Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The Loujon Press

Staples of the New Orleans arts scene, Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb and Jon Webb started the Loujon Press in 1960 and published their first literary magazine, The Outsider, the following year. The husband and wife team worked hard to establish their press. Gypsy Lou sold paintings on pirate’s alley during the day and set pages of type at night while Jon recruited literary talent and marketed subscriptions. The publication soon gained notoriety for the quality of the hand-printed editions and its larger runs of up to 3,100, which guaranteed a wider audience. Though sold at only one or two dollars a copy, the little magazine became an important part of the beat movement, publishing poetry by poetry by Charles Bukowski and Allen Ginsberg among many others.

The Outsider volume 1, number 1, fall 1961, cover with a photo of Gypsy Lou

The Outsider, volume 1, number 1, fall 1961, page 67, poem by LeRoi Jones (later known as Amiri Baraka)

The Outsider, volume 1, number 1, fall 1961, back cover with photos of featured poets

The Outsider, volume 1, number 2, summer 1962, cover with photos of Gypsy Lou, Willie Humphrey (top) and Dee Dee Pierce (left)

The Outsider, volume 1, number 2, summer 1962, title page with image of Loujon Press location on Royal Street

The Outsider, volume 1, number 2, summer 1962, page 24 and 25 with a poem by Ray Bremser and drawing by Ben Tibbs

The Outsider, Volume 1, Number 3, Spring 1963, cover with photo of Charles Bukowksi

The Outsider, Volume 1, Number 3, Spring 1963, back cover with photo of a second line; The second and third volume include “jazz documentary” chapters that detail the history of jazz in new orleans and the careers of many of the musicians of that era.

With the funding of a New Orleans patron, the Loujon Press also published two books of Bukowski’s poetry. Hand-printed in an edition of 777, the first book, It catches my heart in its hands, features 65 poems and several drawings by Bukowksi. A cult-hero and prolific author, Bukowksi became known for his direct language and focus on the downtrodden in American society.

Charles Bukowksi, It catches my heart in its hands, 1963, cover

Charles Bukowksi, It catches my heart in its hands, 1963, page 14 and 15

The publisher’s note paints a picture of the hardships Jon and Gypsy Lou endured to complete projects as well as their intense passion for their work.

Charles Bukowksi, It catches my heart in its hands, 1963, publisher’s note (photo of Bukowksi to the left on back cover)

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

How-to Tuesday: Chocolate!

Happy How-to Tuesday from the Special Collections & Archives! Today, we offer a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker’s  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones:

Loup Garou 1999

Tommorow,  Loyola hosts Wale for the traditional spring concert series, Loup Garou! Back in 1999, Loyola hosted its 2nd Loup Garou with a performance by RUN DMC. The 1999 Loup Garou was hosted on October 24th in the Palm Court  and student tickets were $7. Below is an essay written by a Loyola student, Becky Dickinson, who was on the committee for the concert. Dickinson describes how much fun planning the concert was. Additionally,  she describes the amazing opportunity she had to meet RUN DMC and interview them. Most importantly, she notes the emphasis RUN DMC placed on the importance of educating people on the art of rap in hopes that society will recognize it as a respectable music form. Moreover, RUN DMC argues that rap music can have a positive influence on society. Maybe some of you will be lucky enough to meet Wale at the concert tomorrow, at 8pm, and disscuss the importance of rap music! You never know!

RUN DMC

RUN DMC

Click image to open larger view

RUN DMC

Click image to open larger view

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

We’re Hiring! PT Learning Commons & Stacks Assistant

The Monroe Library seeks a Part-time Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant who will provide basic circulation, reference, and technology assistance in an active learner-centered environment. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is responsible for conducting collection inventory and stacks maintenance. The Learning Commons and Stacks Assistant is also responsible for opening the library Monday through Friday.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree or two years of college and two years of library experience; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with library users and colleagues; excellent customer services skills; skills and experience in the use of computer applications for word processing, scanning, printing, spreadsheets; comfort with the use of technology for data analysis; collaborative problem-solving skills and initiative with a high degree of accuracy in complex, detailed work.

