Archive for the ‘Exhibits’ Category

SCA’s Newest Detective

In 1962, Domingo performed with the New Orleans Opera House Association for the first time as Lord Arturo Bucklaw. This was only his second performance in America (after his U.S. debut at the Dallas Civic Opera)! In this same program, is one of the shortest "artist bios" ever to be written under his now internationally famous name. Come and see it for yourself when you visit us in the SCA (third floor of Monroe Library)!

One of my more exciting projects this summer is working in the Loyola Special Collections & Archives department at Monroe Library. I first learned how to navigate a library via the Dewey Decimal System during my kindergarten year at Hynes Elementary School in Lakeview. There is nothing quite like the thrill of researching, seeking, and finding sources in the library. Those moments when you get lost in shelves because there are more books than you thought there would be on your topic or even a topic you had not considered; the sounds of silence; the scents of the books…I could go on forever about the joys of ‘the library’! Monroe Library at Loyola is an unforgettable one. There has always been a special little place in my heart, where I’ve imagined myself a librarian. Here I am. Tucked away on the third floor, in a quiet and magical place is: The Special Collections and Archives Department. I was hired to take on this part time position as a student worker and am receiving a music industry internship credit. The people I work with are as lovely as they are intelligent (and librarians are very smart, duh!). We all wear sweaters not because sweaters complete the “adorable librarian” look, but because most of the collections in our in our department are extremely old and in order to best preserve them, temperatures are set very low.

Floyd is famous for his operatic composition of Susannah (an opera in two acts). The composer wrote Susannah and Markheim essentially for the specific voice and character of international and local star Norman Treigle. The world premiere of Markheim took place in March 1966 after Treigle insisted it happen in his hometown of New Orleans! The performance captured national coverage and was a huge success.

My journey in the archives began and will end with the New Orleans Opera Association. My primary job this summer is to search through the extensive New Orleans Opera Association archives and find interesting photos, documents, programs, etc. to display in the New Orleans Opera Association exhibit coming this Fall 2016! What seemed a daunting and vague task (as SA&C has almost 100 boxes of NOOA historical content) has turned into one of the most interesting and exciting research projects I’ve ever encountered! The timeline I am working with is from February 1943 – the beginning of the New Orleans Opera House Association – to the early 2000′s. This collection is over flowing with unique photographs, hand painted or sketched set designs, amusing correspondence, quaint scrapbooks, and reel to reel recordings of performances as old at 1947!

This watercolor set design of a 1966 production of Carmen is one of many hand painted or sketched plans in the NOOA collection. It is most fascinating to hold up the planned set next to the realized black and white photo of the stage!

A single page from one of the NOOA Women's Opera Guild Scrapbooks. The twenty-fifth anniversary season of the NOOHA was all about the big names in opera. For this particularly spectacular performance, Tito Capobianco staged an inventive production of Les Contes d'Hoffmann, featuring Beverly Sills (pictured here), John Alexander, and Norman Treigle.

Arthur G. Cosenza

This is my Grandfather. He is one of my most favorite people and he was active with the New Orleans Opera Association for over thirty-five years. From the 1953-54 season as a supporting baritone role; through the 60′s, 70′s, and 80′s as stage and/or artistic director; and from 1998 until his death in 2005 he served as the Emeritus Director of the association. What a handsome guy! Though he always told me, “Everyone looks better when they’re younger.”

This project has only just begun. I am looking forward to another month in the Monroe Library researching, seeking, and finding…

Written by Student Worker and Intern, Gloria S. Cosenza.

Feminist Festival Faculty Display

In conjunction with the Women’s Resource Center, the Feminist Festival, and Women’s History Month, the Monroe Library is presenting a display of faculty works outside of the Living Room on the 1st floor of the library. Works included may focus on women and gender issues or may show the progress women have made in various academic, business, and artistic areas. The display includes books, journals, and select articles and will be available through March 31.

A full list of the materials included in the display is available here.

