Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Library History Resources

In Special Collections & Archives, we have a lot of different materials about the history of Loyola, New Orleans, and the Jesuits, and many years worth of different university publications. However, we also have materials related to the history of the library itself, and many of those items have been digitized!

There are many digitized photographs of students in the old library (all c. 1950-1960):

All of those pictures can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Clicking on one of the photos above will bring you to that collection in the Louisiana Digital Library.

There are also copies of library newsletters from 1983-2009. These newsletters were distributed primarily to students and faculty to highlight some of the resources and new technology in the Monroe library.

You can find these newsletters in the Loyola University Library History Collection. To view items from this collection in the Louisiana Digital Library, click on any of the images above. More digitized materials about the history of the library can be found in  the Maroon newspaper, the Wolf Yearbook, and the Bulletins.

While our digitized collections can be accessed 24/7, you can come visit us in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library, Monday through Friday, from 9am until 4:30pm.

This post was written by student worker Maureen.

Marbled Monday: SC&A joins the Art Department

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For this week’s “Marbled Monday” post, I am sharing something a little different than usual. Last Wednesday, I had the pleasure of visiting professor Bill Kitchen’s bookbinding class in Loyola’s art department. As project assistant in Special Collections & Archives, my background in bookbinding and repair is something I love sharing with students interested in book art. I spent the afternoon teaching art students one of my favorite sewing patterns: the French-web or two-hole link stitch binding. I often use this particular sewing structure when repairing dis-bound books in our stacks. I chose to incorporate handmade paper tapes to add a bit of style to the exposed spines of their books and also allow for hard-cover attachment. The students did a fantastic job, and I had a blast working with them!

ArchivesSpace

ArchiveSpace

ArchivesSpace is an archives management tool that shows where each box of the archives is. I typed in all the possible Ranges, Sections, Shelves, and floors So I could begin inputting where the objects are. I spent mainly early March inputting the locations. I used most of my March and April internship inputting boxes onto its correct ArchivesSpace, Range, Section, Shelf, and Floor. I am still working on it. I spent almost forty internship hours working on this source.

Blog post by Intern Benjamin Schexnayder

Collection Highlight: M. Aguilar sets

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Occasionally I come across a few rare gems in our public stacks that I carefully rescue to be catalogued in Special Collections. Last week, I gathered many multi-volume sets in series of Spanish theater and poetry published by M. Aguilar in the 1940s-50s. What caught my eye was the hint of color on the top edge of one of the books, and when I pulled it from the shelf I gasped at the bright, intricate stencil that looks to have been airbrushed along the textblock’s head, tail and fore-edge. Some have faded over time along the head, but the edges that have not been exposed to light in some time are as bright as ever. The books vary in size and are all cased in soft leather dyed in various colors. Many feature whimsically illustrated end-sheets as you open the cover, and each has a sepia toned portrait of the author facing the book’s title page. A classy and surprising series indeed! You can now access these books in the Reading Room of SC&A, on the third floor of Monroe Library.

Atilla

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This 1969 adaptation of Atilla marked a special occasion in the history of the NOOA, and even internationally.
As the pamphlet explains,

ATTILA, Verdi’s ninth opera, was written in 1846 for the spring season of La Fenice- the Phoenix- in Venice. It was an instantaneous success, due to the already established reputation of its 33-year old composer, and to its patriotic theme. Four years after its premiere ATTILA was enthusiastically received in New York at Niblo’s Garden, with Marini, for whom it was written, in the title role. ATIILA’s popularity was short-lived, however- Verdi’s later works eclipsing it- and it gradually dropped out of repertories. In 1951 Venice presented a concert version of the opera, but it was not until 1962 that the work was staged in Florence. This was followed by an English performance by Sadler’s Wells, and in the past few years revivals have been mounted in Germany, Austria, Italy, Poland and Argentina. The New Orleans Opera’s production is the first in the United States since the middle of the last century.

Not only that, in this pamphlet there is cover art, and the whole script was printed, which is rather new.  It is rather interesting to flip through and see the English version along with the Italian, so maybe you could learn some helpful phrases such as Qual suono?, which means ‘what is with all of the shouting?’.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1969, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.

Mary Ann Kennedy 20th Century Catholic Brochures Collection

This collection of Catholic pamphlets was built by Mary Ann Kennedy of Little Rock, Arkansas over the course of the 20th century. They provide insight into the Catholic view on subjects ranging from dating and homosexuality to Buddhism and “how to be liked by others.” The Special Collections finding aid for this collection states:

“Tracing their roots back to St. Alphonsus Liguori and his creation of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Redemptorists) in 1732, the Liguorian Magazine was founded in 1913 by American Redemptorists as a pastoral companion guide for Catholics. Their mission was to “[convey] a timely pastoral message to Catholics on matters of faith, Christian living, and social justice, in order to continue their conversion to Christ.” Stemming from Liguori, Missouri, Liguori Publications became the largest distributor of Catholic pamphlets of the St. Louis Province, eventually buying out the Jesuit run Queen’s Work pamphlets, their largest competitor.”

