Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Flowers Native To The Deep South

Spring is almost here and with it comes flowers.  Our daily routes to and from work that had lost some of their vibrancy during the winter months are slowly and then suddenly awash with new bursts of color.

With the spirit of spring in mind, enjoy these images painted by Caroline Dorman the author of Flowers Native to the Deep South and follow the links for more information on this fascinating woman and her work.

Flowers Native to the Deep South was written by Caroline “Carrie” Dorman in 1958. Dorman (1988-1971) was a native Louisianan artist, author, botanist, horticulturist, ornithologist, historian, archeologist, preservationist, naturalist, and conservationist. She is considered by many to be the mother of the Louisiana conservationist movement having made many monumental contributions to the conservation of our natural, as well as cultural resources.

One of her many contributions to the preservation and conservation of Louisiana’s natural treasures was created as the first female member of the Society of American Foresters. As a member, she almost single-handedly lobbied for years to finally influence state and federal leaders to establish the Kisatchie National Forest, consisting of over 600,000 acres of public lands located in Northeastern Louisiana.

In addition, she willed the public her ancestrial home and gardens to the people upon her death. This home named Briarwood in now the Caroline Dormon Nature Preserve and is known as a “mecca” for horticulturalists and naturalist.

Image of Dorman’s log cabin house at Briarwood, by Rosenthal, James W. (as part of the Historic American Landscapes Survey at Briarwood – more photos follow the link), 1959

At Briarwood Dorman collected and replanted native plants in the gardens to preserve the native ecology of Louisiana.

“The Louisiana iris was of particular importance to Dormon and this species is featured at Briarwood today in the iris bog that is called the Bay Garden. Dormon began her Bay Garden in the 1940s as a place to nourish her seedlings and to record the successes and failures of her cross-pollination experiments with irises found in the wild.”  - From the Library of Congress cataloging notes for images taken at Briarwood.

View of Bay Garden (as part of the Historic American Landscapes Survey at Briarwood)


Flower Native to the Deep South by Caroline Dorman is available for viewing Monday-Friday 9-4, in our Special Collections & Archives on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library

Here’s a little flower-themed lagniappe to get you dancing: Psycho Daisies, by the Yardbirds

History of Theater at Loyola

Loyola recently announced new programs in Theatre Arts and Musical Theatre. While this will provide the opportunity for students to earn degrees in these areas, performing students are not new to the university.

Thespians were a popular student organization from the early years of the university, but it wasn’t until 1967 that the Department of Speech added Drama to its concentration.

More images like these can be found in Loyola’s digital collections and in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Let’s Keep the Good Times Rolling: Jazz Fest 2015

Mardi Gras is over and now we all have to return to our regular lives. There is no longer an excuse to party in the streets of New Orleans or is there? Fortunately, the residents of New Orleans cannot survive too long without another excuse to dance, party, and have amazing food. The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival gives New Orleanians the perfect opportunity to indulge in all of these things once again. In 1970 the first Jazz Festival kicked off in Congo Square. Believe it or not, only 50 people were in attendance, according to Michael P. Smith and Allison Miner’s “Jazz Fest Memories”. This memoir focuses on the life of Allison Miner, one of the festival’s founders, and her experience watching Jazz Fest progress year after year. She includes a multitude of photographs from the festival over the years. She highlights artist such as Stevie Wonder, Willie Nelson, and Gladys Knight (below). Mark your calenders wolfpack. This year’s Jazz Fest starts April 24th! Unfortunately, Jazz Fest occurs extremely close to final exams, but is that going to stop Loyola students? Did Mardi Gras? Why not have a little fun before you have spend a week imprisoned in the library? A little advice for first time goers: In previous years it has rained a lot during the festival. Wear a rain coat and rain boots and party on! Or do are these past attendees did and embrace the mud (below).

Nelson (above)

Knight (above)

Wonder (above)

To view the book mentioned in this blog post and other books about the history of music in New Orleans, visit Special Collections and Archives on the 3rd Floor of the Monroe Library .

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.


The Book As Art: Three Works by Maddy Rosenberg

Since the early production of books, artists have collaborated with printers to produce richly illustrated volumes.  With the arts and crafts movement and subsequent avant-garde groups in the late 19th century, the book as art moved away from traditional formats to incorporate more daring designs and conceptual possibilities. Loyola’s Special Collections and Archives holds many wonderful examples of these creative combinations of text and image in the Rosalee McReynolds Collection. Several more recent acquisitions showcase the work of Maddy Rosenberg, an artist and curator based in New York and Berlin. In The Ruins, Lost and Berlin Bestiary, Rosenberg explores themes of destruction and history as well as architectural forms.

