Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

#ColorOurCollections

This week is #ColorOurCollections, a week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Loyola’s Special Collections & Archives has three coloring books available for you to download and print:

Excerpts from the University Archives

Johann Gottlieb Mann’s Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants

John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Throughout the week, we’ll also be posting new coloring pages related to our Mardi Gras collections!

Above: Loyola University New Orleans graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks, from the University Photographs Collection. Click here to download.

Once you’ve colored your picture(s), share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

Click here for a list of other institutions participating in #ColorOurCollections to find even more coloring options.

Photos of the Danna Center

I digitized about 100 photos from the Department of Student Involvement as my first project as a Special Collections intern. Here is a small sample of some of them.

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This Photo depicts a bar and restaurant that existed when my mom went to Loyola located at the current spot of Satchmo’s.

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This Photograph depicts what the cafeteria in the Danna Center used to look like over 30 years ago.

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This photograph depicts a former dessert shop in the Danna Center.

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This photograph depicts what used to be in the spot of the One Loyola Room right in front of the bookstore.

Blog by Student Intern Benjamin.

Alternative Groundhog Day?

It’s Groundhog Day again, and reports are that Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, predicting six more weeks of winter weather. That is all well and good for our friends up north, but did you know that New Orleans once had it’s own oracle rodent named…Sybil? The February 6, 1981 issue of The Maroon broke it down:

And what would Groundhog Day be without…Groundhog Day? Enjoy!

Thank you New Orleans Opera Board!

Last night, Special Collections & Archives was pleased to host the New Orleans Opera Board for a viewing of our exhibits, LOYNOOA: Loyola University and Opera in New Orleans, and Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

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Thank you to the Opera Board for coming and seeing a small portion of this wonderful collection.

#Feathursday

It’s #feathursday again! These ostriches can be found in the circa 1900 Basil Thompson Childhood Scrapbook in the Louisiana Digital Library.

World Day of the Snowman

It’s not often that we get to celebrate winter with a snowman, but these historic photographs from the University Photographs Collection show us Loyola students doing just that…

Happy snow day?

Gloria’s Top 5 archives picks

The Special Collections and Archives department at Monroe Library is a safe place for history according to literature, correspondence, and documentation. On Loyola’s campus, there are several galleries, and many individual buildings that display art and framed history on the walls in the hallways; but on the third floor of the Monroe Library is a condensed and magical museum of information. If my introduction has not enticed you to explore the archives, maybe my “Top 5 Favorite Collections in the Archives” list will.

5. Germany’s Wild Medicinal PlantsThis collection is digitized, but in order to view the actual book in its entirety, you can request to see it via the in person in Special Collections. It is a collection of antique illustrations of each wildflower and their medicinal properties. The images are beautiful.

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4. The Samway Book Collection – Patrick Samway, S.J. has donated a large portion of his personal book collection to Special Collections & Archives. Made up of almost 3,000 books primarily by Southern writers, I find his particular collection of William Faulkner literature most interesting. On the shelves is at least one of every piece written by William Faulkner; but for most, there made be 6 to even 12 different editions. One title in several languages, print editions, different cover art, etc. For the right kind of person, this is an impressive and fascinating collection of Faulkner literature!

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3. The Marguerite Piazza Papers – A small collection donated by the family of Ms. Piazza, I discovered it while organizing the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit. Ms. Piazza graduated from Loyola in what we called the golden Age of Opera Education. She was one of the first to graduate from the Vocal Performance department in opera studies. However, her life after Loyola was lived among the stars of Hollywood. Known for her talents as a vocalist, dancer, and actress she was stunningly beautiful and very popular. Her personal life was just as interesting. While going through her collection, it’s easy to get lost in her story (previously blogged here).

Piazza aboard American Airlines flight to Memphis after receiving the "Golden Stocking Award" from the hosiery industry for having the most glamorous legs in American, 1956.

2. John Kennedy Toole Manuscript – Yes, this is one of the Toole’s manuscripts – wrapped in a beautiful archive safe box and tied with a brown piece of yarn. There is no definitive “first manuscript” for A Confederacy of Dunces. However, this manuscript was, “donated by Lyn Hill Hayward, a longtime friend of Walker Percy’s, and described by her as the manuscript given Percy by Thelma Toole”.

1. First Edition Copy of Sylvia Plath’s Ariel – Sylvia Plath’s posthumous Ariel was initially published in 1966. This printing is part of the Robert Giroux Collection. Giroux was vice president and partner of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., and his book collection contains many first editions and signed copies of works by 20th century American writers.

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Posted by student worker Gloria S. Cosenza

National Bird Day

To celebrate National Bird Day, this very special #feathursday is brought to you by the majestic Snowy Owl. You can find this beautiful bird and many others in the fully digitized volume John Gould’s 1873 Birds of Great Britain in the Louisiana Digital Library.

New Orleans Directory ads, 1852

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Here’s a little holiday treat for lovers of New Orleans history and typography. I’ve been making enclosures to preserve our collection of New Orleans Directories, and have enjoyed that these books are all interspersed with type-set ads of many colors. You can glean much about the culture of the time period from these ads. (i.e. the note about a hospital for slaves at the bottom the first ad depicted.) This particular book, Cohen’s New Orleans and Lafayette Directory, 1852, was printed in the office of the Delta Daily newspaper. As you can see, letterpress printers in the nineteenth century would often show off the type in their shops by using every single typeface available when setting ads and title pages. Fun fact: the engraved image facing the title page depicts the first mayor of New Orleans, A.D. Crossman (1846-1854).

On This Day in 1884, Cotton Centennial

The World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-85

December 16, 1884 marked the opening day of The World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition. The Cotton Planter’s Association chose to commemorate the first recorded shipment of cotton from the United States to England, which happened in 1784, at the World’s Fair that year in New Orleans.

Special Collections & Archives has several books commemorating the Exposition. The World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, 1884-85 describes the opening ceremony and exhibits in the fair. Each state in the U.S. (of which there were 38 at the time), the 7 territories (Arizona, Dakota, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Washington, Wyoming), and 17 foreign nations (of which the Mexico exhibit was particularly lauded) had its own exhibit, and there were also dedicated  exhibits on the government, education, women, people of color, the railway, horticulture, art, and livestock.

Catalogue of the art collection describes the art on display at the exhibition and includes prices.

Finally, Map of the city of New Orleans showing location of exposition grounds and all approaches thereto by land & water shows the exhibition’s locations around the city as well as drawings of some of the exhibition buildings. Special Collections & Archives’ copies are very fragile, but the map is digitized and available online in David Rumsey’s Map Collection, Harvard University’s Digital Maps Collection, the University of Milwaukee’s American Geographical Society Library – Maps Collection, and Wikimedia Commons (shown below). Most of the exhibition took place in what is now Audubon Park.

There are many more items related to the Cotton Centennial in the Louisiana Digital Library, including LSU’s  New Orleans Centennial Exposition Stereoscopic Views collection.

A Louisiana "Swamp Angel," G. & S. Building, from New Orleans Centennial Exposition Stereoscopic Views, LOUISiana Digital Library, Baton Rouge, La.

You can view the three books detailed above in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives, Monroe Library, Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm.