Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Hiring: Information Resources Specialist

The Monroe Library is hiring! Please visit the Loyola Human Resources Employment Opportunities page to apply for the Information Resources Specialist position.

Information Resources Specialist – University Library – Job posted 8/7/2017

The Information Resources Specialist manages print and electronic journals and packages, and manages books orders through vendor’s website. Develops monthly expenditure reports and usage statistics for annual review of information resources. Manages donations of books and music to the Monroe Library and the government documents collection. Works with others to maintain print collections and order replacements for missing and lost materials.

QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor’s Degree. Familiarity with library information resources. Computer skills in an online multi-tasking environment. Comfort with the use of technology for data analysis, including demonstrated proficiency with Microsoft Excel. Excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with colleagues and patrons. Ability to work productively in a team environment. Collaborative analytical and problem-solving skills and initiative. Project planning and implementation skills. High degree of accuracy in complex, detailed work.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Academic library experience. Supervisory experience, especially with college-age employees.

Dragons eat sun! Eclipse coming!

Dragons eat sun! Eclipse coming!

It’s not the coming of Daenerys Targaryen, but, weather permitting, a partial solar eclipse will be visible at Loyola University New Orleans on Monday, August 21, 2017. It begins at 11:57 am, is at its peak at 1:29 pm and will be over at 2:57 pm. All times are Central U.S. The eclipse will not be total in New Orleans, but about 80% of the sun will be obscured by the moon.

Remember not to look at the sun straight on without proper eye protection. Regular sunglasses are not enough to prevent eye damage. Be sure any glasses are ISO 12312-2 compliant. Or look opposite the sun for projected images through a pinhole camera, like a tiny hole in an index card, or among leaf shadows for a projected image.

If the weather’s cloudy, then watch the eclipse by livestream. Linda Hall Library 2017 solar eclipse guide.

Books in our collection:

Nordgren, Tyler E. (Tyler Eugene). Sun moon Earth : the history of solar eclipses from omens of doom to Einstein and exoplanets. Call number QB541 .N67 2016.

Mobberley, Martin. Total solar eclipses and how to observe them [electronic resource]. Call number E-BOOK. Publication date 2007.

Ways to Watch the 2017 solar eclipse – from NASA

Update!  August 15, 2017:  The Physics Department at Loyola will have two telescopes with solar filters stationed in the quad in front of the Monroe Building to view the eclipse safely.  They will also have a live, streaming feed on a large monitor in the Physics lab on the first floor of Monroe.  Contact Dr. Martin McHugh for more information.

And a one-hour course The Sun and the Total Eclipse of August 2017 from Dr. Douglas Duncan, University of Colorado at Boulder.

Born On This Day: Aldous Huxley

Born on July 26th, 1894, Aldous Huxley who is most famously known for his book Brave New World, was an award winning author of over 50 books of fiction and non-fiction, a screenwriter, poet, and late-life philosopher of spirituality.

450px-Aldous_Huxley

In celebration of his birthday, we offer a look at Essays New and Old (1926). Published by Chatto & Windus, the oldest continuous imprint at Penguin UK, this letterpress printing by The Florence Press was limited to 650 copies and is signed by the author.

IMG_2528

IMG_2526

This collection’s essays are a varied assortment covering such topics as pop music, advertising, Breughel, and travel.

IMG_2529

“The tourist who has no curiosity is doomed to boredom.”

File_001

Come peruse this item and some of the other interesting and unique collections housed within the Special Collections & Archives in Loyola University’s Monroe Library, Tuesday – Thursday from 9-4:30 (Summer Hours).

Here’s a little something extra, a BBC broadcast interview with Huxley from 1958, where he shares his thoughts on the art of writing.

Here is an additional animated interview created from a source interview conducted by Mike Wallace produced by PBS Digital Studios from May 18, 1958, where Huxley explains Technodictators.

Cornet Collection

One of the many digitized collections in Special Collections and Archives is the Joseph-Aurélien Cornet, FSC collection. The collection is comprised of Frère Cornet’s field notebooks and over 500 binders containing extensive research on Congolese art and culture. You can read a detailed description of the collection here. The collection is primarily in French and Congolese.

The following images are from Cahier (field notebook) 24, which covers Mission Bawoyo on March 8th to 12th, 1979, and Mission Mapangu ou Bashiliele on June 24th to 27th of the same year. The photographs below document a visit to the village of Muanda-Tende, and includes photos of house types, types of dance, and village residents.

