Archive for the ‘Found in Archives’ Category

Light in August Around the World

Set in Mississippi and Alabama, William Faulkner’s Light In August traces the journey of pregnant Lena Grove to find Joe Brown, the father of her child, as well as the exploits of Joe Brown’s bootlegging partner Joe Christmas. When asked about the book’s title, Faulkner said, “…in August in Mississippi there’s a few days somewhere about the middle of the month when suddenly there’s a foretaste of fall, it’s cool, there’s a lambence, a luminous quality to the light, as though it came not from just today but from back in the old classic times. It might have fauns and satyrs and the gods and—from Greece, from Olympus in it somewhere. It lasts just for a day or two, then it’s gone. . .the title reminded me of that time, of a luminosity older than our Christian civilization” (from Reading Faulkner: Light in August: Glossary and Commentary by Hugh Ruppersburg).

Light in August was published in 1932, and the first translation was published in French in 1935. Special Collections & Archives has copies of the novel translated into over 10 languages in the Patrick Samway Collection.

English First Printing, 1932

Danish 1981

Spanish 1970

Croatian 1977

Romanian 1973

Portuguese 1973

Japanese 1967

Italian 1974

Hungarian 1964

German 1949

French 1935

Bonus: the University of Michigan has a 1975 Russian version.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Wolfpack Olympians

The 2016 Summer Olympics are in full force, so now seems like a good time to remember some of Loyola’s Olympians of years past.

1933 Wolf Yearbook picture of Emmett Toppino and Tad Gormley

Emmett Toppino and Tad Gormley in the 1933 Wolf Yearbook

Emmett Toppino, “the Loyola flash,” won gold in the 4×100 m relay team at the 1932 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Toppino, with teammates Bob Kiesel, Hec Dyer, and Frank Wykoff, set a new world record under associate coach Tad Gormley, Loyola’s boxing, basketball and track coach and football trainer.

Picture of Tad Gormley with football team

Tad Gormley with the Loyola football team, 1938

Gormley also coached Olympic gold medalist and Loyola alum Eddie Flynn, welterweight boxing champion at the 1932 Summer Games.

1933 Wolf Yearbook pictures of Eddie Flynn and Rolland Romero

Eddie Flynn and Rolland Romero in the 1933 Wolf Yearbook

Also pictured above is Rolland Romero, a Loyola triple jumper who competed in both the 1932 and 1936 Olympics.

Eugene Henry “Gene” Walet, III competed in the 1956 and 1960 Summer Olympics in sailing. Walet was a product of the Southern Yacht Club (previously blogged about here).

1955 Wolf Yearbook feature on Gene Walet

1955 Wolf Yearbook feature on Gene Walet

2002 saw another Wolfpack connection. Ashley Muir, a junior psychology major, was chosen as one of the torchbearers through New Orleans preceding the Winter Games in Salt Lake City.

2002-01-18 Maroon article about Ashley Muir

2002-01-18 Maroon article about Ashley Muir

Do you know of any other Wolfpack/Olympic connections? Let us know in the comments!

Collection Spotlight: Deiler Papers

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from J. Hanno Deiler Papers Box 1 Folder 5, "Church and Parish Records: Carrollton, 1848-1900"

Today marks 167 years since the birth of J. Hanno Deiler, creator of Special Collections & Archives’ J. Hanno Deiler Papers. Deiler was born at Altoetting, Upper Bavaria on August 8, 1849. In 1871 he accepted a position as principal of a German school in New Orleans.  He arrived in New Orleans early in 1872, and in 1879 he became professor of German at the University of Louisiana, which later became Tulane University.

It was Deiler’s ambition to cultivate a taste for German literature, culture, and song in New Orleans and to improve the condition of Germans in the United States.  He served for many years as director of the Deutsche Gesellschaft, an immigrant aid society.  He started the German Archives for the History of the Germans in the South.  In 1882 he founded and served as president of the New Orleans Quartette Club,  which was dedicated to the preservation of German culture and song.  He was president of the New Orleans German Gazette Publishing Company and wrote extensively about Germans in the United States, especially in Louisiana,  contributing to numerous German and American periodicals and authoring one book, The Settlement of the German Coast of Louisiana and the Creoles of German Descent (available in digitized form here and here at the Internet Archive).  In 1898 the German Emperor recognized Deiler’s literary achievements and his services to the German people in the U.S. by conferring upon him knighthood in the Order of the Crown. Deiler died at his summer home in Covington, Louisiana on July 20, 1909.

