Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Ash Wednesday

Carnival is over. Lent has begun. Here in Special Collections & Archives we are marking the occasion with a poem: T.S. Eliot’s Ash Wednesday.

Originally published in 1930 by Faber and Faber, our copy was published in 1933 at the Alcuin Press, England.

Listen to Eliot read Ash Wednesday here, and come read it for yourself in Special Collections & Archives.

The King of Ireland’s Son by Padraic Colum

To continue with a theme we introduced on Tuesday with our post on James Joyce, we bring you another Irish writer from our special collections.

Padraic Colum was an actor, writer and participant in the Irish Literary Renaissance.  Close friends with James Joyce, he helped type pages for Finnegan’s Wake as well as wrote a biographical reminiscence about Joyce with his wife Mary Colum called Our Friend James Joyce.

The Padraic Colum book from our collections that we chose to showcase today is his children’s novel, The King of Ireland’s Son.

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Beautifully illustrated by Hungarian illustrator Willy Pogany, the book is a collection of Irish folktales.

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Written when Colum was living in the United States, and published the same year as the 1916 Easter Rising, his writings sought to bring the myth, folklore, and the dream of Ireland to children and adults alike.

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This volume is available for viewing Monday through Friday in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room from 9:00 – 4:30.

It is also available online in both digital book and audio book form.

Color Our Collections Week!

It is Color Our Collections week! A week-long special collections coloring event inspired by the current coloring craze and the fabulous images found inside special collections worldwide. Organized by the New York Academy of Medicine and happening from February 1st through the 5th.

Follow this LINK to download, print, and color images from volume one of British zoologist John Gould’s publication The Birds of Great Britain.

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Once you’ve colored your picture(s) share them to social media including the hashtags #ColorOurCollections and #loynosca!

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Today also happens to be the 135th anniversary of John Gould’s death. Gould was a British zoologist active throughout the mid-19th century and known chiefly for the over 3000 hand colored lithographs that he produced throughout his career. The first volume of The Birds of Great Britain, can be found in Special Collections & Archives at Loyola’s Monroe Library and online as part of our digital collections.

Follow these links to explore some of the other institutions participating in Color Our Collections Week and happy coloring!

See Also: More Libraries Participating in Color Our Collections Week

Special Collections: James Joyce

Today marks the 134 birthday of James Joyce, and on the 22nd it will be the 94th anniversary of the first full publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses, by publisher and famous bookstore owner Sylvia Beach.

First published in installments by The Little Review starting in March of 1918, the book takes place over the course of one day, June 16, 1920. This day is now celebrated as Bloomsday, named after the protagonist of the book, Leopold Bloom.

Reading the book is a goal for many though it is a book few complete. To quote the New York Times review by Dr. Joseph Collins, “Not ten men or women out of a hundred can read Ulysses through [...] I am probably the only person, aside from the author, that has ever read it twice from beginning to end.” It does however have a benefit for those who finish it, as Collins purports, “I have learned more psychology and psychiatry from it than I did in ten years at the Neurological Institute.”

In celebration of James Joyce’s birthday and to illustrate our love of difficult but rewarding books, we offer you a preview of some of our more unique tiles by and about Joyce from our collections.

James Joyce, a critical introduction, by Harry Levin.

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An exagmination of James Joyce; analyses of the “Work in progress”, by Samuel Beckett, Marcel Brion, Frank Budgen and others…

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Pomes penyeach / by James Joyce.

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Recollections of James Joyce / by his brother Stanislaus Joyce ; translated from the Italian by Ellsworth Mason.

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Yes… these titles are available for research in the Special Collections & Archives Booth-Bricker Reading Room Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 4:30 PM.

Lunch at Tujague’s in 1945

Maude Liersch Scrapbook Cover

One of the fascinating things about reading through someone’s personal papers are the minute details you uncover. One such example is from this scrapbook, inscribed “Florida 1945 Ado + Neva” on the cover.

