Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Collection Spotlight: Gulf Restoration Network Archives

Interested in learning more about Louisiana’s waterways and their environmental history? The Gulf Restoration Network Archives are a great place to conduct such research. The Gulf Restoration Network was formed in 1994 by environmental groups, conservationists and activists in New Orleans dedicated to the study of ecological sustainability along the Gulf of Mexico.  From the collection finding aid: (The Gulf Restoration Network) has focused on three areas of work: fostering sustainable management of fisheries; stopping polluted run-off that results in the Gulfs Dead Zone; and opposing Corps of Engineers policies that destroy wetlands. It reports on its work in the quarterly newspaper GRN NEWS, which includes the insert Fish Tales. The collection is arranged alphabetically by subject and dates roughly between 1995 and 2001. It consists mainly of correspondence, grants and proposals, and sign-ons and comments. It also contains considerable materials related to the Dead Zone, fisheries and Corps of Engineers projects.

Featured below is one of many spiral-bound reports affiliated with the GRN archives. This particular report is dated from September 1973 and addresses the economic and environmental impacts of industry along Louisiana’s waterways.
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Learn more about this collection in the SCA Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of Monroe Library!

12-3-1947: A Streetcar Named Desire on Broadway

Prior to its opening night on Broadway, the Tennessee Williams play had a brief stint at the Shubert Theatre in New Haven, Connecticut, but eventually made a home at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in New York City from December 3, 1947 – December 17, 1949. The stage production starred Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski and Jessica Tandy as Blanche DuBois.

In 1978, Susan Snowden Palmer sat down with Tennessee Williams in Atlanta, Georgia during the rehearsal of his play Tiger Tail. The interview was published in issue 1, volume 6 of the New Orleans Review.

In the interview, Williams discusses his experiences with the various adaptations of his plays. The focus of the interview is on Tiger Tail, but he goes into detail about what gets censored in film adaptations versus stage adaptations and how different each individual adaptation is unique. Williams acknowledges that he has no way of knowing whether or not his then-new play will live up to the successes of A Streetcar Named Desire and The Glass Menagerie, but he didn’t seemed too worried.

Read the full article and interview from the Loyola University New Orleans J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library Digital New Orleans Review Collection (pg 31-33) or the New Orleans Review digital archive (pg 28-30).

To see more of the New Orleans Review digital collection check the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives and to see more from the New Orleans Review, including recent web features and to purchase the most recent issues, go to the New Orleans Review website and Twitter.

Posted by student worker Samantha.

Madama Butterfly

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If you were bored 54 years ago, you could have gone and seen Madama Butterfly at the New Orleans Opera this time of year! It’s an Italian opera centered around romance and honor. The synopsis from this website is posted below,

“This tragic tale revolves around the young Japanese geisha, Butterfly. She is to be married to Pinkerton, an American Officer on assignment in Nagasaki. Butterfly is young and naive, and fully believes her marriage to Pinkerton to be true and everlasting, while Pinkerton intends on marrying an American when he returns home. Butterfly waits for Pinkerton to return, having had a child by him that he does not know about. He returns, but with his new American wife, intending to take the child back to America. Rather than live in shame, Butterfly agrees to give up her child, but intends to kill herself out of honor. She kills herself to save the honor of her family, and for love.”

The last performance by the New Orleans Opera was in 2013, so it is quite possible to see it once again on their stage in the future. Even though it isn’t playing now, you should still check out the New Orleans Opera, because they have a bunch of amazing performances coming up.

If you would like to see this pamphlet from 1964, it is located in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in Special Collections & Archives. We are also currently digitizing all of the programs in the collection; so far, you can see programs from 1943-1963 in the New Orleans Opera Association Archives in the Louisiana Digital Library. You can ALSO see more items like this in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives in our current exhibit, Encore! Encore! Bravi! Presenting the New Orleans Opera Association Archives.

Happy holidays!

This blog was written by student worker Miranda.

10,095 photos and counting!

Student worker Raven Evans (previously here) was hard at work last summer digitizing over 1,000 new images for the University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. Here are some favorites…

Loyola alum Morgus the Magnificent (aka Sid Noel) thrilling some students in 1957

Balloons!

Students eating boiled crawfish

Student acrobats

Cracker Jack?

Loyola’s next alumnus?

These and many (MANY!) more like them can be found in the University Photographs Collection. Thank you to Raven for all of her hard work!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

My Louisiana

Special Collections has a new item on the shelf! My Louisiana, with music by Henri Wehrmann and words by Russell McGuire, is one-half of a two-song set that was recently added to the archives.

The other side is a song named after our city.

To keep this item safe on the shelf, Special Collections & Archives Project Assistant Sara White made this enclosure for the item:

More information about Wehrmann, a noted engraver, musician, and teacher, can be found in this book. Wehrmann’s papers are also held by the Louisiana Research Collection at Tulane University.

To see this item, come visit us Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30 on the third floor of the Monroe Library in Special Collections & Archives.

This blog was written by student worker Maureen.

The Fair Grounds: A Thanksgiving Tradition

The New Orleans Fair Grounds began operation in their current location in 1852 as the Union Race Course, making it the oldest site of racing in America still in operation. The racing season is traditionally kicked off at the Fair Grounds on Thanksgiving Day, so ladies, it’s time to get your fancy hats ready.

