Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Happy Halloween!

To celebrate, check out a “Haunting Note” (above) from the October 30, 1981 issue of The Maroon.

Each year, the Loyola University New Orleans Maroon features fun, spook-tacular articles surrounding Halloween on campus and in the Crescent City.

Another holiday remembered by the Loyola Maroon is All Saints’ Day.

This article from the October 28, 1994 Maroon explains why All Saints’ Day is so important and reminds students to remember the Holiday amidst all of the Halloween celebrations.

In 2001, the Maroon published an article on the lighter side of Halloween and All Saints’ Day.

However you plan to spend your Halloween and All Saints’ Day,

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives would like to wish you a Happy Halloween!

Posted by student worker Samantha

Coffin, Plank, Cramps: Printing in the 19th Century

Coffin, Plank, Cramps; Printers' Grammar Brooke's Press, Printers' Grammar
Ornaments02, Printers' Grammar Spit and Wheel, Printers' Grammar
Gallows and Sockets, Printers' Grammar
Specimen, Printers' Grammar

Enjoy this sampling of “the coffin, plank, and cramps” as well as other somewhat creepily-named parts of a 19th century platen printing press in honor of #pagefrights month. These engravings (and many more) depicting typography specimen, diagrams of type cases, ornaments, and more are located in The Printers’ Grammar, printed in London by C. Stower, 1808. Come view the book in person in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library!

I leave you now with the book’s curious epigraph:

Aided by thee – O Art sublime! our race

Spurns the opposing bonds of time and space,

With Fame’s swift flight to hold an equal course,

And taste the stream from Reason’s purest source;

Vice and her hydra sons, thy powers can bind,

And cast in Virtue’s mould the plastic mind.

-The Press, John M’Creery, 1803

Night in New Orleans

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Night in New Orleans (Rice-Mitchell Pub., Co., 1911)

Call no.: F379.N54 R5x

This recent acquisition by Special Collections & Archives features striking night scenes of downtown New Orleans in the early 20th Century. The black and white photomechanical reproductions of photographs feature aerial views of iconic streets and businesses near and around the French Quarter, all illuminated by windows, streetcars, and beautiful electric signs.

#PageFrights

Today’s #pagefrights is this ferocious looking wolf (or is it a werewolf!?) from the 1949 Wolf yearbook.

#PageFrights is a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

#PageFrights

Today’s #PageFrights comes from the New Orleans Opera Association Archives. Pictured below is a program cover for a 1975 production of Giacomo Meyerbeer’s Les Huguenots.

Les Huguenots program cover

For more like this, come to the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives and view our exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

#PageFrights is a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

Jefferson Parish LWV Collection

With the U.S. Presidential Election coming up in under a month, it’s only fitting that the League of Women Voters of Jefferson Parish collection is currently being processed in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

The collection features national and local pamphlets and publications, information on causes important to the League of Women Voters (nationally and locally), and much more.

One of the pamphlets from the Jefferson Parish branch of the Leave of Women Voters, “Who’s Who in Government”, lists members of the National Government, State Government, and Local Government, along with ways to contact each member. This photo is from the Summer 1997 mailing.

The League of Women Voters provided a pamphlet for teachers and students on how to actively watch and what to take note of in a Presidential Debate. With the third, and final, debate coming up next Wednesday, October 19th, this pamphlet might be helpful in understanding the importance and purpose of the debate.

Posted by student worker Samantha.

#AskAnArchivist recap

Thank you to all who participated in last week’s event, #AskAnArchivist Day! A recap of Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives contribution to #AskAnArchivist Day is available here.

If you missed #AskAnArchivist Day, never fear! At Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, every day is #AskAnArchivist Day. If you have questions or concerns, we welcome you to contact our staff or visit the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

This digitized photograph and thousands like it belong to the Loyola University New Orleans Photographs Collection and are available to view online here.

Collection Spotlight: John P. Clark Papers

The John P. Clark Papers is a fascinating collection consisting primarily of correspondence and publications. These materials include correspondence with political thinkers and book publishers, independently published political pamphlets and zines, and serial periodicals such as “Our Generation”. The collection also contains a small number of flyers, microfilm reels, and reel-to-reel audio recordings.

While searching for a selection that is representative of the collection, we came across some correspondence between John Clark and friend David Koven stretching over 25 years and found Koven to be a VERY interesting subject. Following the links embedded in Koven’s brief bio below to gather some context.