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Maude Lehman Liersch (1895-1977) assembled this scrapbook to document several trips she took with her husband Joe, a physician and son of one of Kansas City’s pioneer druggists. The bulk of the scrapbook is taken up by a road trip the Lierschs took with friends Adolph “Ado” or “Otto” F.  (1884-1961) and Neva  Wiedenmann Seidel (1890-1979) from October 27-November 9, 1945. The quartet began in their hometown of Kansas City, Missouri and circled the Midwestern, Southeastern, and Southwestern United States. Destinations included Springfield, MO; Memphis and Chattanooga, Tennessee; Tifton, Georgia;  Melbourne, Key West, Fort Myers, Sulphur Spring, Silver Springs, and Pensacola, Florida; New Orleans and Thibodeaux, Louisiana; Houston, Texas; and Mena, Arkansas. Maude took detailed notes of all food and beverage as well as prices for their accommodations. In her entry for their visit to New Orleans, she writes:

Tuesday, Nov. 6 – 1945

Left at 5:20 a.m. Went through Bankhead tunnel under Mobile river at Mobile, Ala. 25c – Had breakfast at Mobile at Toddle House. Waffle and ham – Service was poor as changed shifts – boys left and girls came on. Joe and I did not get coffee. Stopped at Biloxi for sweet rolls and coffee – Very good. Reached New Orleans 10:50 a.m. Took a guide $2.00 each – all over old part of New Orleans as well as new. Had lunch at 2 o’clock at “Tujague’s” – soup, meat, lettuce, roast beef, cauliflower, hard bread, cream puff, coffee. Had coffee and donuts at old market. Went on wharf where were unloading coffee from Brazil and then conducted over U.S. Mississippi. Berries from a camphor tree in cemetery. Detour to Thibodeaux - French people – stayed at Dixie Hotel. Almost did not get a place to stay. Each had a room – just wash stand in room. $2.00 couple. Ate in Hotel. Asked if wished French drip or Maxwell House coffee. Walked around town – Bought clothespins 25c doz. Night at Thibodeaux. One of the first trading posts between New Orleans, and country along Teche Bayou. Adjacent to oil field.

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Tujague’s, est. 1856, is the second oldest restaurant in the French Quarter. A look at their current menu shows many of the same dishes Maude ate.

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Perennial Special Collections favorite The Bachelor in New Orleans (published in 1942) described Tujague’s as “an old timey drinkery that pays little attention to fashion in bars. Here you will find no red leather bar stools, no super-duper fixtures. Here is drink served in the way and in the surroundings your father drank it. Specialty of the house is the Absinthe frappe.”

This scrapbook is part of the Anthony Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary Collection and is currently on display in our exhibit Media Traditions:  Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation along with other scrapbooks that draw correlations between memory archives of the past and contemporary modes of self-presentation. Portions of the exhibit are view-able from the Monroe Library 3rd floor hallway and the rest are in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections and Archives Reading Room, open Monday – Friday 9am-4:30pm.

More Mardi Gras archives

Looking for more historic Mardi Gras miscellany? Then check out our previous blog post about The Collection of New Orleans Miscellany which contains an invitation to the 1882 Independent Order of the Moon (I.O.O.M.) ball.

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The blog post can be read in its entirety here, or come see us in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room to find out more about this collection.

Collection Spotlight: Carnival

It’s Mardi Gras season, meaning it’s the perfect time to highlight some of Special Collections & Archives’ Mardi Gras collections.

1899 Proteus Invitation

1899 Proteus Invitation

1899 Proteus Invitation, side 2

1899 Proteus Invitation, side 2

The New Orleans Carnival Collection is an artificial collection informally collected over time. New Orleans has been celebrating Mardi Gras since the mid 19th century. Private organizations, known as krewes, sponsor annual public parades and private balls. This collection consists of the ball programs and some invitations to these events produced by various krewes from the 1870s through to the 1970s.

1880 Comus admittance card

1880 Comus admittance card

While the collection contains materials related to Mardi Gras Super Krewes like Rex and Comus, it also contains ball miscellany from several historically black krewes.

1977 Original Illinois Club ball program

1977 Original Illinois Club ball program

1969 Young Men Illinois Club ball program

1969 Young Men Illinois Club ball program

The Original Illinois Club, formed by Pullman porters in 1894 in response to the whites-only krewes of New Orleans, was the first black carnival organization. The Young Men Illinois Club split from the Original and formed in 1927. The Illinois Clubs, along with the Beau Brummell Club, Plantation Revelers, and the Bunch Club, were created to sponsor traditional, invitation-only balls for presenting young black debutantes. Subsequent black krewes included the Capetowners (1935), the Plantation Revelers (1939),  the Dunbar Club (1946), and the Bon Temps (1947).

