Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Louisiana Purchase in Cartoon Form

Today is the 210th anniversary of the formal ceremony to transfer ownership of the Louisiana territory from France to the United States. As part of the Louisiana Purchase Sesquicentennial celebration, New Orleans Item cartoonist John Churchill Chase created Louisiana purchase: an american story told in that most american forms of expression… the comic strip in 1953. Originally syndicated across the country, the comic was later reprinted in 1954.

One of Special Collections & Archives’ (SC&A) copies contains a letter from Chase to Father Patrick Donnelly, S.J., President of Loyola from 1952 to 1961 , thanking him for suggesting that the comic be compiled in book form.

John Churchill Chase also authored 40 cartoons in wartime (available in SC&A) and Frenchmen, Desire, Good Children, and other streets of New Orleans, in words and pictures (one copy in SC&A and one in the circulating stacks).

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Steinbeck and East of Eden

Google’s Doodle today commemorates the birthday of Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winning writer John Steinbeck (1902-1968).

(Images above are static, but if you go to Google you can see the interactive graphic).

Special Collections & Archives has a signed first edition of Steinbeck’s East of Eden, considered by the author to be his greatest work. Steinbeck said about Eden, “It has everything in it I have been able to learn about my craft or profession in all these years.”

This book is part of Special Collections & Archives’ Robert Giroux Collection of 20th century American writers.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

The Soldier in Our Civil War

Are you a student of history? Are you an artist? Perhaps you’re a little of both? Then come on up to the Monroe Library Special Collections and Archives department to view a copy of The Soldier in Our Civil War: A Pictorial History of the Conflict, 1861-1865.

Each of the two volumes in this over-sized set measures 12″ x 17″ and is filled with intricate, hand-drawn illustrations.

Almost every major aspect of the four year War Between the States is depicted in these volumes.

Including:

The key players….

Home front politics….

Weaponry….

And of course, battle scenes….

The book is filled with hundreds of illustrations. Come see it today in the Special Collections & Archives!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Letters from Iceland

On what would have been his 107th birthday, Special Collections & Archives presents W.H. Auden’s Letters From Iceland.

Part letter, part travel book, and part poetry collection, Letters commemorates three months Auden and co-author Louis MacNeice spent in Iceland in 1936.

The book includes travel advice such as what to drink:

The beer is weak and nasty, and the lemonade unspeakable

and how to get around:

There are excellent bus services to all parts of the Island…Where there are no official buses, there are often milk-cars which will take you very slowly but cheaply. Those who are car-sick will have, I’m afraid, a rough time. (The drivers are excellent.)

Trivia is provided:

THE LONGEST WORD IN ICELANDIC
Haestarjettarmalaflutunesmanskifstofustulkonutidyralykill–a latch-key belonging to a girl working in the office of a barrister.

Much of the book is in verse:

The reason for hereness seems beyond conjecture,
There are no trees or trains or architecture,
Fruits and greens are insufficient for health
And culture is limited by lack of wealth.
The tourist sights have nothing like Stonehenge,
The literature is all about revenge.
And yet I like it if only because this nation
Enjoys a scarcity of population…

and both photos and graphs are used as illustrations.

This book is part of Special Collections & Archives’ Robert Giroux Collection of 20th century American writers.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Goofy Photos from the Past

As part of an ongoing project to catalog, preserve, and digitize Loyola University’s vast collection of University Photographs, the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives staff often come across wacky and unexplainable images. This is especially true of a series of basketball photos taken in the 1950s & 1960s. Do you have any idea what’s going on in these photographs?

I'm not sure what this student did to be punished so severely....

Is there something really special about that basketball?

Synchronized basketball dunking?

This is a series of images featuring Wolf Pack Hall of Famer Eddie Galvin….in a top hat and cape?

He looks pretty serious about this.

Not sure what he's going for here....

Ball = wand maybe?

Oh my gosh! That looks like real magic!