You can view the collection online here at the Louisiana Digital Library. You can also check out some of the other digitized collections from Special Collections and Archives on our website.

During the summer session, we are open Tuesday-Thursday 9am-4:30pm, and Monday and Friday by appointment only.

“Letters Read” performance series debuts in New Orleans

lafcadio hearn

Loyola University Special Collections is proud to have provided research materials for a new performance series in New Orleans, Letters Read , which made its debut last night at a local independent book store, Crescent City Books. This series features local actors reading from “historically important personal letters vital to the culture of New Orleans.” Letters Read is the brainchild of a nationally-renowned expert in stationery engraving and New Orleans resident, Nancy Sharon Collins, and is sponsored by local arts organization, Antenna. Nancy, who occasionally teaches classes in letter-writing and stationery history was pleased to discover our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence Collection, which may be viewed in its digitized form here. Below is an excerpt from Nancy’s introduction to last night’s performance:

…The letters read tonight are by Patrick Lafcadio Hearn, written during his 1886 summer on Grand Isle, Louisiana to mentor and editor Page Baker…Hearn was a writer, journalist, wanderer and urbane observer and commentator of human civilization. He moved to New Orleans the year Reconstruction ended and lived here for a decade. Hearn is credited with putting New Orleans on the map as a cultural destination. As with many, he loved our fair city.

The Grand Isle letters provide an unedited glimpse into a small, highly personal corner of Hearn’s New Orleans experience, composed of language and thoughts that may offend.

Hearn’s Grand Isle letters were chosen for the first Letters Read event because of their content. By bringing Hearn’s inner-most thoughts to a wider audience we can, perhaps, understand what brings a man to express feelings of this kind…

-Nancy Sharon Collins

The reading of the letters was preceded by a brief talk by social psychologist, Dr. Adrienne McFaul, who encouraged the audience to consider what it means to dehumanize another human being. Because of the anti-Semitic language in some of Hearn’s letters, contextualization and critical thinking were key to this innovative performance concept, which gives striking insight into the letters’ author and illustrates the complexities and contradictions of human thought processes and prejudices.

We at Loyola SC&A look forward to future iterations of this series and congratulate Nancy on the debut of Letters Read! You can find Nancy’s book, The Complete Engraver, here.

2016-2017 Student Research Competition Winners

Monroe Library is happy to announce the winners of its 2016-2017 Student Research Awards! The following are the awardees in four categories:

1. Graduate Student Research: Kathryn Domyan (Master of Music in Performance)
2. Senior Capstone/Thesis Research (tie):
Molly Mulroy (English, Writing)
Adam Stagg (Asian Studies)
3. Junior/Senior Research: Marley Duet (English)
4. Freshman/Sophomore Research: Elizabeth Barbour (English)

Each received a $200 award for the superlative and innovative research projects submitted. Monroe Library holds the contest each spring and is happy to honor the outstanding research conducted at Loyola. Congratulations to all five student scholars!

Dance of the Flyers AKA Voladores ‘Flying Men’

Today in celebration of Cinco De Mayo, we bring you an excerpt of the Mexican Jesuit Francesco Saverio Clavigero’s book, The history of Mexico. Collected from Spanish and Mexican historians, from manuscripts and ancient paintings of the Indians. Illustrated by Charts and other copper plates. To which are added, critical dissertations on the land, the animals, and inhabitants of Mexico.

This book is available for research M-F 9-4:30 and is part of our Archives & Special Collections as well as available electronically as part of the Internet Archive.

I chose to highlight pages 402 through 404 from Volume 1 that give a description of the mesoamerican ritual called the Dance of the Flyers AKA Pole Flying AKA Ceremony of the Voladores (Flying Men). The reason I chose to highlight this section is because I had the opportunity to see a performance of this ritual recently outside of the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City.

