Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

New Equipment!

Media Services is happy to announce some brand-new equipment, ready to be used!

We are very excited to add to our inventory two new DSLR cameras (CANON t5i EOS 700D) and external microphones (VideoMic), for any high-quality photography or video needs you may have. These cameras also include two lenses: an 18-55 mm lens and 55-250 mm telephoto lens. These new cameras have the capacity to shoot incredible video, and are equipped with an audio input that can be used with an external microphone–such as lavalier microphones–or our brand new VideoMic microphones. This high-powered equipment is sure to make your photography reach new heights and your film projects pop!

Media Services has also expanded into more adventurous territory, adding to our inventory a GoPro Hero. This GoPro can shoot in four modes: Video, Photo, Burst (which takes ten pictures over two seconds), and Time-Lapse (which takes a picture every half-second). It is waterproof and boasts super stats like 1080p high-definition video capture. Wherever life takes you, take our GoPro!

We are also pleased to announce a new portable wireless speaker. Battery-operated, this device can be used for presentations, and comes with one wireless handheld microphone and one lapel microphone. It can also be used for any musical needs, and can connect to any device with a mini-jack or over Bluetooth! It is lightweight and portable, but packs a serious auditory punch!

By visiting the Monroe Library website at library.loyno.edu and following the “Reserve A/V Equipment” link under the Frequently Used banner, students and faculty are welcome to come have a look and reserve these exciting new items and much more!  Remember, we need 2 working days lead time for all equipment reservations!

#PageFrights

A dance with a skeleton or a skeleton dance?

This is the time of year to ponder such choices and this Bio Grad Student opted for the prior.

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And… here is a classic cartoon Skeleton Dance as a lagniappe:

This is part of #PageFrights, a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

Faculty Spotlight: Jim Hobbs

Monroe Library’s Online Services Coordinator, Jim Hobbs, was selected to receive the LOUIS Discussion List Guru Award for 2016! Jim was nominated by his peers due to his efforts and leadership in the areas of collection development and e-resources. The Louisiana Library Network (LOUIS) will present the award at the LOUIS Users Conference in Baton Rouge on October 5th to recognize him for fostering and moderating discussions on the LER-L Discussion List for Louisiana university librarians.

October 5: #AskAnArchivist day!

October 5 is #AskAnArchivist Day! Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives staff are eager to respond to any and all questions you have about archives and archival work. Tag us on Twitter at @MonroeLibLoyno and use #AskAnArchivist.

What questions can be asked?
No question is too silly . . .

  • What’s the craziest thing you’ve come across in your collections?
  • If your archives had a soundtrack, what songs would be on it?
  • What do archivists talk about around the water cooler?

. . . and no question is too practical!

  • What should I do to be sure that my emails won’t get lost?
  • I’ve got scads of digital images on my phone. How should I store them so I can access them later on?
  • How do you decide which items to keep and which to weed out from a collection?
  • As a teacher, how can I get my students more interested in using archives for projects?

For more information, see the news release from the Society of American Archivists and look at our Storify from last year’s #AskAnArchivist.

SCA Celebrates #PageFrights In October

This month Special Collections & Archives will be participating in #PageFrights.

What is Page Frights?

All is revealed via the Page Frights website @ pagefrights.org:

“HALLOWEEN, LIBRARY & ARCHIVES-STYLE.

Welcome to Page Frights, a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

This October, libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions around the world are sharing spooky, creepy, and otherwise frightening and/or Halloween-related books and images from their collections on social media using the hashtag #PageFrights. Follow along and join the conversation on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr, and other social media sites.”


Our first installment is from the 1969 Wolf yearbook (digitized and available online through Internet Archive), picturing 2 undergraduates playing with an Ouija board.

Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 10.34.18 AM

Look for more #PageFrights all throughout October!

And please come visit the Special Collections & Archives M-F from 9-4:30, located on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Letterpress in the Archives: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana” 1916

CitizensBank_spread

There is no reason to doubt that it was the Citizens’ Bank that gave the name “Dixie” to the South. The origin of that word has never been positively determined, but the tradition that gives the credit to the Citizens’ Bank is certainly stronger than any of the other claims advanced. When the country was flooded with wild-cat money and counterfeiting was so common as to cast suspicion on nearly every species of paper money, the notes of this bank commanded respect throughout the great valley, and, in fact, everywhere in the country, and its ten-dollar notes were the standard of value. These notes in ante-bellum days were printed in the French language, and instead of bearing the numeral in English, they bore the French word “dix.” It became common when one was passing down the great river to trade at the Southern metropolis for him to say that he was going South to acquire some dixes. Thus it happened that the lower stretches of the river became known as the land of the dixies, or “Dixie land.”

“Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana”, New Orleans, 1916, p. 11

As the new project assistant in Special Collections & Archives here at Loyola, I have thoroughly enjoyed perusing the stacks as I better acquaint myself with the collection. Since my academic background is in printmaking and book arts, I naturally gravitate towards the rare books on our shelves, and I am continuously fascinated by the bindings and material qualities of these old books. Today I would like to share with you this small letterpress-printed pamphlet: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana,” New Orleans, 1916.

A modest book at first glance, “Citizens’ Bank..” is a lovely example of early twentieth century letterpress-printing. Although there is no press information on the title page of this pamphlet, there are clues in the tactile quality of the book that reveal how it was printed and what materials were used. It is sewn with a silky cord, and a knot tied on the spine of the book allows the pamphlet to close flat.  It is composed of a high-quality mould-made paper, which is evident in the paper’s strong, visible fibers and deckled edge, as well as watermarks that are visible when certain pages are held up to bright light. If you were to lightly brush your finger along the text of this book, you’d notice a texture, an imprint, which occurs because of the amount of pressure applied in the printing process. At close inspection you’d see that some of the text is over-inked in places, which creates a small puddle around individual letters. I could go on and on about the letterpress process, but instead I’ll refer you to this resource if you’d like to learn more.

This book was letterpress printed on high quality paper because its materials were likely intended to reflect the history of a wealthy institution: the Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana. Its brief 31 pages outline the history of the bank, and the book serves as a well-crafted advertisement for the financial institution. You can view more images of this book (and many more) on our tumblr, or come in for a visit on the third floor of Monroe Library!

Constitution Day Sept. 17

In preparation for Constitution Day, Bea Calvert (Information Resources and Government Documents Librarian) distributed Pocket Constitutions from the U.S. Government Publishing Office to Professor Chris Screen’s First Year Seminar, Investigating the Constitution.

View the Constitution Day Research Guide for more resources!

Egyptian Vulture :: John Gould’s Birds of Great Britain

Egyptian_Vulture

John Gould, a British zoologist active throughout the mid-19th century, is known chiefly for the over 3000 hand colored lithographs he produced throughout his career. The first volume of one of his most successful publications, The Birds of Great Britain, can be found in Special Collections & Archives at Loyola’s Monroe Library.

Position Announcement

Position Announcement: Assistant to the Dean of Libraries

The Assistant to the Dean of Libraries ensures that all functions of the Dean’s Office are performed efficiently and effectively. The Assistant to the Dean functions as office manager and assists the Dean in administrative functions of the library, including personnel, budgeting, planning, assessment, facilities management, fundraising and outreach.

Qualifications: High school diploma or GED required; college degree preferred; a minimum of three years administrative experience required; ability to operate standard office equipment and routine administrative functions including word processing, filing, and reports; budget management experience; ability to handle financial information with accuracy and strong analytical reasoning; strong organizational and planning skills; ability to plan and organize individual and group work to effectively meet desired outcomes; knowledge of software packages including Word and Excel; technological savvy and motivated to learn new tools and applications; excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills; ability to develop friendly and productive working relationships; ability to maintain and respect confidential information required. Additional preferred qualifications include: formal bookkeeping and/or accountancy training; experience using financial record systems; library work experience; file management experience; familiarity with academic library operations; familiarity with fundraising and outreach; and supervisory experience desired.

Work schedule: Monday-Friday; 30 hours per week.

To apply, please visit Loyola University Human Resources at:

http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities

Retro-computing on Campus

Over the years Loyola has has a variety of computer systems, including this IBM 1620 Data Processing System. The 1620, considered to be a small, affordable model, was manufactured by IBM between 1959-1970, during which time 2,000 were produced.

Check out the IBM 1620 in action in the 1966 film The Story of Technology:

I.T.U. – Story of Technology – 1966 from Linotype: The Film on Vimeo.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.