Archive for the ‘Library Services’ Category

Off-campus database access may be interrupted

All access to the library’s electronic products outside of the university’s campus may be temporarily interrupted as of the afternoon of Friday, May 16, 2017.  This includes all article databases, electronic journals and electronic books. We are working with the university’s Information Technology service to restore access as soon as possible.  Please continue to check your database or other service, as it may be restored even while the library is closed.  Not affected are the university’s email, Blackboard,  LORA and other electronic and web-based services. We deeply regret this interruption.

Endangered Data Week

April 17-21 is Endangered Data Week, a new, annual, grassroots effort to…

  • raise awareness of threats to publicly available data of all kinds, across sectors and disciplines;
  • provide opportunities to explore the power dynamics of data creation, sharing, privacy, and retention;
  • build community capacity by teaching ways to make #EndangeredData more accessible and secure.

Sponsored by the Digital Library Federation with support from DataRefuge and CLIR, Endangered Data Week begins with a kick-off Twitter chat Monday, April 17th at 2pm Central; follow @CLIRDLF and use the hashtag #EndangeredData to join in. More related events are available on the event website, including some online. The week closes with a free webinar, Endangered Accountability: A DLF-Sponsored Webinar on FOIA, Government Data, and Transparency as 12pm Central on Friday, April 21.

So what can YOU do for Endangered Data Week?

  1. Read about Open Data, why it’s important, and why it’s currently being threatened
  2. Rescue some data! Get some friends together and host a workshop, or go solo on a data expedition.
  3. Tell stories: whatever you do, make sure to tell others about it!

Or, contact your friendly Digital Initiatives Librarian for more info.

Endangered Data Week is facilitated by a dedicated team of volunteers, including Brandon Locke and Jason A. Heppler, supported by the Digital Library Federation and in partnership with a new DLF interest group on Records Transparency/Accountability, led by Rachel Mattson. Additional supporters include DataRefuge and CLIR.

Catholic News Archive Demo

Please join the Monroe Library and Jennifer Younger from the Catholic Research Resources Alliance on Tuesday, April 18 at 10am in Seminar Room 4 of the library for a demo of The Catholic News Archive, a freely available digital library of 4,288 issues (and counting!) Catholic newspaper issues from different cities over multiple years. From the Catholic News Archive website,

“Historic Catholic newspapers are an important resource for scholars and researchers. The Catholic Research Resources Alliance is founded and funded by an impressive list of Universities (follow the link for a full list of member institutions).

However, university level uses are not the only extent of use for education. It is our passionate conviction that these historic newspapers can provide motivation for reading and discussion. They are a vast, diverse and primary source documents that can:

  • Connect students to recent history.
  • Make learning fun!
  • Offer flexibility and adaptability to all curriculum areas and grade levels.
  • Bridget the gap between the classroom and the “real’ world.
  • Give everyone something that’s interesting for them to ready (news, sports, weather, editorials, and comics).

Design lessons with relevant interactive digital activities to engage learners while creating historical awareness. Foster and facilitate independent learners using free and open source electronic resources to strengthen Catholic identity.”

Please join us to learn more about this valuable resource!

What: The Catholic News Archive demo

Where: Monroe Library Seminar Room 4 (2nd floor)

When: Tuesday, April 18 at 10am

What Fake News Is…and What It Isn’t

Was Nino Rubbed Out? I Read it at CVS!

Photo by Mike Licht

Well before Google and Facebook became common household words, there were already many different incarnations of what we’ve started calling “fake news.” Supermarket tabloids heralding dubious evidence for the existence of UFOs or the latest celebrity scandals are among fake news’ closest ancestors. The famous 1938 broadcast of director Orson Welles’ radio drama, War of the Worlds, fooled audiences into thinking Martians had invaded Earth. Tellingly, Welles revealed that the production company was motivated, in part, by a desire to teach the public about the dangers of uncritical acceptance of news on the new technology of radio (Schwartz). Indeed, as early as 1475, false reports of Jews abducting and drinking the blood of children have been used to agitate a credulous public against a common scapegoat (Soll).

More recently, several prominent contemporary journalists have been disciplined for lapses in journalistic integrity that include exaggerating for dramatic effect (NBC’s Brian Williams), giving undue credence to their informants (The New York Times’ Judith Miller), and outright fabrication (The New York Times’ Jayson Blair). These eyebrow-raising lapses by journalists working for highly reputable news outlets all defy a clear code of ethics for journalists.

Other variants in the “not quite news” category include segments on late night comedy shows such as The Daily Show or even Saturday Night Live. They may mention events documented by journalists following established procedures for verification of facts, but they clearly present themselves as humor, not journalism. We might also include in this category the nightly pundit shows that satisfy the 24-hour news cycle’s voracious appetite for content. Like late night comedy shows, pundits add commentary but can’t be properly described as producing reporting that meets journalistic standards.

Advertising also plays an important role in determining the content of our media whether we’re talking about print, television, or digital. Fake news’ defining characteristic is that its authors willingly report falsehoods to garner clicks on a story’s link. All this works in the interest of making money from web content through online advertising services such as Google’s AdSense. To add to the confusion, fake news websites may even have misleading URLs that mimic popular media sites like USAToday.com.co or WashingtonPost.com.co. Furthermore, the global nature of digital communication means that this is a problem both in the U.S. and internationally.