Special Collections & Archives is home to a few pieces of horse-racing memorabilia.  The Elizabeth Adolph Collection of Early 20th Century New Orleans Sports Memorabilia contains two printed silk programs from the Crescent City Jockey Club dated 1904 and 1906. The Crescent City Jockey Club was established in 1892 at what is now the New Orleans Fair Grounds.  For 16 years, the club ran a winter racing season from mid-December until early April. However, in 1908 Louisiana passed a state law which halted horse racing in New Orleans for a time.  While the club held on to their lease at the fair grounds for several years hoping that racing would be allowed to return, they eventually had to liquidate their assets in the spring of 1913.

While the Fair Grounds are now famously home to Jazz Fest, in 1899 they were also home to the Louisiana Industrial Exposition and Peace Jubilee, “The 1st Annual Exposition…held under the auspices of the New Orleans Progressive Union, in the City of New Orleans, May 8th to 31st inclusive, 1899 .” The fair was repeated in 1900, but seems to have ceased after that date.

To view these items in their entirety, contact Loyola University Special Collections & Archives at archives@loyno.edu or come see us on the third floor of the Monroe Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: New Orleans Review Collection

New Orleans Review Collection: Archives of the Loyola-based books and literature magazine from its inception in 1968 through 1980, Collection 03.

The New Orleans Review (NOR) began in 1967-1968 when Loyola faculty member Miller Williams studied the feasibility of the university publishing a journal of literature and culture. Such a venture, Williams concluded, would enhance Loyola’s intellectual life. Loyola President Homer Jolley, S.J., approved the project, and in the fall of 1968 the first issue of the NOR appeared. The journal’s first three issues were published by Loyola for the New Orleans Consortium–which consisted of St. Mary’s Dominican College, Xavier University, and Loyola. Thereafter, Loyola put out the NOR on its own. Although intended originally as a quarterly, the journal soon settled into a publication schedule of three times each year.

Founders of the NOR aimed to create a literary and cultural journal that would appeal to a broadly literate readership, rather than only to a specialist or academic audience. It would draw from diverse intellectual disciplines and arts. It . would feature fiction, poetry, essays, interviews, photography, book reviews. It would enlist contributions from the accomplished as well as from the beginning writer or artist. It would provide a forum for Loyola faculty and students. And it would demonstrate the university’s commitment to intellectual and artistic endeavor.

Here is a Contributors Sheet from Subseries V-B for Julio Cortázar and the Dummy Sheet from Subseries V-C for the International Issue his work appeared in :

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The New Orleans Review Collection has been arranged into seven series based on types of material: Correspondence; Copy; History of the New Orleans Review; Toole Manuscript; Miscellaneous; Printed Material; Photographic Material. In addition, Series II (Copy) and Series V (Miscellaneous) have been divided into subseries. Material in this collection dates between 1968 and 1980 –mainly between 1970 and 1978.

The most valuable material is found in the Correspondence and the Copy series and in the Minutes subseries of Series V. Correspondence and minutes document the staff’s functioning. Exchanges between staff and contributors is also found in the correspondence. The Copy series follows the author’s manuscript through the editing process. Researchers may wish to consult issues of the New Orleans Review.  These are located both in the Department of Special Collections and Archives and in the University Library’s Serials Collection.

Another interesting element in this collection is the Toole Manuscript, a copyedited copy of Ignatius Reilly (AKA Confederacy of Dunces) by John Kennedy Toole (2 chapters of the novel were published in the New Orleans Review at Walker Percy’s insistence before the full publication of the novel):

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You can research the New Orleans Review Collection Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30 in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in the Special Collections & Archives of Loyola University New Orleans.

Found in the Archives: Estrays

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Today we take a glance at a thin volume of poetry. Estrays was first published in 1918 and then again edited and in hardcover in 1920. It is populated with poetry composed by the poets: Thomas Kennedy, George Steele SeymourVincent Starrett, and Basil Thompson.

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Below is a selection of a poem that that is both representative of the collections’ title and themes (estray : stray); The Quest, by Thomas Kennedy.

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You can browse either edition Monday – Friday from 9:00-4:30  in Booth-Bricker Reading Room inside the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Drawing Loyola’s Jesuit and Musical Identities

Check out these drawings from the 1940s! The probable artist is Alex A. Bucher, who graduated from Loyola with a degree in Music Education in 1947.

These drawings give a new meaning to the term “sacred music!”

What do you think? How would you design a logo for College of Music & Fine Arts today?

These drawings are in a collection that is currently being processed in  the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives. Also, be sure to check the Montage Events calendar for upcoming CMFA events!

This blog was written by student worker Maureen.

Le Scarabée D’or

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Even though Halloween is over, there’s still time to appreciate things on the creepier side! These are a few pictures from a French copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Gold Bug printed in 1892. This story was one of the most popular ones during his lifetime, and was submitted for a writing contest in the Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper, for which he earned the grand prize of $100 dollars, or about $3,230 today. Not only that, but this popularized the idea of cryptography, because the plot is based around an epic treasure hunt, which contains a rather complex cryptogram, with an explanation on how to crack it. So if you like mysteries with a couple chills down your spine, maybe you should check it out!

Call No. PS2615 .R822

This item and more can be viewed in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Blog by student worker Miranda Renzi.