Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence, June 1887

Today, in celebration of Lafcadio Hearn’s birthday on June 27th,  we are highlighting pages 5-7 of Letter 24 from our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection. This collection primarily consists of letters written between the years 1840-1896 from Hearn to Page Mercer Baker, a New Orleans newspaper founder, reporter, and editor.

The Lafcadio Hearn was a reporter, writer, wanderer, and world traveler. Born in Greece, he spent a difficult childhood in Dublin Ireland, and England. Hearn then emigrated to the United States, living in Cincinnati, New York, and New Orleans, to eventually be laid to rest in Japan. He is a truly fascinating literary figure known not only for his writing about the underbelly of life, African American culture, Japanese ghost stories, and the macabre but also for his life spent as an outsider and traveler.

The letter was written in the month of June in 1887 days before he traveled from New York City to Trinidad aboard the Barracouta on an assignment for Harper’s Magazine. The resulting article “Midsummer Trip to The West Indies” appeared in the July 1888 issue of the magazine.

Hearn’s excitement for traveling south towards the climate of New Orleans is obvious as found in the prose of his letter:

“I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O.”

As the letter progresses, Hearn continues writing Baker, conjuring lands beyond his beloved city New Orleans and towards a new landscape that he will encounter as he travels further and closer to the lungs of the world:

“I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world….”

(Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence Collection, Letter 24, pages 5-7)

Below you will find a full transcription of these last 3 pages of the letter wherein Hearn writes to Baker of life and the transcendent qualities of light:

I am writing as usual in a hurry. One day more, Then South. I will pass you by again, and not see you, – but I think I will feel when the steamer cuts the line of parallel with N. O. Then, a few days more and I shall be more than a thousand miles south of you. All the way the sky will deepen it’s blue. – I will see New Orleans colors for awhile: – then stranger and weirder colors, and new sky, – unknown lights of another world. And it will be very hot, – as if one were getting closer to the breath of the world…. After all, I cannot say I feel glad at going. The sensation of belonging to nowhere, – of instability; – nothing solid or certain in life or work or effort, – always comes on one prior to seeking a strange latitude. You understand, as by some sudden revelation, what a monstrous whirl of dust and light all life is, and that you are but one atom of the eddy, – may be laid here, there, anywhere, – to rest a little, to struggle a little, or to shine a moment in the light; but sooner or later all the motes float into the darkness and the silence forever. Before, it will be some consolation to have seen what makes life and thought, – Light, in the most splendid aspect it can offer to human eyes.

Please don’t show my letter to anyone, outside Toledano and Prytania corner, – so that I can write to you just as I want

Always with love to you,

Lafcadio Hearn

Goodbye!

You can find this letter in its entirety along with others in our Digital Library or come and view the complete Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence collection in person Monday through Friday 9:00 – 4:30 in the Special Collections & Archives located on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Bonus Info: Follow these links to enjoy a fascinating 2-part radio documentary produced by RTE Lyric FM in Dublin, Ireland and learn more about Hearn’s life and work.

Lorraine “Lorena” Dureau

Lorraine Dureau Newsham graduated from Loyola University New Orleans in 1955 with a Bachelor of Music. She had become somewhat of a local celebrity, praised for her ability to be both a wife and student, but more importantly for her voice.  She was an up and coming opera singer, having performed with Norman Treigle during the 1940s and an active member of NORD (New Orleans Recreation Department), and was accepted to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House after finishing her time at Loyola but was unable to attend after suffering from a broken rib that put her out of work for the opera season.
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Devastated by her missed opportunity she sought out other options and was encouraged by Miguel Bernal, the dean of the College of Music at the time, to try her hand in Mexico where the opera scene was growing in popularity and was performing year round.  It is not clear by our records the exact time she left, but by 1957 Lorraine was in Mexico, apparently leaving everything behind, including her husband at the time, John Newsham. Her collection is full of photos and articles from her time in Mexico, giving us a picture of what her life was like and all of the people she met and grew close to.
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In Mexico she became a star and her music career soared while earning herself a new name in the process, Lorena Dureau. She preferred performing repertoire of her favorite songs rather than complete operas but excelled in both, appearing on stage, radio, and television, all while also furthering her career as a writer.

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She wrote articles for many publications around the world both during her time in Mexico and after returning to New Orleans in 1978. She had been writing short stories and poems since she was a little girl and took up the skill again as she led her singing career away from performing and in the direction of teaching and turned to novels.  While her first unpublished manuscript was titled By the Sword (date unknown) and written under the pen name Lorry Newman, her first published work was a book titled The Last Casquette Girl (1981), starting her on the trend of romance novels that would follow which included Lynette (1983), Iron Lace (1983), and Beloved Outcast (1987).


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After returning to New Orleans she captured the attention of a local businessman by the name of George Lehleitner, famous for his work both in the New Orleans community and his actions in helping both Alaska and Hawaii achieve statehood. George had seen an article about Lorraine that was written by an old family friend and contacted the friend to say that he was interested in meeting this fascinating woman. Persistent in his desire to meet Lorraine she eventually accepted his offer for lunch, starting the beginning of a wonderful relationship as the two were soon married and lived our their lives with each other, traveling to many places together as Lorraine also re-visited Mexico many times.

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Interesting cannot even begin to describe this woman as her collection takes you on a wild tale of one woman’s journey through life. From her days at NORD and Loyola to Mexico and opera, writing of romance novels and articles on voodoo, dolls, Mexican culture, and more.

This information is from the Lorraine Dureau collection, which is currently being processed at Loyola University New Orleans in the Special Collections & Archives by students.

Blog Post by Caitlin Page, a Special Collections Student Worker.

