Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

mayday SCANs001mayday SCANs002

mayday SCANs003 mayday SCANs004

We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

Extended Study Hours

Monroe Library will once again be open 24 hours during final exams. Our hours are:

24 hours from 11am Sunday, April 30 to 2am Saturday, May 6
(closed Saturday, May 6 2am-9am)

9am Saturday, May 6 to 2am Sunday, May 7
(closed Sunday, May 7 2am-9am)

24 hours from 9am Sunday, May 7 to 10pm Thursday, May 11
Friday, May 12 7:30am-6pm

Closed Saturday, May 13 and Sunday, May 14

We offer free coffee 12am-7am during our 24 hour periods. Please be sure
to pick up an Extended Study Pamphlet at Monroe Librarys Learning Commons Desk.

Good luck on all your final exams and projects!

Contact Emily Bufford (Learning Commons Coordinator) at 504-864-7118 or edbuffor@loyno.edu for more.

Happy Easter!

Happy Easter! To celebrate we are sharing images from the fully digitized Lise Mary Magdalen Tallant Scrapbook.  Lise Tallant (1888-1972) created this book of colorful images and greeting cards as a young girl, around 1900. Explore the book for yourself!

Media Services Helps Bring VP of Bolivia to Classroom

On Tuesday, March 14th, Bolivian Vice President Álvaro García Linera spoke with Professor Josefa Salmon’s Latin American Cinema Class via Skype in Bobet 332. Skype videoconferencing is familiar to many who use it to converse with family and friends.  Media Services’s wide angle webcamera enabled all the students to be seen in this large classroom. If you’d like to bring a noted speaker to your class or meeting via videoconference, please contact us for more information!

Read The Maroon’s article on this event.

Open Education Week 2017

Open Education Week celebrates the movement to create, share and use freely-available educational resources and tools among students, teachers and administrators.  Open educational materials (OEMs) can be freely obtained, edited or altered, and redistributed.  The week runs March 27 through 31, 2017.  Here at Loyola we support creation, distribution and use of OEMs, such as open textbooks, classroom presentations, videos, notes, question and quiz pools and more.  If you’ve read this far, then your awareness has been raised–goal achieved!  To learn more, contact us.

Hashtag: #openeducationwk

Flashback Friday!

Celebrate Flashback Friday with a little retro photo fun from our University Photographs Collection!

Title UP009593

Creator
Cresson, Russell G.

Contributors
Loyola University (New Orleans, La.)

Subject
Women
Loyola University (New Orleans, La.)
Blue Key Talent Night
Students

Description
Women perform on stilts

dancing stilts

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

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The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

Maroon

The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

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These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

American Chocolate Week: Walter Baker and Co.

Seeing as it is American Chocolate Week, we here at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives are offering a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones:

Irish Illuminated Manuscripts

To celebrate St. Patrick’s day, we are enjoying Special Collections & Archives’ copies of National Manuscripts of Ireland (DA905 .J27). Printed in four oversize volumes in 1874-1884, the books include beautiful reproductions of Irish illuminated manuscripts created by Sir Henry James using his photozincography process.

Enjoy! And come see the books for yourself in Special Collections & Archives.

Visiting Japanese Archivists

Special Collections & Archives recently hosted visiting archivists from Japan. (From L to R: Dr. Takahiro Sakaguchi, Ms. Izumi Hirano, Special Collections and Archives Coordinator Trish Nugent, and Dr. Yuko Matsuzaki.)

The group, now back home in Tokyo, was touring archival repositories across the United States to learn more about American archival practices and policies. We were very honored by their visit and their interest in our collections!