founded in 1912. Take inspiration from these students from the past, and good luck!

1957

1957

1965

1965

1967

1967

1967

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Songs of Home

A recent donation to the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives included several pieces of sheet music written about Louisiana and New Orleans. Go ahead and sing along!

The sheet music was part of an additional donation from Anthony J. Stanonis, a Loyola history graduate and author of several books and articles on New Orleans and Louisiana history, including Creating the Big Easy: New Orleans and the Emergence of Modern Tourism, 1918-1945, and Through a Purple (Green and Gold) Haze – New Orleans Mardi Gras In the American Imagination. In 2004, Mr. Stanonis donated much of his research material for his book on New Orleans tourism, which included guides, maps, brochures, booklets, and other literature put out by local public and private groups and businesses, spanning roughly from 1902 to 1960. This collection is an invaluable resource for studying the growth and development of the tourism industry in New Orleans. Many of the pamphlets can be viewed on the Louisiana Digital Library.

New Orleans Sheet MusicNew Orleans Sheet Music

My Louisiana Sheet MusicMy Louisiana Sheet Music

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Antiques: A rare collection

For many of us, the holidays mean fancy food and drink. For your cold-weather (?) libation needs, look no further than Special Collections & Archives for a recipe for a delicious treat.

In 1896, antiques dealer Waldhorn Co. published a small advertisement called “Antiques: A rare collection from old Creole families.” The tiny pamphlet includes poetry by Eugene Field and Mrs. M.E.M. Davis as well as an ode to a drink called Café Brûlot by James A. Morosa. Morosa was inspired to write the verse after sampling a concoction made by Dorothy Dix, one of the first advice columnists and an employee of the New Orleans Daily Picayune.

The drink is a spiced mix of brandy and coffee–perfect for warming up on a chilly winter night. Café Brûlot Diabolique (Devilishly Burned Coffee), as it is formally called, was developed by Jules Alciatore, proprietor of Antoine’s Restaurant, in the 1890s.

View the entire pamphlet in the Louisiana Digital Library or come to Special Collections & Archives to see it in person.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s edition of #minibookmonday showcases The Life and Exploits of Robin Hood.

This small book, measuring only 3 X 5 inches, was published in London around 1860.  The nineteenth century mass-market publisher of this work, Milner and Sowerby, reproduced classic works of literature on the cheap, using inexpensive paper and producing small, pocket-sized books that sold thousands of copies in their day.  Perhaps due to their inexpensive, almost ephemeral nature, only a few copies of this small edition of The Life and Exploits of Robin Hood can be found in United States libraries today. The Monroe Library is one, so come and see this small swashbuckling tale for yourself!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.