Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Vintage commencement

Commencement is this weekend…congratulations to the class of 2017! As you wait to walk across that stage and receive your diploma, enjoy these images of Wolfpack grads from the past.

1950s commencement in front of the "Old Library"

1950s Baccalaureate Mass in Holy Name of Jesus Church

1950s commencement on the steps of the "Old Library"

Saints/Hornets owner Tom Benson preparing to receive Honorary Degree from President James Carter, S.J. in 1987

Students at commencement, 1987

The Landrieu family celebrating after Mitch (third from the left) Landrieu's graduation from Loyola Law, 1987

President James Carter, S.J. (left) with Honorary Degree recipient Mildred Jefferson (center) and Archbishop Hannan (right), 1979

Students at commencement, 1970

Students at commencement, 1970

1950s students at commencement

Commencement, 1981

View more historic commencement photos in the University Photographs collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Happy National Nurses Week!

May 6–12 is National Nurses Week. In commemoration, here are images from Loyola nursing students and staff from the past.

Wondering when these photos were taken, or who’s in them? So are we! Leave a comment to help us identify them.

Nursing students with nun

Nursing students

1950s nursing students on Marquette Hall steps

1950s/1960s nursing students on park bench

2 nursing students setting up "February Heart Month" display

Nursing student getting a freshman beanie on the front steps of Marquette Hall

Student having her pulse taken by a nurse6

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

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We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

Library History Resources

In Special Collections & Archives, we have a lot of different materials about the history of Loyola, New Orleans, and the Jesuits, and many years worth of different university publications. However, we also have materials related to the history of the library itself, and many of those items have been digitized!

There are many digitized photographs of students in the old library (all c. 1950-1960):

All of those pictures can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Clicking on one of the photos above will bring you to that collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

There are also copies of library newsletters from 1983-2009. These newsletters were distributed primarily to students and faculty to highlight some of the resources and new technology in the Monroe library.

You can find these newsletters in the Loyola University Library History Collection. To view items from this collection in the Louisiana Digital Library, click on any of the images above. More digitized materials about the history of the library can be found in  the Maroon newspaper, the Wolf Yearbook, and the Bulletins.

While our digitized collections can be accessed 24/7, you can come visit us in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday through Friday, from 9am until 4:30pm.

This post was written by student worker Maureen.

Marbled Monday: SC&A joins the Art Department

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For this week’s “Marbled Monday” post, I am sharing something a little different than usual. Last Wednesday, I had the pleasure of visiting professor Bill Kitchen’s bookbinding class in Loyola’s art department. As project assistant in Special Collections & Archives, my background in bookbinding and repair is something I love sharing with students interested in book art. I spent the afternoon teaching art students one of my favorite sewing patterns: the French-web or two-hole link stitch binding. I often use this particular sewing structure when repairing dis-bound books in our stacks. I chose to incorporate handmade paper tapes to add a bit of style to the exposed spines of their books and also allow for hard-cover attachment. The students did a fantastic job, and I had a blast working with them!

ArchivesSpace

ArchiveSpace

ArchivesSpace is an archives management tool that shows where each box of the archives is. I typed in all the possible Ranges, Sections, Shelves, and floors So I could begin inputting where the objects are. I spent mainly early March inputting the locations. I used most of my March and April internship inputting boxes onto its correct ArchivesSpace, Range, Section, Shelf, and Floor. I am still working on it. I spent almost forty internship hours working on this source.

Blog post by Intern Benjamin Schexnayder

Collection Highlight: M. Aguilar sets

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Occasionally I come across a few rare gems in our public stacks that I carefully rescue to be catalogued in Special Collections. Last week, I gathered many multi-volume sets in series of Spanish theater and poetry published by M. Aguilar in the 1940s-50s. What caught my eye was the hint of color on the top edge of one of the books, and when I pulled it from the shelf I gasped at the bright, intricate stencil that looks to have been airbrushed along the textblock’s head, tail and fore-edge. Some have faded over time along the head, but the edges that have not been exposed to light in some time are as bright as ever. The books vary in size and are all cased in soft leather dyed in various colors. Many feature whimsically illustrated end-sheets as you open the cover, and each has a sepia toned portrait of the author facing the book’s title page. A classy and surprising series indeed! You can now access these books in the Reading Room of SC&A, on the third floor of Monroe Library.

