Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Bateman Team 1997-

Loyola’s Bateman Team, a group of public relations students from the School of Mass Communication, has just received yet another first place win in the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA)’s Bateman Case Study Competition. Loyola’s team has consistently placed in the top 3 for the past 15 years. Below are articles from the Maroon covering some of the team’s illustrious history.

1997 Maroon

2000 Maroon

2003 Maroon

2005 Maroon

2010 Maroon

2012 Maroon

Bonus: Bateman bocce ball

2003 Wolf Yearbook

Congratulations to the team!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Bulldozing the Old Library and Bulldozing the Mind

Below is an interesting article from the 2001 Maroon about bulldozing the entire Loyola campus, hypothetically of course. As the old library is descontructed, this article made quite an impression. Smith argues that the physical buildings that make up Loyola University of New Orleans are simply structures. He asserts that, even without these buildings, Loyola can still be a institution, so long as there are still students who have a strong desire to learn, expand the mind, and “seek the truth” and faculty members willing to further educate. Most importantly, the Loyola community should consider “mental bulldozing” in that students and faulty should remember that the purpose of this institution is not limited within the walls of the buildings. Thus, the community can exclude any notions  that our institution would not exist if there was no physical structure. These structures simply supplement our academic endevors. If any of you are not pleased with the construction that is occuring around campus, because you believe it is effecting your academic abilities in some way (ie maybe you are late to class because the construction changed your usual path to class), remember that the renovations and deconstruction happening on campus are intended to supplement your academic experience, not to limit it.

Maroon 2001

#howtotuesday: Be Green

It’s a green week at Loyola. Wednesday, April 22 is the university’s Earth Day celebration. And National Arbor Day is celebrated annually on the last Friday of April, so it falls on April 24 this year. The holiday was founded by J. Sterling Morton in 1872 with the express intention of encouraging individuals and groups to plant trees. In 1889, McDonough No. 23 was the first Louisiana school to celebrate Arbor Day. 16 years late, Loyola College followed suit.

According to the March 9, 1905 Times-Picayune, each of the twenty-eight students enrolled in the college were asked to plant a young live oak that afternoon to help provide shade across the fledgling campus. The program included songs and recitations and the Rev. Albert Biever, S.J., first president of the college and later of Loyola University, gave an address. An article in the February 13, 1905 Times-Picayune reported that the trees were brought from St. Charles College in Grand Coteau.

Loyola College opened in 1904 and included both preparatory and college students. In 1911, the New Orleans Jesuits reorganized their educational institutions, and the Loyola University we know today was established in 1912.

Loyola College students, 1906-1907

Loyola’s landscape has continued changing and growing. Most recently, the university announced that the demolished Old Library would be transformed into green space.

Thomas Hall as seen from St. Charles Ave.

Special Collections & Archives preserves a number of collections related to environmental justice in Louisiana, including the John P. Clark Papers, the Gulf Restoration Network Archives, and the Ecology Center of Louisiana Papers.

How do you plan to take Loyola’s history and mission as inspiration to be a little more green this week?

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Loyola

The Center for the Study of New Orleans at Loyola will be hosting a panel discussion, “Katrina: Before, During, and After”, on Thursday, April 16 at 7pm in Nunemaker Auditorium. This panel includes meteorologists, authors, photographers, and geographers who will share their perspectives of the storm. Wondering how Hurricane Katrina impacted the Loyola community? Below are articles from the 2006 Maroon which describe the effect that Hurricane Katrina had financially and emotionally on Loyola and its faculty and students. These articles also offer perspectives of the storm from Loyola faculty, students, and parents. Most importantly, these articles highlight the positive outlook that the Loyola community had about the future of New Orleans and ways in which the Loyola community helped to rebuild the city.

Maroon 2006

Maroon 2006

Maroon 2006

Maroon 2006

For more information about Hurricane Katrina, visit Special Collections and Archives on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library:

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Old photos of the old library

As Loyola’s old library comes down, let’s take a look at some photos of the building in its heyday.

First, here it is under construction. Construction of the new library building began in 1947 and completed in 1950. It was dedicated to students and alumni killed in WWII.

…and here it is completed.

