Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

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The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

Maroon

The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

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These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

American Chocolate Week: Walter Baker and Co.

Seeing as it is American Chocolate Week, we here at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives are offering a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones:

Irish Illuminated Manuscripts

To celebrate St. Patrick’s day, we are enjoying Special Collections & Archives’ copies of National Manuscripts of Ireland (DA905 .J27). Printed in four oversize volumes in 1874-1884, the books include beautiful reproductions of Irish illuminated manuscripts created by Sir Henry James using his photozincography process.

Enjoy! And come see the books for yourself in Special Collections & Archives.

Visiting Japanese Archivists

Special Collections & Archives recently hosted visiting archivists from Japan. (From L to R: Dr. Takahiro Sakaguchi, Ms. Izumi Hirano, Special Collections and Archives Coordinator Trish Nugent, and Dr. Yuko Matsuzaki.)

The group, now back home in Tokyo, was touring archival repositories across the United States to learn more about American archival practices and policies. We were very honored by their visit and their interest in our collections!

A Class about the Bullet Journal System

The phenomenon of BuJo has come to Loyola, and Monroe Library is here to teach you all about it. BuJo stands for Bullet Journal, a way to organize via paper and pen. But it’s much more than organization: it’s a way to plan for the future, keep track of what you’ve done, and get creative. Using a specialized bullet system as its base, the bullet journal helps keep everything together and on track. And it is highly customizable!

Come find out why BuJo is a buzz-worthy word in the Library Living Room from 5pm-6pm on the First Day of Spring, March 20.

The first ten people to register get a free starter Bullet Journal! Supplies like colorful pens, rulers, and practice paper will be provided for everyone.

Hosted by Emily Bufford, Learning Commons Coordinator. Email Emily at EDBuffor@loyno.edu to register.

Celebrating Black History Month

Celebrating Black History Month

In his 1983 landmark study of national identity, Imagined Communities, Benedict Anderson writes that people are united by the fact that they’ve forgotten the same things. It is, Anderson asserts, the shared act of common remembering that draws people together (191-2). While there are many ways that we commemorate Black History Month, the library’s place as the repository of books and of memory itself positions it as a key site of imagined community for this shared remembering. In the interest of fostering such an act of communal memory, Monroe Library has assembled displays of our print and digital holdings in black history and culture in the United States.

Located at the LC desk, our print display features the work of black artists and thinkers from a wide range of disciplines: poetry, drama, music, fiction, visual arts, autobiography, and social commentary. We’ve assembled a chorus of voices, visions, and viewpoints that includes the earliest slave narratives, the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance, the theater of the Black Arts movement, and the contemporary cultural critique of bell hooks and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Feel free to stop by and check out a book from our display. Or, if you don’t see what you’re looking for, just ask a librarian.

If you’re interested in browsing our online, digital collections, be sure to check out our research guide – especially useful for class projects! The guide collects together a large range of digital materials on black culture, art, and history, including vintage and contemporary newspapers, print and electronic encyclopedias, ebooks, music, and movies.

- Victoria Elmwood

Work Cited

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. New York: Verso, 2006.

Mardi Gras Break

Even though Monroe Library is closed Saturday February 25th through Wednesday March 1st in celebration of Mardi Gras, that doesn’t mean you can’t do some learning about Fat Tuesday right here on our website.  Check out the links below to see some past blog posts about the colorful history of Mardi Gras in New Orleans. The library will re-open Thursday March 2nd and Friday March 3rd from 8am-6pm, and resume regular hours Saturday March 4th. We hope you have a wonderful and safe Mardi Gras season!

Blog posts about our Mardi Gras collections:

Mardi Gras at Loyola, 1983

The Colors of Carnival

How To Tuesday: King’s Cake Recipe

Mardi Gras Memories

Mardi Gras Literature

It’s Carnival Season!

Mardi Gras Coloring Pages

#ColorOurCollections

More Mardi Gras Archives

Collection Spotlight: Carnival

Welcome Back, Wolf Pack!

Happy Valentines Day! From LOYNO SCA!

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY!

Thompson, Basil. Childhood Scrapbook, circa 1900. Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4 Folder 4, Special Collections and Archives, Loyola University New Orleans. http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16313coll91, Louisiana Digital Library

Thompson, Basil. Childhood Scrapbook, circa 1900. Basil Thompson Papers, Box 4 Folder 4, Special Collections and Archives, Loyola University New Orleans. http://cdm16313.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16313coll91, Louisiana Digital Library

Women’s March Archive at SCA

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HAPPY NATIONAL PIE DAY!

Celebrate National Pie Day via the Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council Cookbook.

A Book of favorite recipes, compiled by Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council, 1979.

A Book of favorite recipes, compiled by Jefferson Parish Extension Homemakers Council.

Take a look at our TUMBLR for larger images of the recipe text, or view the book while visiting the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.