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from J. Hanno Deiler Papers Box 1 Folder 2, "Census of German Villages, 1724 "

These papers consist principally of notes Deiler took while researching the history of Germans and German-Americans in Louisiana.  They also contain writings by Deiler, a small amount of correspondence, and miscellaneous items.  Much of the material is undated; most items probably originated between 1890 and 1909.

Additional materials relating to Deiler are available at the Historic New Orleans Collection, including the Deutsches Haus Collection.

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from J. Hanno Deiler Papers Box 1 2 Folder 14, "Count de Leon, Duke of Jerusalem and the Colony 'Germantown,' Webster Parish, Louisiana"

This collection is available for research in the in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

Before there was Street-View

Being a fan of travelling to new destinations but not being able to do so as often as I would like, I love being able to look at pictures of the places I wish to go.  Seeing places in a photograph allows you to imagine yourself seeing it in person for the first time, but with modern technology you can be right in front of that famous monument with just a click of a button thanks to developments such as Google’s Street-View option in their maps.

Although, in 1893 before the time of the internet, and back when travelling across the world was not as easily accessible, people relied on picture books such as Thomas Knox’s “Scenes from Every Land” to see the famous places they wished to travel. And those people who could not see these sites with their own eyes were exactly who this book was directed towards, as General Lee Wallace addresses in the introduction, “ To the few who have traveled; to the many who would like to go abroad, , but are restrained by timidity; to the lacking in funds; to the sick and convalescent who promise themselves sight of the world when health will permit; more especially, to the multitude of unfortunates, who, on account of incurable ailments of whatever kinds, can never hope to escape the narrow confines in which their lots are cast, I venture to address this introduction.”
Scenes From Every Land

This particular book holds over 500 pictures from around the world, from Syria to New Zealand and famous buildings to museum galleries, this book shows it all. But one thing that is interesting to wonder when flipping through the pages of this book is how many of these famous sites have changed since the late 1800s, and thanks to Google Street-View we are able to see just how different, if at all, things are. Just click the links below each picture to see how they are today.

Westminster Abbey, London

Westminster Abbey, London

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower, Paris

The Vatican, Rome

The Vatican, Rome

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The Colosseum, Rome

Leaning Tower of Pisa

The Campanile, or Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

Court of Lions in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain

Court of Lions in the Alhambra , Granada, Spain

St. Basil

St. Basil, the Beatified, Moscow

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Great Pyramid and Sphinx, Egypt

Cleopatra's Needle, Alexandria, Egypt

Cleopatra’s Needle, New York

(The obelisk was originally in Alexandria, Egypt when this photo was taken but was later moved to Central Park in New York City in 1881)

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Washington Monument, Washington D.C.

Faulkner’s “Mosquitoes”

Special Collections and Archives holds many editions of the of the works of William Faulkner. Here is a look at some editions of Mosquitoes, an early novel of Faulkner’s set in New Orleans and aboard a boat in Lake Pontchartrain.

You can view these books in person Monday through Friday 9:00 – 4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rdfloor of Monroe Library.

Vintage Summer

It’s hot out there! Enjoy these photos of Loyolians of the past taking advantage of the warm weather.

"Children's Art Classes - Cynthia Clark - teacher 1973 (summer)"

"Children's Art Classes - Summer 1973."

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants (Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen)

Published in 1828, Deutschlands wildwachsende Arzney-Pflanzen (Germany’s Wild Medicinal Plants), by Johann Gottlieb Mann, contains hand-colored lithographs of medical plants, flowers, and fruits. Here is a small selection. To view more of these lithographs click HERE to access them via Louisiana Digital Library.