Main Library dedication, 1950

United States Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps

United States Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps

Enjoying the front steps:

Inside the Main Library:

Do you have memories of the Main Library? Leave them in the comments below!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Spring and Summer Gardens

Summer is quickly approaching! As the semester winds down, you might be able to get outside and enjoy some of the beautiful weather that we’ve been having in New Orleans.

Author Claire Lawson-Hall and illustrator Muriel Mallows reflect on the seasons in their books A Winter Garden, An Autumn Garden, A Spring Garden, and A Summer Garden. The two women have collaborated on a variety of projects. The Garden series includes journal entries written by Lawson-Hall that report on the meteorological and environmental happenings in her British garden.

In Special Collections and Archives, we have a set of the Garden series that has been beautifully bound. They are part of the Rosalee McReynolds Collection, which is named after the Monroe Library’s first Special Collections librarian and contains a number of books that are true works of art. Pictured below are A Spring Garden and A Summer Garden.

Cover, A Spring Garden

Obviously, this is much more than a book. It has progressed into a work of art.

Excerpt from A Spring Garden

Cover, A Summer Garden

The back of A Summer Garden

Text and illustrations, A Summer Garden

These books, along with An Autumn Garden, A Winter Garden, and the rest of the Rosalee McReynolds Collection can be viewed in Special Collections and Archives, 3rd floor, Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

The Loujon Press

Staples of the New Orleans arts scene, Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb and Jon Webb started the Loujon Press in 1960 and published their first literary magazine, The Outsider, the following year. The husband and wife team worked hard to establish their press. Gypsy Lou sold paintings on pirate’s alley during the day and set pages of type at night while Jon recruited literary talent and marketed subscriptions. The publication soon gained notoriety for the quality of the hand-printed editions and its larger runs of up to 3,100, which guaranteed a wider audience. Though sold at only one or two dollars a copy, the little magazine became an important part of the beat movement, publishing poetry by poetry by Charles Bukowski and Allen Ginsberg among many others.

The Outsider volume 1, number 1, fall 1961, cover with a photo of Gypsy Lou

The Outsider, volume 1, number 1, fall 1961, page 67, poem by LeRoi Jones (later known as Amiri Baraka)

The Outsider, volume 1, number 1, fall 1961, back cover with photos of featured poets

The Outsider, volume 1, number 2, summer 1962, cover with photos of Gypsy Lou, Willie Humphrey (top) and Dee Dee Pierce (left)

The Outsider, volume 1, number 2, summer 1962, title page with image of Loujon Press location on Royal Street

The Outsider, volume 1, number 2, summer 1962, page 24 and 25 with a poem by Ray Bremser and drawing by Ben Tibbs

The Outsider, Volume 1, Number 3, Spring 1963, cover with photo of Charles Bukowksi

The Outsider, Volume 1, Number 3, Spring 1963, back cover with photo of a second line; The second and third volume include “jazz documentary” chapters that detail the history of jazz in new orleans and the careers of many of the musicians of that era.

With the funding of a New Orleans patron, the Loujon Press also published two books of Bukowski’s poetry. Hand-printed in an edition of 777, the first book, It catches my heart in its hands, features 65 poems and several drawings by Bukowksi. A cult-hero and prolific author, Bukowksi became known for his direct language and focus on the downtrodden in American society.

Charles Bukowksi, It catches my heart in its hands, 1963, cover

Charles Bukowksi, It catches my heart in its hands, 1963, page 14 and 15

The publisher’s note paints a picture of the hardships Jon and Gypsy Lou endured to complete projects as well as their intense passion for their work.

Charles Bukowksi, It catches my heart in its hands, 1963, publisher’s note (photo of Bukowksi to the left on back cover)

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Loup Garou 1999

Tommorow,  Loyola hosts Wale for the traditional spring concert series, Loup Garou! Back in 1999, Loyola hosted its 2nd Loup Garou with a performance by RUN DMC. The 1999 Loup Garou was hosted on October 24th in the Palm Court  and student tickets were $7. Below is an essay written by a Loyola student, Becky Dickinson, who was on the committee for the concert. Dickinson describes how much fun planning the concert was. Additionally,  she describes the amazing opportunity she had to meet RUN DMC and interview them. Most importantly, she notes the emphasis RUN DMC placed on the importance of educating people on the art of rap in hopes that society will recognize it as a respectable music form. Moreover, RUN DMC argues that rap music can have a positive influence on society. Maybe some of you will be lucky enough to meet Wale at the concert tomorrow, at 8pm, and disscuss the importance of rap music! You never know!