Physical Requirements: Access upper library shelves with a step stool and bend to lower shelves; lift and carry equipment, supplies, or materials weighing up to 30 lbs; push a fully loaded, wheeled, book cart, up to 100 lbs.; sustain long periods of standing/walking back and forth; bend, stoop, and reach equipment and materials.

For info on how to apply, see: http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities

The New Orleans Water Cure

Sometimes when browsing the books in our Special Collections & Archives a title just beckons you to pluck it from the shelf.

Today it was a volume entitled New Orleans Water Cure, by Father François Rougé. Written around 1887, this book outlines and explains how to use Bavarian priest Sebastian Kneipp’s, “Water Cure” to treat illnesses.

Sebastian Kneipp

Kneipp’s Water Cure was by no means exclusive to New Orleans, nor was it created here. The “Kneipp Cure” was essentially Kneipp’s take on hydrotherapy combined with naturopathic medicine.

The volume pits Kneipp’s hydrotherapy against the use of medicines to treat illness and outlines the processes involved in seeking and administering the cure.

Here is an excerpt illustrating the anti-medicine stance of the Kneipp Water Cure:

One of the more whimsical seeming requirements (part of Kneipp’s “hardening process”) was walking in the dew barefoot.  This actually became a (somewhat ridiculed) fad in Central Park in New York City, where gentlemen and ladies were seen walking barefoot in the morning dew or winter snow.

Kneipp’s methods (called Kneippism) combine hydrotherapy with diet, exercise, and herbal medicine. He was the most famous nature doctor of his time whose clients included Archduke Franz Ferdinand and Pope Leo XIII.

Franz Ferdinand

Pope Leo XIII

The Kneipp Water Cure located in New Orleans opened to the public on July 11th, 1896  in the area of Flood St. and Levee St. (Peters St. and Flood St.), and was initially run by Father Rougé, the author of book.

Daily Picayune advertisement from July, 31, 1898

Above is an image of the New Orleans Kneipp Water Cure (Cure D’Eau) from around 1905-1910. (Note the large water tower.)

Kneippism still flourishes today with a popular line of Kneipp naturopathic products available as well as locations where you can undergo Kneipp derived therapies.

Please feel free to come to visit the Special Collections & Archives to check out this book in our reading room Monday through Thursday 9:00am to 4:30pm.

Now Hiring: Learning Technologies Developers

Learning Technologies Developer – University Library (2 openings)

The Learning Technologies Developer will plan, create, implement, and support media and web content to enhance student and faculty learning. This position is responsible for the successful implementation and enhancement of digital content affiliated with the library’s Blackboard, teaching, and learning initiatives, as well as backend maintenance and support for content delivery and management systems.

The Learning Technologies Developer works to enhance how faculty and students utilize technology and online learning tools to increase active learning, refine critical thinking and communications skills, and develop information and media fluencies. Oversee media and application production services that support teaching and learning at Loyola.

Qualifications: Completion of an undergraduate degree required; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with faculty, staff, students and others; ability to work productively in a team environment; excellent organizational and project management skills; must have in depth knowledge of computer operating systems, web browsers; demonstrated proficiency with MS Office, video and audio editing, webpage creation, and other applications such as Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Final Cut, etc.; experience with object-oriented programming and/or scripting languages; experience producing digital or web-based instructional materials and streaming media; experience working in an academic environment preferred; experience developing and conducting training sessions preferred; experience with Adobe Flash, web programming languages such as CSS & XML, and Blackboard or other LMS (Learning Management System(s).

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.