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

	Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, New Orleans, LA. http://library.loyno.edu/research/speccoll/

SCA’s Newest Detective

In 1962, Domingo performed with the New Orleans Opera House Association for the first time as Lord Arturo Bucklaw. This was only his second performance in America (after his U.S. debut at the Dallas Civic Opera)! In this same program, is one of the shortest "artist bios" ever to be written under his now internationally famous name. Come and see it for yourself when you visit us in the SCA (third floor of Monroe Library)!

One of my more exciting projects this summer is working in the Loyola Special Collections & Archives department at Monroe Library. I first learned how to navigate a library via the Dewey Decimal System during my kindergarten year at Hynes Elementary School in Lakeview. There is nothing quite like the thrill of researching, seeking, and finding sources in the library. Those moments when you get lost in shelves because there are more books than you thought there would be on your topic or even a topic you had not considered; the sounds of silence; the scents of the books…I could go on forever about the joys of ‘the library’! Monroe Library at Loyola is an unforgettable one. There has always been a special little place in my heart, where I’ve imagined myself a librarian. Here I am. Tucked away on the third floor, in a quiet and magical place is: The Special Collections and Archives Department. I was hired to take on this part time position as a student worker and am receiving a music industry internship credit. The people I work with are as lovely as they are intelligent (and librarians are very smart, duh!). We all wear sweaters not because sweaters complete the “adorable librarian” look, but because most of the collections in our in our department are extremely old and in order to best preserve them, temperatures are set very low.

Floyd is famous for his operatic composition of Susannah (an opera in two acts). The composer wrote Susannah and Markheim essentially for the specific voice and character of international and local star Norman Treigle. The world premiere of Markheim took place in March 1966 after Treigle insisted it happen in his hometown of New Orleans! The performance captured national coverage and was a huge success.

My journey in the archives began and will end with the New Orleans Opera Association. My primary job this summer is to search through the extensive New Orleans Opera Association archives and find interesting photos, documents, programs, etc. to display in the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit coming this Fall 2016! What seemed a daunting and vague task (as SA&C has almost 100 boxes of NOOA historical content) has turned into one of the most interesting and exciting research projects I’ve ever encountered! The timeline I am working with is from February 1943 – the beginning of the New Orleans Opera House Association – to the early 2000′s. This collection is over flowing with unique photographs, hand painted or sketched set designs, amusing correspondence, quaint scrapbooks, and reel to reel recordings of performances as old at 1947!

This watercolor set design of a 1966 production of Carmen is one of many hand painted or sketched plans in the NOOA collection. It is most fascinating to hold up the planned set next to the realized black and white photo of the stage!

A single page from one of the NOOA Women's Opera Guild Scrapbooks. The twenty-fifth anniversary season of the NOOHA was all about the big names in opera. For this particularly spectacular performance, Tito Capobianco staged an inventive production of Les Contes d'Hoffmann, featuring Beverly Sills (pictured here), John Alexander, and Norman Treigle.

Arthur G. Cosenza

This is my Grandfather. He is one of my most favorite people and he was active with the New Orleans Opera Association for over thirty-five years. From the 1953-54 season as a supporting baritone role; through the 60′s, 70′s, and 80′s as stage and/or artistic director; and from 1998 until his death in 2005 he served as the Emeritus Director of the association. What a handsome guy! Though he always told me, “Everyone looks better when they’re younger.”

This project has only just begun. I am looking forward to another month in the Monroe Library researching, seeking, and finding…

Written by Student Worker and Intern, Gloria S. Cosenza.

Lorraine “Lorena” Dureau

Lorraine Dureau Newsham graduated from Loyola University New Orleans in 1955 with a Bachelor of Music. She had become somewhat of a local celebrity, praised for her ability to be both a wife and student, but more importantly for her voice.  She was an up and coming opera singer, having performed with Norman Treigle during the 1940s and an active member of NORD (New Orleans Recreation Department), and was accepted to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House after finishing her time at Loyola but was unable to attend after suffering from a broken rib that put her out of work for the opera season.
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Devastated by her missed opportunity she sought out other options and was encouraged by Miguel Bernal, the dean of the College of Music at the time, to try her hand in Mexico where the opera scene was growing in popularity and was performing year round.  It is not clear by our records the exact time she left, but by 1957 Lorraine was in Mexico, apparently leaving everything behind, including her husband at the time, John Newsham. Her collection is full of photos and articles from her time in Mexico, giving us a picture of what her life was like and all of the people she met and grew close to.
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In Mexico she became a star and her music career soared while earning herself a new name in the process, Lorena Dureau. She preferred performing repertoire of her favorite songs rather than complete operas but excelled in both, appearing on stage, radio, and television, all while also furthering her career as a writer.