So what ISN’T fake news? When a major news organization reports on news that we don’t like or that is eventually proven incorrect, that does not qualify as “fake news” if it was based on credible sources. Similarly, if a news organization reports on a public leader who says something false, that is not fake news if the public leader actually said it. Major news organizations like CNN reported prior to the 2016 election that Hillary Clinton would win in a landslide. Were they reporting fake news? No, they were reporting the results of national polls — and polls can be wrong.

News media has its own bias as well. This infographic attempts to show the liberal and conservative leanings of many major news organizations, but we may also consider whether the infographic itself might also be biased. What do you think?

To help us get better at spotting fake news, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions has created a handy infographic that recommends several ways to evaluate the news we hear and see. In addition, non-partisan fact-checking websites like Snopes, Politifact, and FactCheck.org easily debunk hoaxes while also providing context on how a hoax or “fake news” report began. Finally, the Monroe Library is also here to help you sift through an increasingly unnavigable and often misleading media landscape. For more info, see our research guides on Fake News and Evaluating Web Pages, or contact your library liaison for help.

IFLA infographic based on FactCheck.org’s 2016 article “How to Spot Fake News” in PDF format

Fake News

fake-news

The news is full of reports of fake news these days. How can you spot fake news? What criteria or tools can help you? Who should you ask for help? The Monroe Library can provide you with the answers to these questions and more. For more info, see our research guides on Fake News and Evaluating Web Pages, or contact your library liaison for help.

Good luck, students!

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As the library bustles this week with students preparing their final papers and studying for exams, we at SCA want to wish our undergrads the best of luck in these last few days before the holiday break. Feel free to study with us in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room — we are always happy to assist with your research needs!

How do I log in?

* please note: changing your password in one place does not automatically change it everywhere *

WolfMail

Wolfpack ID: first initial, middle initial, first six letters of last name. You can also look it up in the “Find People” directory. It is the portion of your email address before the “@loyno.edu”.

Password: The password you are initially assigned follows this formula: first two letters of first name, last four digits of social security number. You can change your password here.

Blackboard

Username: Campus-wide ID (CWID). It is your 8-digit student id number. If you don’t know your CWID you can find it printed on the front of your Loyola ID card.

Password: same as WolfMail password.

LORA

Student Id (CWID): It is your 8-digit student id number. If you don’t know your CWID you can find it printed on the front of your Loyola ID card.

PIN: The default PIN is the first 2 letters of your first name and the last 4 digits of your social security number. You will be required to change the PIN when you login for the first time.

Library Online Resources

Username: Wolfpack ID. It is the portion of your email address before the “@loyno.edu”.

Password: same as WolfMail password.

* see troubleshooting guide for off-campus use of library resources.

ILLiad

Username: Choose anything you like, such as your name, abbreviations, or an alphanumeric code.
Password: Choose anything you like. Only you will know your password, and we cannot look it up. If you forget your password, you can use the Forgot Password page with your ILLiad user name.

* We recommend setting your username and password to be the same as your WolfMail username and password.

Library Computers

Username: Wolfpack ID. It is the portion of your email address before the “@loyno.edu”.

Password: same as WolfMail password.

Printing

Authentication: Wolfpack ID. It is the portion of your email address before the “@loyno.edu”.

<password>: same as WolfMail password.

Seminar 1 has a Touch Screen!

Did you know that the big TV in Library Seminar 1 (Room 129) is a touch screen? You can annotate your computer image, or create a whiteboard using your finger as the marker. You can also save whatever you create. There are lots more functions, too. Contact Media Services, mediasrv@loyno.edu or x7120, to set up a demo.

Open Access Week

Oct. 19 through 25 is Open Access Week around the world.  Open Access is a new model of scholarly publication based on sharing. Open materials can be distributed freely, and often revised and remixed freely.  Open Access resources include open journals, textbooks, quizzes, videos, and other materials.  Open textbooks mean little or no cost for students, adaptability and customizability, and access through print, browser, tablet and smart phone. Ask us or your teacher about using open textbooks at Loyola. Visit the Monroe Library’s Open Access guide and the Open Textbook Guide. Find more at http://www.openaccessweek.org.

October 1: #AskAnArchivist Day

October 1 is #AskAnArchivist Day! Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives staff are eager to respond to any and all questions you have about archives and archival work. Tag us at @MonroeLibLoyno and use #AskAnArchivist.

What questions can be asked?
No question is too silly . . .

  • What’s the craziest thing you’ve come across in your collections?
  • If your archives had a soundtrack, what songs would be on it?
  • What do archivists talk about around the water cooler?

. . . and no question is too practical!

  • What should I do to be sure that my emails won’t get lost?
  • I’ve got scads of digital images on my phone. How should I store them so I can access them later on?
  • How do you decide which items to keep and which to weed out from a collection?
  • As a teacher, how can I get my students more interested in using archives for projects?

For more information, see the news release from the Society of American Archivists.