Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Loup Garou 1999

Tommorow,  Loyola hosts Wale for the traditional spring concert series, Loup Garou! Back in 1999, Loyola hosted its 2nd Loup Garou with a performance by RUN DMC. The 1999 Loup Garou was hosted on October 24th in the Palm Court  and student tickets were $7. Below is an essay written by a Loyola student, Becky Dickinson, who was on the committee for the concert. Dickinson describes how much fun planning the concert was. Additionally,  she describes the amazing opportunity she had to meet RUN DMC and interview them. Most importantly, she notes the emphasis RUN DMC placed on the importance of educating people on the art of rap in hopes that society will recognize it as a respectable music form. Moreover, RUN DMC argues that rap music can have a positive influence on society. Maybe some of you will be lucky enough to meet Wale at the concert tomorrow, at 8pm, and disscuss the importance of rap music! You never know!

RUN DMC

RUN DMC

Click image to open larger view

RUN DMC

Click image to open larger view

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

We’re Hiring! PT Learning Commons & Stacks Assistant

The Monroe Library seeks a Part-time Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant who will provide basic circulation, reference, and technology assistance in an active learner-centered environment. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is responsible for conducting collection inventory and stacks maintenance. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is also responsible for opening the library Monday through Friday.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree or two years of college and two years of library experience; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with library users and colleagues; excellent customer services skills; skills and experience in the use of computer applications for word processing, scanning, printing, spreadsheets; comfort with the use of technology for data analysis; collaborative problem-solving skills and initiative with a high degree of accuracy in complex, detailed work.

Physical Requirements: Access upper library shelves with a step stool and bend to lower shelves; lift and carry equipment, supplies, or materials weighing up to 30 lbs; push a fully loaded, wheeled, book cart, up to 100 lbs.; sustain long periods of standing/walking back and forth; bend, stoop, and reach equipment and materials.

For info on how to apply, see: http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities

The New Orleans Water Cure

Sometimes when browsing the books in our Special Collections & Archives a title just beckons you to pluck it from the shelf.

Today it was a volume entitled New Orleans Water Cure, by Father François Rougé. Written around 1887, this book outlines and explains how to use Bavarian priest Sebastian Kneipp’s, “Water Cure” to treat illnesses.

Sebastian Kneipp

Kneipp’s Water Cure was by no means exclusive to New Orleans, nor was it created here. The “Kneipp Cure” was essentially Kneipp’s take on hydrotherapy combined with naturopathic medicine.

The volume pits Kneipp’s hydrotherapy against the use of medicines to treat illness and outlines the processes involved in seeking and administering the cure.

Here is an excerpt illustrating the anti-medicine stance of the Kneipp Water Cure:

One of the more whimsical seeming requirements (part of Kneipp’s “hardening process”) was walking in the dew barefoot.  This actually became a (somewhat ridiculed) fad in Central Park in New York City, where gentlemen and ladies were seen walking barefoot in the morning dew or winter snow.

Kneipp’s methods (called Kneippism) combine hydrotherapy with diet, exercise, and herbal medicine. He was the most famous nature doctor of his time whose clients included Archduke Franz Ferdinand and Pope Leo XIII.

Franz Ferdinand

Pope Leo XIII

The Kneipp Water Cure located in New Orleans opened to the public on July 11th, 1896  in the area of Flood St. and Levee St. (Peters St. and Flood St.), and was initially run by Father Rougé, the author of book.

Daily Picayune advertisement from July, 31, 1898

Above is an image of the New Orleans Kneipp Water Cure (Cure D’Eau) from around 1905-1910. (Note the large water tower.)

Kneippism still flourishes today with a popular line of Kneipp naturopathic products available as well as locations where you can undergo Kneipp derived therapies.

Please feel free to come to visit the Special Collections & Archives to check out this book in our reading room Monday through Thursday 9:00am to 4:30pm.

Now Hiring: Learning Technologies Developers

Learning Technologies Developer – University Library (2 openings)

The Learning Technologies Developer will plan, create, implement, and support media and web content to enhance student and faculty learning. This position is responsible for the successful implementation and enhancement of digital content affiliated with the library’s Blackboard, teaching, and learning initiatives, as well as backend maintenance and support for content delivery and management systems.

The Learning Technologies Developer works to enhance how faculty and students utilize technology and online learning tools to increase active learning, refine critical thinking and communications skills, and develop information and media fluencies. Oversee media and application production services that support teaching and learning at Loyola.