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She wrote articles for many publications around the world both during her time in Mexico and after returning to New Orleans in 1978. She had been writing short stories and poems since she was a little girl and took up the skill again as she led her singing career away from performing and in the direction of teaching and turned to novels.  While her first unpublished manuscript was titled By the Sword (date unknown) and written under the pen name Lorry Newman, her first published work was a book titled The Last Casquette Girl (1981), starting her on the trend of romance novels that would follow which included Lynette (1983), Iron Lace (1983), and Beloved Outcast (1987).


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After returning to New Orleans she captured the attention of a local businessman by the name of George Lehleitner, famous for his work both in the New Orleans community and his actions in helping both Alaska and Hawaii achieve statehood. George had seen an article about Lorraine that was written by an old family friend and contacted the friend to say that he was interested in meeting this fascinating woman. Persistent in his desire to meet Lorraine she eventually accepted his offer for lunch, starting the beginning of a wonderful relationship as the two were soon married and lived our their lives with each other, traveling to many places together as Lorraine also re-visited Mexico many times.

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Interesting cannot even begin to describe this woman as her collection takes you on a wild tale of one woman’s journey through life. From her days at NORD and Loyola to Mexico and opera, writing of romance novels and articles on voodoo, dolls, Mexican culture, and more.

This information is from the Lorraine Dureau collection, which is currently being processed at Loyola University New Orleans in the Special Collections & Archives by students.

Blog Post by Caitlin Page, a Special Collections Student Worker.

League of Women Voters

Tuesday, April 24, 1984 East Jefferson Times-Picayune/States-Item

The League of Women Voters was a prominent group in the United States from the sixties and through the nineties. The nationwide group had many roles to play and numerous progressive accomplishments including women’s suffrage. After distinguishing themselves in Jefferson Parish, the League decided to take on and suggest reform to the Louisiana Corrections System. The League wrote up a 120-page study about corrections problems, while specifically focusing on alternative punishments. The study concludes that there is a plethora of problems in the Louisiana prison system from being overcrowded, in violation of safety regulations, and simply not worth taxpayer’s money to run such an ineffective system. The League’s proposal was for alternative punishment for inmates who were not convicted felons, but for progressive programs other than jail to be an option for other inmates as an alternative to the traditional parole and work release.

 

 

 

 

September 3, 1987 Jefferson Parish Times & Democrat/Kenner City News

 

 

 

 

After the introduction the study continues with extremely well annotated and detailed information discussing the history of effective prison systems in the United States. An example provided is the Quakers of Pennsylvania. Their penal system was then adopted and manipulated which created the more commonplace method of a prison system. At that time, it was seen that prisons could be suitable for rehabilitation, but what time has shown is that is simply not the case. After this broad overview the League then writes about the history of the penal system in Louisiana and how much of a disaster it really is, but said elegant and politely. After schooling the state on its poor management of prisons and rehabilitation of inmates, the League provides alternatives and cases from other prison complexes, showing the vast improvements of other places around the country in comparison to Louisiana.

While the penal system of Louisiana is still well renowned for its corruption and ineffectiveness, the League of Women Voters was willing to step up to the challenge of reform. Organizing in the 1980’s to change such a rugged system as the Louisiana Corrections System shows the tenacity and dedication this group. The League was not just an organization for women to have positions and say in such matters, but to help change and progress American society as a whole.

This information is from the League of Women Voters collection, which is currently being processed at Loyola University New Orleans in the Special Collections & Archives by students.

Blog Post by Oliver Marston, a Special Collections intern.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.