The Catholic University of America has a similar collection containing the Queen’s Work pamphlets, which can be accessed here.

Want to learn more about Buddhism? Check out this pamphlet from 1983-

Not sure if that fortune you received was really accurate? This 1939 pamphlet has all the answers-

Need to get your morals in check? Look no further than this 1943 publication-

Want a refresher on your please and thank yous? This 1942 booklet has you covered-

Want to learn more about Catholic teaching this Lent? This pamphlet from 1968 will teach you more about what Pope Francis’ role is in the church-

Feeling a little stressed as the semester starts to wrap up? This pamphlet from 1983 will have you feeling relaxed and refreshed-

Still worried? This pamphlet from the 80′s should help alleviate some of those anxieties-

Did you give up four letter words for Lent? This 1943 pamphlet explains the horrors of cussing-

You can view the pamphlets in the Mary Ann Kennedy 20th Century Catholic Brochures Collection in Special Collections & Archives, 3rd Floor, Monroe Library, Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm. You can also check out the SC&A tumblr page here!

Posted by student worker Maureen.

Happy April Fools’ Day!

It’s April Fool’s Day — a day to make jokes and pull harmless gags.

The Loyola University New Orleans Maroon is no stranger to pulling a joke on its readers. Throughout the years, The Maroon — or should I say, The Moron — has published issues riddled with gag articles.

In 1932, The April Fools’ issue of the Moron is in no short supply of laugh-worthy articles. One that stands out in particular being “University Adds Hop-Scotchers to Sports List” because “It is high time that Loyola entered in the field of major sports…”

The front page headline of the April 1, 1966 Moron reads, “Sicard Named Dean of MEN; Jolly Elated.” The article features quips from Mrs. Mary Sicard and Father Homer Jolly. 

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The 1931 issue of the Moron takes a somewhat darker spin on April Fools. The front page story tells of two professors at Loyola who had been found “shot” and goes into detail on how Scotland Yard was sending over “the redoubtable Sherlock Holmes, ably assisted by his aide-de-camp, the well-known Dr. Watson.”

You can find the 19301933, and 1976 issues of The Moron by clicking the years, or find all the the issues of The Maroon (and The Moron) here!

The Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives wishes you a Happy April Fools’ Day!

Posted by Student Worker Samantha.

On This Day: WWL debuts in 1922

Loyola radio telegraph class at the original WWL station, circa 1920

Today, March 31, marks the 95th anniversary of WWL-Radio’s first broadcast from Loyola’s Marquette Hall. Loyola’s first wireless receiver was setup on campus in 1909 by Fr. Anton (Anthony) Kunkel using a $150 transmitter. Shortly after the University was chartered in 1912, the Wireless Radio School was established for the purposes of training students telegraphy. The school closed at the end of the 1921-1922 academic year just in time for the Physics department faculty and students to apply for a broadcast license . On March 31, 1922, Loyola broadcast its first voice transmissions (a request for fundraising support from Loyola President Fr. Edward Cummings), making Loyola the originator of New Orleans’ first ever radio program broadcast. While the call letters WWL were assigned arbitrarily, Physics Instructor and future head of the station Fr. Orie Leo Abell would use them to refer to “World Wide Loyola.”

WWL-transmitter

WWL transmitter, circa 1932. Image from WWL: AM--FM--TV; the second campus of Loyola University

WWL later made history by influencing the Internal Revenue Code with its request for tax-exempt status.

WWL station in Kenner, LA

In 1938, a new transmitter was built in Kenner, a suburb of New Orleans, near Lake Pontchartrain. While the station partially flooded in the Hurricane of 1947, it remained in use until it was again moved, this time to Estelle, Louisiana, in the mid 1970s.

WWL Station in Kenner, LA

WWL’s history is closely intertwined with that of both New Orleans and Loyola. Loyola eventually sold all of its media holdings in 1989. WWL-AM and WLMG (formerly WWL-FM) were sold for $12.85 million, while WWL-TV was purchased by Rampart Broadcasting , headed by alums J. Michael Early and Phil Johnson, for $102.85 million.

"DON LEWIS (right), crack announcer, interviews COL. BENNETT MOLTER at the army recreation center on Lake Pontchartrain. WWL carries a weekly broadcast from Camp Polk at Leesville, La., featuring soldier-talent of the third armored brigade, as well as other shows by and for the men in service."

Much more info about the history WWL at Loyola is available in a number of publications, including C. Joseph Pusateri’s Enterprise in radio : WWL and the business of broadcasting in America,  WWL: AM–FM–TV; the second campus of Loyola University (also available in the University Archives Vertical File), and Bernard Cook’s Founded on faith : a history of Loyola University New Orleans.

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Advertisement for March 21, 2002 WWL-AM celebration

The Loyola Lady

As Women’s History Month draws to a close, we reflect on the history of women at Loyola University with the 1962 issue of The Loyola Lady, a handbook for women students distributed by the university.