Koven was “born in Brownsville, Brooklyn, USA 1918; railroad worker, sailor and electrician; painter and photographer; in his youth a member of the Young Communist League; broke with communism and became a pacifist in 1936; turned to anarchism during the Spanish Civil War, when he got involved with the anarchist Vanguard Group; with Audrey Goodfriend one of the founders of Why? (1942-1947), continued as Resistance (1947-1954); moved to San Francisco in the late 1940s, where he became active in Kenneth Rexroth’s anarchist group; editor of The Needle in 1956; in 1958 with Audrey Goodfriend and three other families cofounder of the libertarian Walden School in Berkeley which still exists; one of the founders of and contributors to Pacific Radio Station and one of the most active members of the Vietnam Day Committee” (David Koven Papers, Finding Aid Biographical Note, International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam).

Here’s a glimpse into Box 2, Folder 12, of Collection 57.

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And as an added bonus a sneak-peek at an intro to a jambalaya recipe Koven gathered while visiting Clark and Louisana in the 1980′s… but you’ll have to come visit us to get the full recipe and check out all the other fascinating correspondence in Collection 57.

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Win a NOOA Student Pass!

Win a college student pass for the New Orleans Opera’s 2016/2017 Season

A Seek and Find Questionnaire & Giveaway to support

the Encore! Encore! Bravi! Exhibit Introducing the New Orleans Opera Association Archives

Print this post out to enter or get an answer sheet in Special Collections & Archives.

  1. Answer all 6 questions correctly.
  2. Fold & Place your answer sheet in the designated box in Special Collections & Archives.
  3. Wait until October 5. We will call/email you if you’re a winner!

Though you’re already a winner, anyway…

The Special Collections and Archives Department is located on the third floor of the Monroe Library. Start your search inside the Introduction Case near the third floor elevator. Continue to the Display Window. From there, make your way inside the Booth-Bricker Reading Room and enjoy scanning each of the remaining three cases for more answers.

There is one question for each case, one question from the display window timeline, and one question from the exhibit title poster. Don’t hesitate to ask our staff for assistance! Good luck! And happy hunting!

Questions:

  1. How long is the exhibit “on view”?
  2. There are 7 programs on display in the introduction case. List the titles of three operas from those programs.
  3. On the timeline poster in the Window Display above the introductory case – what notorious soprano had a brief nude scene in the 1973 production of Thais?
  4. From the stage design case – give the name and year of at least one of the set design sketches or photographs in the case.
  5. From the Faust cue sheet found in the supporting roles case – in Scene 2 (The Kermesse) what is the FIRST light cue?
  6. In the photos of “Performance for Students” May 1979 – one of the students may have fallen asleep… True or false?

Letterpress in the Archives: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana” 1916

CitizensBank_spread

There is no reason to doubt that it was the Citizens’ Bank that gave the name “Dixie” to the South. The origin of that word has never been positively determined, but the tradition that gives the credit to the Citizens’ Bank is certainly stronger than any of the other claims advanced. When the country was flooded with wild-cat money and counterfeiting was so common as to cast suspicion on nearly every species of paper money, the notes of this bank commanded respect throughout the great valley, and, in fact, everywhere in the country, and its ten-dollar notes were the standard of value. These notes in ante-bellum days were printed in the French language, and instead of bearing the numeral in English, they bore the French word “dix.” It became common when one was passing down the great river to trade at the Southern metropolis for him to say that he was going South to acquire some dixes. Thus it happened that the lower stretches of the river became known as the land of the dixies, or “Dixie land.”

“Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana”, New Orleans, 1916, p. 11

As the new project assistant in Special Collections & Archives here at Loyola, I have thoroughly enjoyed perusing the stacks as I better acquaint myself with the collection. Since my academic background is in printmaking and book arts, I naturally gravitate towards the rare books on our shelves, and I am continuously fascinated by the bindings and material qualities of these old books. Today I would like to share with you this small letterpress-printed pamphlet: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana,” New Orleans, 1916.

A modest book at first glance, “Citizens’ Bank..” is a lovely example of early twentieth century letterpress-printing. Although there is no press information on the title page of this pamphlet, there are clues in the tactile quality of the book that reveal how it was printed and what materials were used. It is sewn with a silky cord, and a knot tied on the spine of the book allows the pamphlet to close flat.  It is composed of a high-quality mould-made paper, which is evident in the paper’s strong, visible fibers and deckled edge, as well as watermarks that are visible when certain pages are held up to bright light. If you were to lightly brush your finger along the text of this book, you’d notice a texture, an imprint, which occurs because of the amount of pressure applied in the printing process. At close inspection you’d see that some of the text is over-inked in places, which creates a small puddle around individual letters. I could go on and on about the letterpress process, but instead I’ll refer you to this resource if you’d like to learn more.

This book was letterpress printed on high quality paper because its materials were likely intended to reflect the history of a wealthy institution: the Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana. Its brief 31 pages outline the history of the bank, and the book serves as a well-crafted advertisement for the financial institution. You can view more images of this book (and many more) on our tumblr, or come in for a visit on the third floor of Monroe Library!