Qualifications: Completion of an undergraduate degree required; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with faculty, staff, students and others; ability to work productively in a team environment; excellent organizational and project management skills; must have in depth knowledge of computer operating systems, web browsers; demonstrated proficiency with MS Office, video and audio editing, webpage creation, and other applications such as Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Final Cut, etc.; experience with object-oriented programming and/or scripting languages; experience producing digital or web-based instructional materials and streaming media; experience working in an academic environment preferred; experience developing and conducting training sessions preferred; experience with Adobe Flash, web programming languages such as CSS & XML, and Blackboard or other LMS (Learning Management System(s).

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.

Now hiring: Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Part Time

Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Part Time – University Library

The Special Collections & Archives Assistant collaborates with library faculty and staff in Special Collections & Archives duties, including reference assistance, processing of collections, digitization, exhibit preparation, and preservation activities on a part-time basis. The ideal candidate will demonstrate skills in project management, customer-focused service, team collaboration, and have an interest in archival description and digitization. The position is temporary, and expires in December 2015.

Qualifications: B.A. degree, or equivalent; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with colleagues and patrons; ability to work productively in a team environment; computer skills in an online, multi-tasking environment; high degree of accuracy and focus concerning complex, detailed work; collaborative and creative problem-solving ability; ability to manage multiple projects in a time sensitive environment.

Highly desirable qualifications include at least two years of library or archival experience and/or MLS; experience working in an academic library; experience with digitization and/or exhibit preparation; experience with online collection management system, such as ARCHON.

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.

New Orleans Traffic: Then and Now

Our how-to today is inspired by A traffic survey of New Orleans metropolitan area, 1944-1945. This report located in the stacks of our Special Collections & Archives was produced in a time before I-10 existed and when the main airport for New Orleans was located on Lake Pontchartrain.

Be you on foot, driving a car, biking or taking a city bus… Traffic (and getting stuck in it), is (and was) inevitable. Whether it’s the junction of I-10 and 90 around the New Orleans landmark, the Superdome, trying to get ANYWHERE during Mardi Gras or navigating the overcrowding of cars and shoppers on Magazine Street…. Everybody gets stuck in traffic.

These days we have traffic information available on our smartphones that automatically re-route us based on real-time geolocation data. In 1944,  these were the results of the timely endeavor of gathering and mapping traffic patterns…

Versus the ease of getting the flow of traffic this morning…

So, how did traffic flow in 1944 New Orleans?

Here is what car traffic looked like…

And transit based traffic…

Currently, a section of I-10 called the Claiborne Expressway is on a list of Freeways Without Futures with active proposals seeking its removal.

This area was once a thriving commercial area and greenbelt that became decentralized through the bisecting of the neighborhood by the interstate.

“Claiborne Avenue: Past, Present, and Future” from Congress for the New Urbanism on Vimeo.

Good luck getting around and a here’s a lagniappe of Ringo Star making sure you take the time to stop and smell the roses!

A traffic survey of New Orleans metropolitan area, 1944-1945 is available for viewing at the Special Collections and Archives, Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30.

21st Amendment Anniversary

This Saturday, December 6, marks the 81st anniversary of the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, which repealed the nationwide prohibition on alcohol.

Image from the National Archives

Beneath the headline “Return of Liquor Taken Quietly by City, Celebrants,” the Times Picayune reported:

Formal prohibition repeal became effective in New Orleans Tuesday night in a surprisingly unobtrusive manner.

A number of private or semi-private “repeal” celebrations were held in homes and clubs, but a glimpse into one of this city’s more popular saloons or larger restaurants Tuesday night would scarcely have indicated that the 13-year drought was just ended.

It was scarcely mentioned in barroom conversation that repeal, one of the most widely discussed questions in American during the past few years, had at last become a fact. An occasional, casual, “Well, Joe, It’s legal now,” was all that as usually heard.

The nonchalant tone of repeal extended to the Loyola Maroon as well. A review of the archived issues shows that the repeal was not mentioned in the student newspaper at all immediately after it’s passage.

In contrast to the calm repeal of prohibition, the passage of the Eighteenth amendment, banning the sale of alcohol in 1919, was a fraught one. Opposing Views: The Battle Among Louisiana’s Urban Newspapers During the Ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment, held in Special Collections and Archives, documents the public battle waged across the state on the issue. Can you guess which side the New Orleans press supported?

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Cookies!

Keep your eyes open for pop-up cookie parties in the library starting on December 8th!