To view more of the University Photograph collection, please visit our site on the Louisiana Digital Library!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Vintage Sweethearts

Happy Valentine’s Day! Though it seems that the holiday frequently gets overshadowed by Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Loyola students have still found a way to celebrate with their beloved every February 14. From 1953-1971, Loyola held a Sweetheart Cotillion in February to honor the Freshmen Sweetheart Court.

1970

1966

1965

1955

More vintage sweethearts and other Loyola history can be found in the Loyola University Maroon collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s #minibookmonday is an 1823 printing from Chiswick Press.

Measuring 13.4cm, the volume includes Robert Blaire’s “The Grave,”  Beilby Porteus’s “Death,” Robert Glynn’s “The day of judgment,”  E. Young’s “The last day,” and Samuel Boyse’s “Deity.”

It’s not the most uplifting work.

Like our last #minibookmonday, however, it does have a secret…

The pages at first glance are gold-edged, but held in the right way one can see a painting of Salisbury Cathedral, an Anglican cathedral built in the early 1200s.

This book is part of the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Collection of finely bound and illustrated books. As always, it can be seen in Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of the library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Law School Centennial

"Derbies of Dignity!" Law School

Loyola’s College of Law begins celebrating its 100th anniversary this month with a number of events celebrating current students and alumni. Established in 1914, the College of Law was initially at Baronne and Common Streets before moving onto the main campus Uptown, where it remained from 1915-1986 when it moved to its current location on Broadway.

Seton Hall

Seton Hall

Graduates from the College of Law include former mayor Maurice “Moon” Landrieu and his son, the current mayor Mitch Landrieu,

Wolf, 1950, page 73

1950 Wolf Yearbook

Xavier University President Norman Francis,

1955 Wolf, Page 136

1955 Wolf Yearbook

former president of the National Organization for Women (NOW) Kim Gandy,

Wolf 1977, page 76

1977 Wolf Yearbook

and many more distinguished law professionals and politicians.

Special Collections & Archives is rich in resources related to the history of the College of Law, including the personal papers of alumna and former professor (and New Orleans’ first female law professor) Janet Mary Riley.

Wolf 1948, page 72

1948 Wolf Yearbook

To see these items and others like them, check out our digital collections or come see us on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

School of Law

School of Law

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s edition of #minibookmonday presents the The Poems of Ossian.

This tiny treasure, measuring 3 X 5 inches, was published in London in 1819.  It retains it’s original ornate binding, and features a fore edge painting of horse-drawn carriage seen below. In it’s time, this was clearly a finely crafted book.

The Poems of Ossian themselves are less clear. Said to have been “translated” by James MacPherson (1736-1796) from ancient Gaelic texts and the oral tradition of the Scottish Highlands, doubts about the authenticity of poems began shortly after their “discovery” and publication. The charge against the veracity of the poems was largely led by Samuel Johnson, and an official inquiry by the Scottish Highland Society in 1805 supported the notion that MacPherson himself was the author.  The controversy did not do much to dampen interest in the poems themselves, as evidenced by the production of the fine volume we feature today. Indeed, the controversy may have made the poems more popular. (Napoleon was said to be a fan of The Poems of Ossian, and to carry copies with him into battle.) Whatever the ethics of Macpherson’s writings, The Poems of Ossian were  without a doubt widely read and influential on the Romantic period of the 19th century.

Bonus video: scholar Thomas M. Curley discusses his book Samuel Johnson, the Ossian Fraud, and the Celtic Revival in Great Britain and Ireland.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Historic French Quarter Photos

Another series in The Collection of Historic New Orleans Miscellany includes some undated photos of the French Quarter, possibly from the turn of the century. As can be common with an artificial collection, we don’t know who these photos came from or what exactly they’re of. If you recognize a person or place, leave a comment below!

More historic French Quarter photos as well as New Orleans ephemera, documents, and maps can be seen in this collection in Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.