Exhibit: The Golden Ratio

Currently on view in the Library Living Room (Room 101):

The Golden Ratio
An Analogical Study of Creation
Linda Hexter, ‘16

From the artist’s statement:

My portfolio consists of eleven pairs of silver gelatin prints. The photo on the left in each pair displays an appearance of the Golden Ratio in divine creation. This includes the environment, animals, and the human body. The picture on the right presents an appearance of the Golden Ratio in man’s creation. This includes logo design, artwork, musical instruments, etc. I argue that the Golden Ratio appears in all of creation, and all of creation can be described by applying the ratio in the following manner:
creation/(divine creation)=ϕ=(divine creation)/(human creation)
I believe that the artist’s goal is to recreate nature’s divine beauty. Man’s limitations will allow only imperfect representations of the Golden Ratio to exist in art and architecture. This is why there is so much debate over whether or not the Golden Ratio exists in things like the Parthenon and the Mona Lisa. Humans attempt to use God’s mathematical tool to imitate natural beauty and leave our own mark of beauty in this world. This thesis is my attempt to create art with and about the Golden Ratio in order to shed light on our innate search for divine structure and beauty.

“Look on earth and sky and sea…they have forms because they have numbers: take these away, they will be nothing. And even human artificers, makers of all corporeal forms, have numbers in their art to which they fit their works; and they move hands and tools in the fashioning till that which is formed outside, carried back to the light of numbers which is within, so far as may be attains perfection, and through the mediating sense pleases the inner judge looking upon the heavenly numbers.”
–St. Augustine of Hippo

hexter

Media Traditions: Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation

Loyola University Special Collections & Archives proudly presents Media Traditions: Scrapbooking, Memory Archives, and Self-Presentation.

On view in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room, the exhibit draws correlations between memory archives of the past and contemporary modes of self-presentation.

Collections included within the exhibit are the Anthony Stanonis Travel Scrapbook and Diary CollectionBen C. Toledano New Orleans CollectionBasil Thompson Papers, and University Publications Collection.

We sincerely hope that you join us on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library this semester! Special Collections & Archives is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

New Norman Treigle exhibit

Treigle as Boito's Mefistofele

Dr. Valerie Goertzen’s Intro to Graduate Studies class has been hard at work this semester researching the life and career of Loyola graduate and local and international opera star Norman Treigle with archivists Trish Nugent and Elizabeth Kelly. The culmination of this project is the exhibit “The Golden Voice of New Orleans,” now available for viewing outside Special Collections & Archives on the third floor of the library.

The students in Intro to Graduate Studies did original research using the manuscript materials in the Norman Treigle Papers as well as secondary research using Brian Morgan’s biography Strange Child of Chaos: Norman Treigle.

There will be an Opening Reception Wednesday, 11 November 2015, 11:30 a.m., outside Special Collections, Monroe Library 3rd floor. All are welcome to join us for snacks.

Treigle studied at Loyola from 1949-1951 and went on to an illustrious career in North America and Europe. The exhibit explores Treigle’s career as well as his personal life through the variety of materials in his collection including journals, performance scores, costumes, images, correspondence, and more.

The exhibit will be on display through the end of the Fall semester. Thank you to the first-year Master of Music in Performance students for their great work on this project.

2015-11-4_Intro-to-Grad-Studies

Intro to Graduate Studies class with Special Collections staff

Bury the Hatchet screenings

Bury the Hatchet

The Monroe Library is a proud partner in the 2015-2016 Common Experience. The First Year Experience, with the library and Student Affairs, is instituting a “common experience” this year for incoming students. The FYE Common Experience Program begins the academic year with the screening of the film for all first-year students. The chosen film, Bury the Hatchet, follows three Mardi Gras Indians. The Mardi Gras Idians were identified as relating to the common experience because of the resilience within their own community, and the film also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of Katrina.