In The Ruins, through the accordion folding and scalloped pages, Rosenberg transforms a traditional two-dimensional book design into a Roman or Grecian wall. Masks reminiscent of early theater line the inside while small statues pop out of exterior corners.

The Ruins (Front Open) – 2009, 3.75 x 6, soft-covered digital version, Edition 6 of 10

The Ruins (Back Open) – 2009, 3.75 x 6, soft-covered digital version, Edition 6 of 10

The Ruins (Closed) – 2009, 3.75 x 6, soft-covered digital version, Edition 6 of 10

Lost combines images from illuminated manuscripts with contemporary images of bombed areas of Baghdad. Rosenberg created this work for the Al-Mutanabbi Street project, organized in response to the car bombing of a street of booksellers in Baghdad. The project asked book artists for works that “reflect both the strength and fragility of books, but also show the endurance of the ideas within them.” By combining old and new forms of illustration, Rosenberg creates a dialogue between tradition and ongoing devastation of communities in Iraq. Since the 7th century when the first Islamic books appeared, ornamental motifs, luxury bindings and illustrations often accompanied text. Lost pays homage to this history and the significance of book making in Iraqi culture.

Lost, Front Cover - 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 1 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 2 and 3 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 4 and 5 - 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 6 and 7 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 8 and 9 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 10 and 11 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

Lost, Page 12 – 2013, 4.5 x 7 inches, edition AP1 of 10, digitally printed, handmade and burned

For Berlin Bestiary, a pop-up book, Rosenberg enclosed images of stone animals found in the streets and parks of Berlin with monumental tombs from the Jewish cemetery in Weisensee, near the city. The second largest Jewish cemetery in Europe, Weisensee remained intact through much of the bombing during World War II but fell into disrepair due to the murder and emigration of much of the Jewish community. Now the site of the Holocaust Concentration Camp Memorial, the cemetery was added to UNESCO’s list of world heritage monuments in 2005.

Berlin Bestiary (Front Open) – 2010, edition 14 of 20, 7 x 5 inches

Berlin Bestiary (Back Open) – 2010, edition 14 of 20, 7 x 5 inches

For more information or to see these wonderful creations yourself, stop by Special Collections and Archives, located on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library. We are open Monday through Thursday 9:00-4:30 and Friday 9:00-12:00. To find out about Maddy Rosenberg and view more of her work, visit www.maddyrosenberg.net.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

The Colors of Carnival

“Mask”- From A Mardi Gras Dictionary by Beverly B. Vidrime

Mardi Gras is finally here! New Orleans is full of tourists and locals alike, all coming together to join in on New Orleans’s biggest and brightest annual celebration. Many of us have witnessed the spectacle that is a Carnival parade, and below are pictured some examples of the wild colors that you can experience walking down the streets during this exciting time.

“Zulu” from A Mardi Gras Dictionary by Beverly B. Vidrime

There are the colors of gowns at Krewe balls, glittery masks, headdresses of Mardi Gras Indians, and the many beads and throws that we’ll be collecting over the next few days! Some of the materials in Special Collections display the variety of color that can be found in Carnivals past and present.

“Tiepolo, Le Menuet or Scene de la carnival (detail)” from Mardi Gras: New Orleans by Henri Schindler

“Allison (“Tootie”) Montana, Big Chief, Yellow Pocahontas, 1990″ from Mardi Gras Indians by Michael P. Smith

“Tootie (at right), Darryl Montana (in middle), Marlon Sennette (at left), Chantz Stevenson (Montana’s grandson), 1993″ from Mardi Gras Indians by Michael P. Smith

To view the books mentioned in this post, and other books about the history of Mardi Gras in New Orleans, visit Special Collections and Archives on the 3rd Floor of the Monroe Library.

Blog post by Maureen Kelly, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Spotlight on Social Justice: Exhibit

Special Collections & Archives is currently displaying selections from some of our newer social justice collections. Through protest documentation and photographs, grassroots activist literature and zine culture, the collections exhibited here exemplify Loyola’s mission of working for a more just world.

The collections on display include The Rosemary Drown Archdiocese of New Orleans and School Integration Collection, The New Orleans Social Justice and Activism Collection, and The K. (Kenneth) Brad Ott Papers.

The exhibit will be on display from February 2- May 29. Special Collections & Archives is open Monday – Thursday from 9am-4pm and Friday 9am-12pm.

The New Orleans Water Cure

Sometimes when browsing the books in our Special Collections & Archives a title just beckons you to pluck it from the shelf.

