Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

#howtoTuesdays: Play piano

Today’s #howtoTuesday is a collection of 19th century piano music. The first section of the book is J. B. Cramer’s Instructions for the Piano Forte. The German Johann Baptist Cramer was born in Mannheim, Germany but spent most of his life in London, and was described as “one of the father of the church of pianoforte playing”  by pianist Edward Dannreuther. Beethoven was a fan of Cramer’s piano studies (short pieces for improving technical ability) and selected some of them for practice by his nephew, so if you decide to learn how to tickle the ivories from this volume, you’ll be in good company.

This particular volume was bound with several 19th century popular piano pieces which probably fall outside of the beginner’s abilities.

You can visit Instructions for the Piano Forte in person in Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Vintage summer

It’s finally summer break for Loyola students. Enjoy these photos of Loyolians of the past taking advantage of the warm weather.

"Children's Art Classes - Cynthia Clark - teacher 1973 (summer)"

"Children's Art Classes - Summer 1973."

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesdays: 19th C. Engineer

Ever wondered how to be a nineteenth century engineer? We have the book for you!

The operative mechanic and British machinist; being a practical display of the manufactories and mechanical arts of the United Kingdom was published in America in 1826 by Cary and Lea of Philadelphia.

Title

Two volumes bound as one book, the Operative Mechanic instructs one on all manner of engineering.

contents

Including wind mill construction:
windmills

As well as the basics of harnessing “Animal Strength”:

animal

Feel free to come and see The Operative Mechanic for yourself in Special Collections and Archives!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy Nurses Day

Today is National Nurses Day. To celebrate, here are some images of nursing students from Loyola’s history.

Wondering when these photos were taken, or who’s in them? So are we! Leave a comment to help us identify them.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Finals? Beware of “reflex nightmare!”

The front page of the The Maroon from May 5, 1935, is full of busy end-of-the-school-year news. The final student dance had been scheduled, and the senior party hosted by alumni had been set. But what really caught our attention can be found at the bottom of the page: “Dental Student Victim of Unique Reflex Nightmare.”

As the article explains, Eddie Driscoll, a junior in Loyola’s Dental School, was so nervous about his upcoming pathology exam that he awoke from a dream and was unable to move. (Perhaps a case of what is now called “Sleep Paralysis”?) If such a panic should strike you, take comfort in the fact that, as Eddie explained, “this only happens to brilliant people.”

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesdays: Meditate

With finals right around the corner, some of you might be looking for a way to increase your focus and spiritual well-being. Enter the Dutch Jesuit Rev. Joannes Philippus Roothaan’s How to Meditate. The volume was originally published in Latin in 1840; the version presented here was translated into English by Louis J. Puhl in 1945.

Meditation here refers not to the “New Age” definition of the word but to the most commonly used method of prayer from St. Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises, one of the “great classics of Christian spirituality” (LEWIS, J. “Spiritual Exercises.” New Catholic Encyclopedia).

This book and others by Roothaan are available in Special Collections & Archives and the Jesuit Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

To the Class of 2014

In a few weeks the Class of 2014 will be graduating. They will take their lasts examinations, spend their last sleepless nights in Monroe Library, and pack their bags for the last time. Each chose to spend the past 4 years at Loyola for their own personal reasons and I assume they are all pleased with this choice. More importantly, they came to New Orleans to spend these 4 years. A unique city unlike any other. Some seniors will remissness on countless walks in Audubon Park, Mardi Gras, crawfish and more. For others, their memories of Loyola and New Orleans may be much simpler. At this time, you may also be scared of the unknown life that is soon to unfold after college.  Class of 2014, I encourage you to read this article from the 1990 Maroon. In this article a senior discusses his experience at Loyola University New Orleans. He reflects on the ups and downs and the simple things about the city that he loves so much. Additionally, he discusses his fear of the future. Seek comfort in this article and know that all of the feelings you are having right now are perfectly natural. Good Luck and Congratulations!

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesdays: Cuisine De l’Amour

“We may live without friends; we may live without books; But civilized man cannot live without cooks.” Owen Meredith.

So begins Cuisine De l’Amour, or the Aphrodisiac Culinary Manual. This 1942 cookbook and guide was compiled by Charles F. Heartman, a German émigré and book collector. Heartman and his family moved to New orleans in 1935  where he founded The Pelican Galleries in the French Quarter. More information about Heartman is available from USM where the Heartman Papers are held.

While oysters are often touted for their aphrodisiac qualities, Cuisine also suggests using eggs, vegetables, and fish to entice the object of your desire.

The manual includes recipes as well as historical anecdotes and general advice.

If you’re looking for Henry IV’s “prowesses in duels of love,” Aphrodisiac Culinary Manual is available for viewing in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Titanic Anniversary

One hundred and two years ago today, April 10, the RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England on a voyage to New York City. Four days into the journey, on April 14, 1912, the ship hit an iceberg off of Newfoundland and sank. Over 1,500 people lost their lives in one of the greatest disasters of the modern age. That same year Story of the Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic : the Ocean’s Greatest Disaster was published.

Featuring photographs, illustrations, and accounts of survivors, the book is an example of how the sinking of the great ship was regarded in its own time.

You can view Story of the Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic : the Ocean’s Greatest Disaster in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Walker Percy Papers

Special Collections & Archives is pleased to announce that the Walker Percy Papers are now available. Walker Percy was born on May 28, 1916 in Birmingham, Alabama. His first novel, The Moviegoer (1961), won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1962. Percy continued to publish fiction and nonfiction covering subjects such as philosophy, semiotics, religion, science and life in the South.

This collection originated from Walker Percy’s office at his home in Covington and was donated by his daughter after the death of his wife, Mrs. Mary “Bunt” Percy. Handwritten notes, typescripts with marginalia, drafts of speeches and lectures, and correspondence and photocopies of correspondence make up the majority of the collection. There are a number of collected articles and academic journals that contain pieces written about Percy as well as unpublished academic papers and theses about him and his writing. The range of the material in the collection focuses mainly on the latter half of Percy’s life.

Other materials in Special Collections & Archives relating to Percy include the Percy-Walsh Correspondence, the Percy-Romagosa Collection, the Walker Percy and Charles Suhor Letters, and the Patrick Samway, S.J. Papers. UNC Chapel Hill also has Walker Percy papers.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.