Now hiring: Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Part Time

Special Collections & Archives Projects Assistant, Part Time – University Library

The Special Collections & Archives Assistant collaborates with library faculty and staff in Special Collections & Archives duties, including reference assistance, processing of collections, digitization, exhibit preparation, and preservation activities on a part-time basis. The ideal candidate will demonstrate skills in project management, customer-focused service, team collaboration, and have an interest in archival description and digitization. The position is temporary, and expires in December 2015.

Qualifications: B.A. degree, or equivalent; excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with colleagues and patrons; ability to work productively in a team environment; computer skills in an online, multi-tasking environment; high degree of accuracy and focus concerning complex, detailed work; collaborative and creative problem-solving ability; ability to manage multiple projects in a time sensitive environment.

Highly desirable qualifications include at least two years of library or archival experience and/or MLS; experience working in an academic library; experience with digitization and/or exhibit preparation; experience with online collection management system, such as ARCHON.

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to: resumes@loyno.edu or print an application and mail signed application to:

Human Resources Department
Loyola University New Orleans – Box 16
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118

More information is available on the Human Resources website.

New Orleans Traffic: Then and Now

Our how-to today is inspired by A traffic survey of New Orleans metropolitan area, 1944-1945. This report located in the stacks of our Special Collections & Archives was produced in a time before I-10 existed and when the main airport for New Orleans was located on Lake Pontchartrain.

Be you on foot, driving a car, biking or taking a city bus… Traffic (and getting stuck in it), is (and was) inevitable. Whether it’s the junction of I-10 and 90 around the New Orleans landmark, the Superdome, trying to get ANYWHERE during Mardi Gras or navigating the overcrowding of cars and shoppers on Magazine Street…. Everybody gets stuck in traffic.

These days we have traffic information available on our smartphones that automatically re-route us based on real-time geolocation data. In 1944,  these were the results of the timely endeavor of gathering and mapping traffic patterns…

Versus the ease of getting the flow of traffic this morning…

So, how did traffic flow in 1944 New Orleans?

Here is what car traffic looked like…

And transit based traffic…

Currently, a section of I-10 called the Claiborne Expressway is on a list of Freeways Without Futures with active proposals seeking its removal.

This area was once a thriving commercial area and greenbelt that became decentralized through the bisecting of the neighborhood by the interstate.

“Claiborne Avenue: Past, Present, and Future” from Congress for the New Urbanism on Vimeo.

Good luck getting around and a here’s a lagniappe of Ringo Star making sure you take the time to stop and smell the roses!

A traffic survey of New Orleans metropolitan area, 1944-1945 is available for viewing at the Special Collections and Archives, Monday – Friday from 9:00 – 4:30.

21st Amendment Anniversary

This Saturday, December 6, marks the 81st anniversary of the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, which repealed the nationwide prohibition on alcohol.

Image from the National Archives

Beneath the headline “Return of Liquor Taken Quietly by City, Celebrants,” the Times Picayune reported:

Formal prohibition repeal became effective in New Orleans Tuesday night in a surprisingly unobtrusive manner.

A number of private or semi-private “repeal” celebrations were held in homes and clubs, but a glimpse into one of this city’s more popular saloons or larger restaurants Tuesday night would scarcely have indicated that the 13-year drought was just ended.

It was scarcely mentioned in barroom conversation that repeal, one of the most widely discussed questions in American during the past few years, had at last become a fact. An occasional, casual, “Well, Joe, It’s legal now,” was all that as usually heard.

The nonchalant tone of repeal extended to the Loyola Maroon as well. A review of the archived issues shows that the repeal was not mentioned in the student newspaper at all immediately after it’s passage.

In contrast to the calm repeal of prohibition, the passage of the Eighteenth amendment, banning the sale of alcohol in 1919, was a fraught one. Opposing Views: The Battle Among Louisiana’s Urban Newspapers During the Ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment, held in Special Collections and Archives, documents the public battle waged across the state on the issue. Can you guess which side the New Orleans press supported?

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Cookies!

Keep your eyes open for pop-up cookie parties in the library starting on December 8th!