RUN DMC

RUN DMC

Click image to open larger view

RUN DMC

Click image to open larger view

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier was a Fireside poet, American Quaker, and abolitionist. His poetic work mainly focuses on religion and the picturesque region of Essex County, Massachusetts. In the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Collection, part of Loyola’s Special Collections and Archives, there is a rather interesting copy of Whittier’s collected works. The collection, which focuses on finely bound and illustrated books, contains a number of works that have the same special features as this example.

Portrait of Whittier, from The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier

Upon looking at the book, you can first notice the beautiful gilded cover and binding, as well as the marbled endpapers.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the binding, however, is what is called “fore-edge painting.” Notice the gilded edges of the book:

Now, when the book is opened so that the pages can stretch, we can see a picture previously hidden by the gilding!

Whittier’s Home in Amesbury, MA; fore-edge painting from The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier.

Whittier’s Home, 86 Friend Street, Amesbury, MA. Photograph from Wikipedia.

More examples of this technique can be found in many of the books in the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Collection, or online here: http://twistedsifter.com/2013/09/hidden-artworks-on-the-edges-of-books/

Whittier’s poem “Our River” is about the Merrimac River that flows through his hometown of Amesbury, MA. This poem, along with all of Whittier’s other published work, can be found in The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier as part of the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Collection in Special Collections and Archives, 3rd Floor, Monroe Library.

“Our River” by John Greenleaf Whittier, from The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier.

For more information about Whittier, visit the Whittier Museum’s page here: http://whittierhome.org/

This book, and others like it, can be viewed in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Lush Landscapes of Ireland and a Ballad for St. Patrick

St. Patrick’s day parades are right around the corner! To get you in the Irish spirit here are some images from The Scenery and Antiquities of Ireland. Written in 1840, the two-volume work follows the travels of J. Stirling Coyne (1803–1868), a British playwright and journalist. The engravings after drawings by W.H. Bartlett illustrate a variety of attractions in Ireland from cityscapes to wooded glens to castle ruins.

“Kilkee, (County Clare)”

Coyne writes, “Kilkee is a beautiful watering-place, situated on a little creek, which runs in off Malbay. It has risen considerably in importance within the last few years, and is now the most fashionable resort for bathers on the whole line of this romantic coast.”

“Youghal Abbey (The Residence of Sir Walter Raleigh)”

“Cove of Malbay”

“Natural Bridges Near Kilkee”

Coyne artfully describes the formation of the bridges: “…the ceaseless action of the Atlantic waves have worn away, and scooped the stratified cliffs into Natural Bridges, caverns, and chasms, so as to give the shores here the appearance of stupendous ruins, or the fragments of a half-formed world thrown into the wildest confusion by the hand of nature.”

“Turk Cascade (Near Killarney)”

In addition to outlining the history and industry of many locations, Coyne also describes his experience in detail, inserting observations and advice to the locals at times: “A small gate on the left of the road was opened by a person of no peculiarity except outside pockets in the arm-pits of his coat, and following him along the borders of a brook, through young plantations of fir and larch, I came presently in sight of the fall, – a sheet of white foam falling, as well as I could judge forty or fifty feet, but so inlaid in the chasm through which it descends as to have very much the advantage of most falls of equal height. After breaking on the rocks the steam resumes its rapid course through the ravine, and soon empties into the lake. Mr. Herbert’s plantations on the sides and edges of the ravine serve to give the Turk Cascade an American wildness, which struck me very agreeably. I wish he would also give it a prettier name.”

“Carrigogunnell Castle (Near Limerick)”

Coyne explains that the castle began as a house for knights templar and then in 1691 sheltered troops after the battle of Aughrim, part of the bloody conflict between Jacobites and the forces of William III. He notes that the Dean of Limerick received one hundred and sixty pounds to blow up the castle, leaving nothing but “piles of venerable remains.”

A nearby volume, Lewis’s Atlas contains a large fold-out map of Ireland, in addition to smaller maps of each county. Interestingly, the atlases show measurements in Irish miles, which were in use until about 1856 and measured 2,048 meters instead of the official 1,609.

In case you were wondering about the origins of St. Patrick, here is a song version from The Ballads of Ireland by Edward Hayes:

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.