Today it was a volume entitled New Orleans Water Cure, by Father François Rougé. Written around 1887, this book outlines and explains how to use Bavarian priest Sebastian Kneipp’s, “Water Cure” to treat illnesses.

Sebastian Kneipp

Kneipp’s Water Cure was by no means exclusive to New Orleans, nor was it created here. The “Kneipp Cure” was essentially Kneipp’s take on hydrotherapy combined with naturopathic medicine.

The volume pits Kneipp’s hydrotherapy against the use of medicines to treat illness and outlines the processes involved in seeking and administering the cure.

Here is an excerpt illustrating the anti-medicine stance of the Kneipp Water Cure:

One of the more whimsical seeming requirements (part of Kneipp’s “hardening process”) was walking in the dew barefoot.  This actually became a (somewhat ridiculed) fad in Central Park in New York City, where gentlemen and ladies were seen walking barefoot in the morning dew or winter snow.

Kneipp’s methods (called Kneippism) combine hydrotherapy with diet, exercise, and herbal medicine. He was the most famous nature doctor of his time whose clients included Archduke Franz Ferdinand and Pope Leo XIII.

Franz Ferdinand

Pope Leo XIII

The Kneipp Water Cure located in New Orleans opened to the public on July 11th, 1896  in the area of Flood St. and Levee St. (Peters St. and Flood St.), and was initially run by Father Rougé, the author of book.

Daily Picayune advertisement from July, 31, 1898

Above is an image of the New Orleans Kneipp Water Cure (Cure D’Eau) from around 1905-1910. (Note the large water tower.)

Kneippism still flourishes today with a popular line of Kneipp naturopathic products available as well as locations where you can undergo Kneipp derived therapies.

Please feel free to come to visit the Special Collections & Archives to check out this book in our reading room Monday through Thursday 9:00am to 4:30pm.

#howtoTuesday: Yachting

Today’s #howtoTuesday comes from the Southern Yacht Club–the second oldest yacht club in the United States. Founded in 1849 and re-organized in 1878 after the Civil War and the subsequent Reconstruction, the S.Y.C. published this volume in 1892 to cover the organization’s charter, by-laws, racing rules, and more.

The S.Y.C. clubhouses (the organization is now on its fourth structure) have been located in the West End area of New Orleans on Lake Pontchartrain since 1857. Images of the S.Y.C. from other Louisiana repositories are available in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Panorama from West End from Southern Yacht Club, Louisiana State Museum

Sailboats being prepared for a regatta on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans Louisiana, State Library of Louisiana

Southern Yacht Club on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans Louisiana in the early 1900s, State Library of Louisiana

Far View of Southern Yacht Club 1919-03-16, The Historic New Orleans Collection

For more information on the S.Y.C., visit Special Collections & Archives to view the entire S.Y.C. handbook as well as The sesquicentennial of the Southern Yacht Club of New Orleans, 1849-1999 : 150 years of yachting in the Gulf South.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Backwards Dance: Loyola, 1962

While looking through our University Photographs Collection the other day I came across a series of pictures that are tagged with the phrase “Backwards Dance.”

The images depict co-eds in 1962 dressed in silly costumes and having what looks like a great time.

What is a backwards dance, you might ask? It’s basically a Sadie Hawkins dance: where girls ask boys to the dance, instead of the other way around.

The origin of the name Sadie Hawkins comes from a Li’l Abner comic strip character that decides to challenge all the unmarried men in her small town to a foot race so as to catch a husband.

Being the curious person that I am, I had to look a little further and see if there was an earlier example of this practice. It so happens that in 5th century Ireland, St. Patrick reportedly gratified St. Bridgett’s complaint that men were often too shy to ask women to marry them by sanctioning the right for women to propose to men on Leap Day.

This practice appears fairly antiquated by today’s social mores and it could be argued as either anti-feminist or feminist depending on how you frame it within the long arm of history… but it still looks like they are having a pretty good time in 1962.

And in closing, here is a little musical lagniappe of The Exciters singing “Tell Him” to a bear in a zoo!

Special Collections & Archives are open Monday through Thursday 9:00-4:30 and Friday 9:00-12:00 and are located on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library.

#howtoTuesday: Loyola style

Today’s #howtoTuesday(s) come from the Maroon newspaper, which has been distributing sage advice to our students for 91 years.

First up is how to buy your books from the bookstore:

then, how to succeed in Basketball:

Finally, we have “How to Succeed in College Without Really Trying,” a board game!

***Don’t lose points by not knowing where the library is!

Looking for more lessons from the University Archives? Come see us on the 3rd floor of the library in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.