Loyola Lady Cover

You are 35% strong, co-eds. You compose 35% of the enrollment of Loyola University according to the 1961-62 enrollment figures. Today that figure has increased because more and more young ladies are coming to Loyola each year. When Loyola became a university, the Class of 1911 boasted a 32 student membership with one coed, Miss Lurline Wilson of Independence. The '61-'62 enrollment figures showed approximately 3,200 students from 33 states with 25 countries plus U.S. possessions. Today's registration will hoist that figure. A need for a handbook entirely on the feminine side was pointed out by the Dean of Women. This project was begun last year with a booklet entitled "The Wolfette," edited by Mary Ann Vial, Cathy Lund and Kathy Eberle. This year the booklet, "The Loyola Lady," is published with the sincere hope that it will help you to get to know Loyola and to become a part of this great institution of learning by contributing your very best to the excellent spirit of friendliness, cooperation and leadership that exists in the classrooms and on the campus of Loyola University.

Welcome, Loyola Lady. Welcome to the Loyola campus and sincere best wishes that the coming year will be marked with success in your academic, social, and personal life on the university level. To help you to know what is expected of and what is offered to the Loyola lady, we have prepared this handbook for you. Take a few moments of your time to read it carefully in order that you may become better acquainted with your Alma Mater. Rosalie Parrino, Dean of Women. "Takehold on instruction, leave it not, keep it, because it is thy life." Proverbs, Chapter 4, 13. Published by Loyola University, 1600 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana. Editor: Charmaine Currault.

While Loyola Lady is unsurprisingly outdated, it also highlights many of the activities and service activities women students engaged in in the 60s and encourages female students to participate in intramural sports.

For those of you who are would-be marksmen, there's an excellent rifle team which has competed in a number of state-wide tournaments. In the spring, the department is planning to have a swimming team. Needless to say, you do not have to be a great star to participate in these activities. Remember it's the spirit that counts. The Powder Puff Bowl, an annual even, will include a male "Sweetheart Court." Believe me, in this girls' football game, they come up with a few tricks the boys have never seen.

College Togs. Dress properly for every occasion. Clothing should play an important part in the college coeds plans for college. That is why it is necessary for you to realize how important it is to be properly dressed for every occasion. A first impression be a "good impress" if you dress properly. Things to bring to Loyola. 1. Sweaters and skirts (Bulk style popular).  2. Summer cottons (New Orleans weather is warm until November). 3. Loafers, flats and iby league saddles are worn to class 4. Raincoat or trench coat ( We do have our rainy season) 5. Heavy coat for dress purposes, short coat for sports wear or casual dress. 6. Cocktail dresses are used for evening receptions, semi-formals , operas or fraternity rush party dates. 7. Long formals are rarely worn. Semiformals are the vogue. 8. Drip-dry blouses. 9. Accessories: jewelry (small pearl earrings and necklaces are popular--too many rhinestones are not in good taste. Scarfs, gloves, purse (a small book size purse.) 10. Small handkerchief size veils or chapel caps are popular for week day Mass. A basic black, navy, or brown dress is always in good taste . 12. Opera pumps are always fashionable. 13. Bermuda shorts, slim jims, and a bathing suit.

Little Reminders That Help. The Loyola Lady is courteous at all times. Here are a few rules on introductions and such: 1. Young peopl are presented to older people, a man is presented to a woman, and a less important person is pre-sented to a more important one.  2. A student should introduce herself to faculty members or to guests of the University at any social function . 3. All invitations must be answered promptly. In replying always use plain stationery and black or blue-black ink. In a formal reply, use the third person, making no abbreviations, and writing out all numbers. This should be in the same form as the invitation. Remember that no reply is necessary when the name of a person to whom to send the reply is not given. 4. It is the hostess' privilege and duty to greet the chaperones, introduce them to one another, the students, and served to the chaperones before others are served.

Our University Archives contain images of female Wolfpack students engaging in a number of the activities detailed in The Loyola Lady including rifle practice, the Powder Puff game, attending mass, and hosting social functions.

Target practice

Target shooting team

Churchgoers receiving communion at the Mass of the Holy Ghost

Student in freshman beanie at Baccalaureate Mass

Students at a Dance, 1953

Women students eating

Women students in dorm

Women students cooking

Women students serving food

1965 Wolf Yearbook "Pumpkin Bowl"

1969 Wolf Yearbook Powder Puff

The Loyola Lady is available in the University Archives Vertical File in Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday, 9-4:30pm.

Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats

"This book is respectfully dedicated to those friends who have assisted its composition by their encouragement, criticism and suggestions: and in particular to Mr. T.E. Faber, Miss Alison Tandy, Miss Susan Wolcott, Miss Susanna Morley, and the Man in White Spats.

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats dedication

Today is Respect Your Cat Day (yes, apparently that is a thing). In celebration, enjoy this 1939 first edition of T. S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats from the Robert Giroux Book Collection of 20th century American writers.

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Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats cover

Of course, many people best know this work for Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical adaptation, Cats.

The Trailer for CATS – Released in 1998! | Cats the Musical

This book and many more Eliot resources are available for research in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

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Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats back cover