1970 Plantation Revelers ball program

1970 Plantation Revelers ball program

1970 Dunbar Club ball program

1970 Dunbar Club ball program

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970, 1977 Capetowners Carnival Club ball programs

1970 Bon Temps ball program

1970 Bon Temps ball program

You can see more images from this collection in this previous blog post. For more information about the history of black New Orleanians and Mardi Gras, see New Orleans on parade : tourism and the transformation of the crescent cityThe Mardi Gras Indians : the ethnomusicology of black associations in New Orleans, The “Baby Dolls” : breaking the race and gender barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras tradition, Lords of misrule : Mardi Gras and the politics of race in New Orleans, and Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

This collection and the books listed above are available for research use in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room on the 3rd floor of the library Monday – Friday, 9am-4:30pm.

Collection Spotlight: Janet Mary Riley Papers

Collection Spotlight: Janet Mary Riley Papers

Janet Mary Riley is pictured on the top row, at left.

This photograph, along with over 6,700 others, is part of the Loyola University Photographs Collection which is available to view online through the Louisiana Digital Library.

Janet Mary Riley was the first woman to hold a full-time law school faculty position in New Orleans and is credited with helping to change Louisiana law to make women equal partners in their marriages. Janet Mary Riley was born in New Orleans in 1915. She earned her B.A., cum laude, from Loyola University New Orleans in 1936. After a short time teaching in public schools, Riley earned her B.S. in Library Science from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. She returned to New Orleans as an assistant in the circulation department of the New Orleans Public Library and later as an assistant librarian at Loyola University. In 1943, during World War II, Riley left Loyola to serve as Post Librarian at Camp Plauche and LaGarde General Hospital, both in New Orleans.

After the war, Riley returned to Loyola to work as a law librarian and, in an effort to become familiar with the language and literature of law, began taking courses at the law school. This led to her work as a substitute law instructor. In 1952, Riley graduated third in a class of 28 from Loyola Law School. In 1956, she was hired as the first full-time female law professor in New Orleans and the seventh in the United States. At the age of 43, in 1960, she earned an L.L.M. from the University of Virginia. In 1971, after teaching for 15 years, she achieved the rank of Professor of Law. Riley retired in 1986, but continued to teach seminars until 1997.

During her tenure as a law professor, Riley wrote the first casebook on Louisiana community property law, Louisiana Community Property – Cases and Materials on Louisiana Property Law and Marriage, which was published in 1972. The following year, the Louisiana State Law Institute appointed Riley to lead a committee to draft proposed revisions to the Louisiana Civil Code on matrimonial regimes, community property and all Louisiana legislation which unreasonably discriminated on the basis of sex. Until then, Louisiana’s community property laws made the husband “head and master of the community” and thus granted him total control of his wife’s assets. Riley’s proposed “equal management” approach to the community, which let either spouse manage the property of the marriage, was adopted by the Louisiana legislature in 1978 and formally incorporated into the Civil Code in 1980.

In addition to her efforts on behalf of women, Riley worked to eliminate racial discrimination. She was a member of the Commission on Human Rights of the Catholic Committee of the South, which assisted in the implementation of the New Orleans Archbishop’s 1953 order forbidding any further racial segregation in Catholic Churches. She was a member of the Community Relations Council, a bi-racial group in New Orleans, which worked toward the integration of playgrounds, restaurants and other public spaces.

Riley was an attorney of record and wrote the Petitioners’ Brief in Lombard v. Louisiana, a pivotal sit-in case heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in the early 1960s. In that case, four students, three of whom were black and one of whom was white, were arrested and convicted of trespassing after refusing to leave a New Orleans lunch counter reserved for whites only. The state court upheld the convictions, but the U.S. Supreme Court reversed and held that the Louisiana decision enforced racial discrimination and therefore could not stand.

Riley was a member of the Society of Our Lady of the Way, a secular organization of employed unmarried women that followed the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola, taking vows of chastity, obedience and poverty, and striving to find a balance between worship of God and life in the world.

In 2000, Riley received the Adjutor Hominum award, presented annually to an outstanding alumnus of Loyola whose life exemplifies moral character, service to humanity and unquestionable integrity. Two years later, the Janet Mary Riley Distinguished Professorship was established. In 2004, Riley received the St. Ives Award, presented annually to a Loyola Law School graduate who has volunteered services to the law school or the university, maintained the highest standards of the profession, and furthered the mission of the alumni association. In 2005, Loyola Law School gave Riley an honorary doctorate. She died in 2008 at the age of 92.