This dance has been awarded a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity distinction and is described as follows on their website:

“The ritual ceremony of the Voladores (‘flying men’) is a fertility dance performed by several ethnic groups in Mexico and Central America, especially the Totonac people in the eastern state of Veracruz, to express respect for and harmony with the natural and spiritual worlds. During the ceremony, four young men climb a wooden pole eighteen to forty metres high, freshly cut from the forest with the forgiveness of the mountain god. A fifth man, the Caporal, stands on a platform atop the pole, takes up his flute and small drum and plays songs dedicated to the sun, the four winds and each of the cardinal directions. After this invocation, the others fling themselves off the platform ‘into the void’. Tied to the platform with long ropes, they hang from it as it spins, twirling to mimic the motions of flight and gradually lowering themselves to the ground. Every variant of the dance brings to life the myth of the birth of the universe, so that the ritual ceremony of the Voladores expresses the worldview and values of the community, facilitates communication with the gods and invites prosperity. For the dancers themselves and the many others who participate in the spirituality of the ritual as observers, it encourages pride in and respect for one’s cultural heritage and identity.”

Here is part of Clavigero’s description of the ritual:

File_002

And the copper plate illustration of the ritual that faces page 4o2:

File_003

As an added bonus, here is a short video I shot on my phone while experiencing the performance in February:

Russell Gerard Cresson, 1921 – 2017

Russell Gerard Cresson, for 40-years the official photographer of Loyola, passed away last month on April 23rd at the age of 96.

From 1949 until 1987, Cresson (also an alumnus of the University), documented Loyola’s campus, faculty, staff, students, and events. Much of this record is in our Loyola University Photographs Collection. Not all of our Cresson images have been digitized, but you can view the 8230 currently available through the Louisiana Digital Library.

We here in the Special Collections & Archives extend our deepest sympathies to Cresson’s family and friends and offer our sincere gratitude for his years of dedication to documenting the life of Loyola University.

UP005720

Wolf Yearbook picture editor Bob Reso (left) with University photographer Russ Cresson (right)

Collection Spotlight: May Day Edition

Today is May Day!

May Day (with its celebratory Maypole Dance) can be considered a day to celebrate spring in the northern hemisphere, or possibly known as a neopagan holiday (Beltane) that celebrates the time between the spring equinox and summer solstice. May Day is also otherwise known as International Workers’ Day; a day of celebration, protest, labor strikes, and commemorations of the organized labor movement.

In the context of May Day’s celebration of labor organization, we are shining our collection spotlight on some images from our New Orleans Social Justice and Activism, 1980s-1990s collection.

This collection consists primarily of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991. The collection includes pamphlets and newsletters of various coalitions in opposition to David Duke’s 1990 gubernatorial campaign, contemporary news clippings, and reference materials on Duke and white supremacy. The collection also contains organizing materials in opposition to The Gulf War and local journals relative to labor parties, unions, and social justice, including Central American News, Bayou Worker, Second Line, Crescent City Green Quarterly, and Brad Ott’s Avant!, Dialogue, and Café Progresso. The papers of The Gary Modenbach Social Aid and Pleasure Club are also included.

Below you will find some images from Series I: Social Justice Literature, 1983-2002, a series that includes a wide array of New Orleans’ political action journals, newsletters, flyers and mailers concerning anti-racism, worker’s rights, environmental health, the Green Party, Central American solidarity, nuclear disarmament, and anti-David Duke coalitions.

Folder 14 of this series contains labor and environment-focused flyers, ephemera, and other miscellanea and is where the originals below are located.

mayday SCANs001mayday SCANs002

mayday SCANs003 mayday SCANs004

We hope you enjoyed this sample of the New Orleans Social Justice and Activism collection and follow these links to other blog posts that highlight our Social Justice collections.

These collections are available for research M-F 9-4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives at Loyola University New Orleans.

Here’s a bittersweet a song of an oft-unemployed union worker as an added Lagniappe; The Kinks’ “Get Back In The Line.”

Spring 2017 Extended Study Hours

Spring 2017 Extended Study has come and gone.

Monroe Library will once again be open 24 hours during final exams. Our hours are:

24 hours from 11am Sunday, April 30 to 2am Saturday, May 6
(closed Saturday, May 6 2am-9am)

9am Saturday, May 6 to 2am Sunday, May 7
(closed Sunday, May 7 2am-9am)

24 hours from 9am Sunday, May 7 to 10pm Thursday, May 11
Friday, May 12 7:30am-6pm

Closed Saturday, May 13 and Sunday, May 14

We offer free coffee 12am-7am during our 24 hour periods. Please be sure
to pick up an Extended Study Pamphlet at Monroe Librarys Learning Commons Desk.

Good luck on all your final exams and projects!

Contact Emily Bufford (Learning Commons Coordinator) at 504-864-7118 or edbuffor@loyno.edu for more.