Continuous showings of the film will be shown for the Loyola community in Multimedia Room 2 in the library  Tue and Wed, 8/25 and 8/26.  The  showtimes are 9, 11, 1, and 3; the film runs for approximately 90 minutes.

To view the film trailer, click here: Bury the Hatchet trailer

The film will also be shown for all freshmen on Thu, 9/3 at 7pm in Roussel Hall, and additional showings for upper-class students and Family Weekend will also be scheduled soon.

For more information about the FYE Common Experience, click here. And to contribute to the Community and Resilience exhibit, click here.

Chin-Deep in Debris

Special Collections & Archives proudly presents Chin-Deep in Debris: A Katrina Retrospect One Decade Later!

Scheduled to coincide with the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Chin-Deep in Debris: A Katrina Retrospect One Decade Later is a multi-media exhibit highlighting Loyola University’s resilient response to the Category 3 storm and the destruction left in its wake.

Featured within the exhibit are photographs by Harold Baquet and select publications of The Maroon and The Wolf. In addition, a number of interviews of the Hurricane Katrina Oral Histories Collection are available for viewing.

To read further on the topic of Hurricane Katrina as it relates to Loyola University, full editions of The Maroon published during the Spring 2006 semester can be accessed online here. Likewise, The Wolf (2006) can be viewed in its entirety here.

We sincerely hope that you join us on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library this semester! Special Collections & Archives is open for research and quiet study Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 and Friday, 9:00-12:00.

Recent Acquisitions: Fine Press & Artists’ Books

Special Collections & Archives proudly presents Recent Acquisitions: Fine Press & Artists’ Books!

Curated to highlight several exciting new additions to our book collection, Recent Acquisitions: Fine Press & Artists’ Books features the work of five contemporary artisans who uniquely reimagine text, illustration, and “book” form to create engaging works of art.

The exhibition is on view in the Booth-Bricker Special Collections & Archives Reading Room through July 31, 2015.

As always, all are welcome to join us in Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 and Friday, 9:00-12:00.

Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Rachel, installing the exhibition.

Matt Shlian: Apophenia – An Exhibit

Matt Shlian: Apophenia

Biever Guest Lecture
Thursday, Feb. 6, 10 a.m.
Multimedia Room 2, J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library
Free admission

Opening Reception
Thursday, Feb. 6, 5 – 7 p.m.
Collins C. Diboll Art Gallery
Free admission

Matt Shlian, a paper engineer rooted in book arts, print media and design, will launch his new exhibit, Apophenia, at Loyola University New Orleans with a free, public lecture and opening reception. The Apophenia exhibit draws from Shlian’s series of the same name and refers to the artist’s perception of patterns or connections where none exists.

Through the lecture and exhibit, Shlian will explore how fine art and design inform one another, as well as how math and science relate to each other. Shlian allows his work to evolve on its own by beginning with an initial fold—a single action that then causes a transfer of energy to subsequent folds—that ultimately manifest in his drawings and three-dimensional forms.

Shlian also uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture, collaborating with scientists at the University of Michigan. While researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principles, he sees their inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration, according to Shlian.

He has presented and conducted workshops across the country, and commissioners of his work include several prestigious organizations and entities, such as Apple, Ghostly International, IMTEK, The United States Mint, The University of Michigan and Queen Rania of Jordan, among many others.

The artist’s lecture is part of the Biever Grant Lecture Series.
Both events are part of Loyola’s Montage Fine and Performing Arts Series.

Proust Exhibit


Jacques-Emile Blanche Portrait de Marcel Proust 1892

The Monroe Library is hosting an exhibit of posters celebrating the 100th anniversary of the publication of Marcel Proust’s Du côté de chez Swann (Swann’s Way), the first volume of À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time or Remembrance of Things Past). It can be seen in the Library Living Room on the first floor. A cooperative effort between the library and the Department of Languages and Cultures, the exhibit is part of a series created by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in France that the French Consulate in New Orleans gave to the teachers of French at Loyola University New Orleans.