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The arrangement of this collection is alphabetical and based on Janet Mary Riley’s own organization. The collection spans from 1934 until 1991, with the bulk spanning from 1965 until 1979.

The Papers primarily reflect Riley’s academic career, including documents on the courses she taught: Community Property, Canon Law, Constitutional Law, Donations, First Amendment, Insurance Law, Juvenile Law, Legal Bibliography, Obligations, Persons, Successions, and Trusts and Estates. Also included are papers reflecting Riley’s vast university service on the Curriculum Committee, Faculty Council, Faculty Handbook Negotiating Committee, Institutional Self-Study / Steering Committee, Loyola Law Review, Rank and Tenure Committee, Student Petitions Committee for Admissions and Readmissions, St. Thomas More Law Club and the University Senate.

Papers on academic conferences, association affiliations, articles authored by Riley, awards and honors received by her, general correspondence and faculty meeting minutes and memorandums can be found within the collection.

A significant portion is dedicated to her efforts with the Louisiana State Law Institute to revise antiquated community property laws contained in the Civil Code. The collection includes materials and drafts of her book, Louisiana Community Property – Cases and Materials on Louisiana Property Law and Marriage. A copy of this book can be found in Special Collections, Monroe Library, Loyola University (KFL 97 .R5 1972).

Riley’s work on outside cases, issues and organizations is represented but is a small minority of the collection. These include federal contempt proceedings, divorce law, the Equal Rights Amendment, Equal Credit Opportunity Law, family law, First Amendment rights, juvenile justice, the League of Women Voters, the Louisiana Library Association, and the Louisiana State Bar Association Admissions Advisory Committee.

To view an oral history video of Janet Mary Riley, visit the Louisiana Bar Foundation’s website.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

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Welcome back, Wolf Pack!

Pictured above: Loyola University graduates Lloyd Frischhertz and Bobby Reichert, founders of the Krewe of Tucks

These photographs, along with over 6,700 others, are part of the Loyola University Photographs Collection and are available to view online through the Louisiana Digital Library.

Today as we welcome students back to campus, Carnival season is well underway!

Carnival season begins each year on January 6th, referred to as the Feast of Epiphany, Twelfth Night, or Three Kings Day. Mass consumption of King Cake and celebration ensues, culminating in Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday. This year, Mardi Gras will be celebrated on February 9th; however, the date of Mardi Gras varies from year to year based on the moveable date of Easter, but it is always 47 days preceding Easter on the day prior to Ash Wednesday.

For visitors and New Orleanians alike, Mardi Gras in New Orleans: An Illustrated History by Arthur Hardy, the gentleman revered as the authority on Carnival celebrations in New Orleans, provides an excellent place from which to start researching the festivities. Here in Special Collections & Archives, we invite you to delve into this text as well as our New Orleans Carnival Collection which preserves ball programs and invitations produced by various krewes from the 1870s through to the 1970s.

Special Collections & Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

Loyola Basketball Films Digitized

Thanks to very generous donations from alumnus and former basketball player John Erb ’67 and alumnus and former Vice President for Institutional Advancement Charles Young ’64, Special Collections & Archives has added 38 basketball films to its digital collections.

The films depict game excerpts from 1960-1969 against a variety of opponents. Many of Loyola’s basketball players from this era are now members of the Wolfpack Hall of Fame including Charles Powell, Charlie Jones, Tyrone “Ty The Guy” Marioneaux, Bob Bissant, Wayne Pietri, and Lawrence J. Hoyt, and fans of LSU star “Pistol” Pete Maravich will spot him as well. The collection also includes film of the 1964 inaugural Hall of Fame Sports Banquet.

Erb and Young’s donations were used to fund the digitization. The films were digitized by the Center for Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Due to their fragile condition the films had been restricted from use by patrons, so the digitization has enabled a previously hidden collection to be exposed to the public.

Some of the films are unlabeled–anyone with identifying information about a film can email archives@loyno.edu with more information.

Special Collections & Archives is very grateful to both John Erb and Charlie Young for making this possible, as well as to ULL’s Center for Louisiana Studies for their excellent work on the digitization.

All 38 films may be viewed in the Louisiana Digital Library. For more archival collections related to Loyola athletics, see the Loyola University Athletics Collection, the University Archives, the digitized Maroon newspaper and Wolf yearbooks, and the University Photographs Collection.