Whitfield and the Lomaxes

John and Alan Lomax’s musical recordings of their trip to Southern Louisiana in 1934 gathering songs for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress have recently been made available online. This is a fascinating website that is entertaining as well as a user-friendly research tool. The attractive database is searchable by song indexes, interactive maps, as well as by performers’ names and parishes.

While looking around in our collections for related material, I came across a volume written by Irènè Thérèse Whitfield who collaborated with the Lomaxes during their research in Southern Louisiana.

Louisiana French Folk Songs published in 1939 was Irènè Thérèse Whitfield master’s thesis while studying at LSU. In 1934 during Irene’s research, her dean informed her of the Lomaxes (Alan was only 18 at the time) project and in turn helped establish a reciprocal relationship that benefited everyone involved. This association significantly privileged Whitfield in the successful completion of her groundbreaking book through the use of the sound recordings Lomax had made on a 300-pound portable recorder during their expeditions. While Irene’s local knowledge aided the Lomaxes in their work.

Picture of the recording equipment in the trunk of John Lomax’s car.

Here are a few selections found on the www.lomax1923.com website as well as in Whitfield’s book (click on the link or the index card to have a listen).

Jolie Blonde, from page 81.

Madame Fardueil, from page 86

Je veux me marier, from page 87

J’ai passé devant ta porte, from page 88

There is also a film by Alan Lomax about the culture of the bayous of Louisiana that is available for viewing in its entirety on Folkstreams: A National Preserve of Documentary Films about American Roots Cultures called Cajun Country (1991).

Here is the trailer for Cajun Country via YouTube

A new study of the 1934 trip Traditional music in coastal Louisiana: the 1934 Lomax recordings by Joshua Clegg Caffery (who is also the author of www.lomax1934.com/find the time to watch the lecture at the bottom of the page – it’s fascinating) was recently published and will soon be available for checkout from the Monroe Library.

In the meantime, these other materials related to Lousiana music and folk culture are currently available at Monroe Library for further research:

Alan Lomax: selected writings, 1934-1997

Cajun and Creole music 1934 [sound recording]: the Lomax recordings

Acadian folk songs by Whitfield, Irène Thérèse

Accordions, fiddles, two step & swing: a Cajun music reader

Buying the wind: regional folklore in the United States

Louisiana French folk songs is available for research Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30 at the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives

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Additional online resources used:

Cajun Folklife, by Ryan Brasseaux

Lomax in Louisiana: Trials and Triumph, by Barry Jean Ancelet

A History of Folklife Research in Louisiana, by  Frank de Caro

Loyola students’ values: 1984

Thirty years ago this week The Maroon reported on a survey conducted by renowned sociologist and Loyola faculty member Joseph Fichter, SJ, measuring Loyola students stance on moral and social issues.

The article begins:

According to a recent survey, 74 percent of the Loyola student body say cheating on an exam or term paper is always wrong, while only 15 percent condemn premarital sex. Sixty-two percent of the students surveyed approve a nuclear weapons freeze, while only 28 percent support abolishing capital punishment. These and other enlightening statistics come from a survey of Loyola undergraduates’ moral and social values distributed last spring.

Reportedly the first survey of it’s kind of Loyola, Fr. Fichter examined Loyola students’ attitudes on a variety of subjects, and how these attitudes may change over the course of their college careers. The results of the survey were published in 1984 as Loyola Students and Their Values.

The Maroon noted:

Fichter’s report on the survey offers an interesting analysis. He notes that freshmen are much more likely to reflect Loyola’s promoted moral and social values than seniors. This is to be expected as seniors become more independent and critical in their thinking, for traditionally a loss of idealism accompanies a loss of youth, according to Fichter.

Also noted is that Loyola’s statistics reinforce research which shows women to be more socially sensitive and willing to express religious beliefs than men are.

Fichter also points out that students in Catholic universities have been affected by changes in the Roman Catholic Church in the aftermath of the Second Vatican Council.

“In the area of religion and spirituality among Catholics we have seen a decline in idealism, a loss of self-confidence, an erosion of authority, and a growth in permissiveness that seems unrelated to traditional ethical principles,” Fichter said.

If you would like to learn more about Fr. Fichter’s work, his many published works are available in he library,  including Loyola Students and Their Values, The rehabilitation of clergy alcoholics : ardent spirits subdued and Who gets arrested in New Orleans? A research study of police arrests in 1962. In addition, Fr. Fichter’s papers are held in Special Collections and Archives and are publicly available for research.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.