Atilla

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This 1969 adaptation of Atilla marked a special occasion in the history of the NOOA, and even internationally.
As the pamphlet explains,

ATTILA, Verdi’s ninth opera, was written in 1846 for the spring season of La Fenice- the Phoenix- in Venice. It was an instantaneous success, due to the already established reputation of its 33-year old composer, and to its patriotic theme. Four years after its premiere ATTILA was enthusiastically received in New York at Niblo’s Garden, with Marini, for whom it was written, in the title role. ATIILA’s popularity was short-lived, however- Verdi’s later works eclipsing it- and it gradually dropped out of repertories. In 1951 Venice presented a concert version of the opera, but it was not until 1962 that the work was staged in Florence. This was followed by an English performance by Sadler’s Wells, and in the past few years revivals have been mounted in Germany, Austria, Italy, Poland and Argentina. The New Orleans Opera’s production is the first in the United States since the middle of the last century.

Not only that, in this pamphlet there is cover art, and the whole script was printed, which is rather new.  It is rather interesting to flip through and see the English version along with the Italian, so maybe you could learn some helpful phrases such as Qual suono?, which means ‘what is with all of the shouting?’.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1969, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.

Mary Ann Kennedy 20th Century Catholic Brochures Collection

This collection of Catholic pamphlets was built by Mary Ann Kennedy of Little Rock, Arkansas over the course of the 20th century. They provide insight into the Catholic view on subjects ranging from dating and homosexuality to Buddhism and “how to be liked by others.” The Special Collections finding aid for this collection states:

“Tracing their roots back to St. Alphonsus Liguori and his creation of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Redemptorists) in 1732, the Liguorian Magazine was founded in 1913 by American Redemptorists as a pastoral companion guide for Catholics. Their mission was to “[convey] a timely pastoral message to Catholics on matters of faith, Christian living, and social justice, in order to continue their conversion to Christ.” Stemming from Liguori, Missouri, Liguori Publications became the largest distributor of Catholic pamphlets of the St. Louis Province, eventually buying out the Jesuit run Queen’s Work pamphlets, their largest competitor.”

The Catholic University of America has a similar collection containing the Queen’s Work pamphlets, which can be accessed here.

Want to learn more about Buddhism? Check out this pamphlet from 1983-

Not sure if that fortune you received was really accurate? This 1939 pamphlet has all the answers-

Need to get your morals in check? Look no further than this 1943 publication-

Want a refresher on your please and thank yous? This 1942 booklet has you covered-

Want to learn more about Catholic teaching this Lent? This pamphlet from 1968 will teach you more about what Pope Francis’ role is in the church-

Feeling a little stressed as the semester starts to wrap up? This pamphlet from 1983 will have you feeling relaxed and refreshed-

Still worried? This pamphlet from the 80′s should help alleviate some of those anxieties-

Did you give up four letter words for Lent? This 1943 pamphlet explains the horrors of cussing-

You can view the pamphlets in the Mary Ann Kennedy 20th Century Catholic Brochures Collection in Special Collections & Archives, 3rd Floor, Monroe Library, Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm. You can also check out the SC&A tumblr page here!

Posted by student worker Maureen.

Happy April Fools’ Day!

It’s April Fool’s Day — a day to make jokes and pull harmless gags.

The Loyola University New Orleans Maroon is no stranger to pulling a joke on its readers. Throughout the years, The Maroon — or should I say, The Moron — has published issues riddled with gag articles.

In 1932, The April Fools’ issue of the Moron is in no short supply of laugh-worthy articles. One that stands out in particular being “University Adds Hop-Scotchers to Sports List” because “It is high time that Loyola entered in the field of major sports…”

The front page headline of the April 1, 1966 Moron reads, “Sicard Named Dean of MEN; Jolly Elated.” The article features quips from Mrs. Mary Sicard and Father Homer Jolly. 

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The 1931 issue of the Moron takes a somewhat darker spin on April Fools. The front page story tells of two professors at Loyola who had been found “shot” and goes into detail on how Scotland Yard was sending over “the redoubtable Sherlock Holmes, ably assisted by his aide-de-camp, the well-known Dr. Watson.”

You can find the 19301933, and 1976 issues of The Moron by clicking the years, or find all the the issues of The Maroon (and The Moron) here!

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives wishes you a Happy April Fools’ Day!

Posted by Student Worker Samantha.