Louisiana Out-Of-Doors: A Handbook and Guide

Louisiana Out-of-Doors is an illustrated handbook of Louisiana natural history and outdoor recreation published in 1933.

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Fully indexed, it outlines all sorts of information and statistics including the geology of the state, outdoor activities, and locations listed with addresses, photos are scattered throughout (it even has a guide to poisonous snakes and snakebite treatments).

Map of Louisiana

Physiographic Map Of Louisiana

This handbook comes with a separate foldout map that has points of interest numbered for easy reference.

Features of Interest Map

One activity that is highlighted is fishing or angling, one of Louisiana’s favorite pastimes. Of course, crawfish (Crayfish) are of special interests, but fishing, in general, is also explored.

The Creole Crayfish Net

Louisiana Swamp Crayfish

Four Jacks

This is a great book to utilize when searching for recreational activities today as well as a great resource for researching the history of recreation and outdoors adventure in mid-twentieth century Louisiana.

Come check out this and other Louisiana naturalist books Monday-Friday in the Special Collections & Archives on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library.

And here us a little something extra, Dough Kershaw doing Louisiana Man:

Faculty Search Announcement: Instruction and Research Coordinator

To apply: Email letter of application, resume, and 3-5 references with contact information to:
Deborah Poole, Dean of Libraries

Submissions must be submitted in pdf or MS Word format.
Application deadline is May 16, 2016.
Loyola University’s Monroe Library is located in beautiful uptown New Orleans, facing Audubon Park and the historic streetcar line. Loyola University is a Catholic institution that emphasizes the Jesuit tradition of educating the whole person.  The Monroe Library has been consistently ranked as one of the Best College Libraries by Princeton Review. Loyola University offers a generous vacation and competitive benefits package for full-time employees.
Loyola University is an AA/EOE employer.

Loyola University New Orleans
Job Description: Instruction and Research Coordinator
J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library

Title of Position: Instruction and Research Coordinator

College: University Library                               Date Written: 2011, revised 2016

I.       SUMMARY OF POSITION

This a full-time 12-month, tenure-track member faculty position. The Instruction and Research Coordinator leads the library’s instruction program and the strategic planning and assessment of information literacy learning outcomes; develops and offers research and technology instruction to the Loyola community; promotes the integration of information literacy throughout the curricula; coordinates the Teaching and Learning Team, including the library’s liaison program.

II.      ORGANIZATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Responsible to: Dean of Libraries

Assignments received from: Dean of Libraries and library teams

Interacts with: Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community; library teams and university committees; university departments and offices; colleagues and professionals in the field

Nature of Supervision: Meets regularly with the Dean of Libraries

Nature of supervision given and individual(s) or groups supervised: Supervises, mentors, and trains library faculty, staff, and student employees as needed

III.    DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

A.          Essential Functions

1.   Leads strategic planning and assessment of the library’s instruction program.

Provides vision and sets priorities for the Teaching and Learning Team to align with the Library’s and the University’s strategic goals. Works with Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum to develop information literacy learning goals and assess outcomes in the Loyola Core.

2.   Coordinates and provides information literacy and technology instruction.

Promotes efforts to integrate information literacy into assignments, courses, and throughout curricula. Collaborates with Media Services, Learning Commons, Special Collections & Archives, and Online Learning Team regarding instruction. Maintains the library instruction teaching schedule and classroom reservations.

3.   Leads the Library’s active liaison program to partner with teaching faculty on information literacy, research support, collection development, and the use of information resources. Facilitates collaboration between the Teaching and Learning Team and the Information Resources Team.

4.   Develops a community of practice among the library instructors. Creates internal and external opportunities for professional development regarding instruction.

5.   Provides, coordinates and assesses reference and research services, including the AJCU chat service.

6.   Participates in local, regional, and national library instruction communities.

Keeps current with trends and fosters awareness of new developments in research, instruction, scholarship and technology trends in order to integrate them into the library’s practice and planning.

7.   Serves as a liaison to designated academic departments and centers on campus. Serves as liaison to the Honors program. Engages in collection development that supports teaching and learning in liaison departments.

8.   Serves on library and university teams and committees. Serves as the library’s representative on the Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum.

9.   Engages with area high schools  and community partners to promote information literacy, lifelong learning, and academic libraries.

10. Fulfills expectations for promotion and tenure, including scholarship.

B. Additional Responsibilities

1.   Participates in professional development to enhance skills and knowledge; attends professional meetings and conferences.

2.   Identifies grant opportunities and works collaboratively to create proposals in support of library instruction.

IV.       QUALIFICATIONS

A.  Required Education, Experience, Skills and Abilities

1.   Master of Library Science or equivalent degree from an American Library Association accredited school.

2.   Minimum of two (2) years experience in an academic library related to instruction, reference, and liaison services.

3.   Teaching experience, including information literacy, technology instruction, or instructional design. Knowledge of the concepts articulated in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Demonstrated knowledge of student learning outcomes assessment.

4.   Demonstrated leadership skills and experience in planning, implementing and assessing library initiatives.

5.   Experience supervising and mentoring.

6.   Excellent interpersonal skills, including the ability to foster a diverse and collegial work environment that encourages innovation.

7.   Demonstrated skills and experience in collaborating within and outside the library to develop and deliver quality service.

8.   Ability to balance varied responsibilities; demonstrated ability to work in an active learning environment and juggle multiple tasks.

9.   Ability to develop and create online tutorials, guides, and other learning objects.

10. Potential to meet the requirements for promotion and tenure, including evidence of contributions to the scholarship of librarianship or teaching and learning.

B.        Additional Desirable Qualifications

1.   Familiarity with information literacy assessment tools.

2.   Experience developing tutorials, research guides, and other learning objects.

3.   Experience with teaching online.

4.   Experience with Blackboard or other course management software.

5.   Additional advanced degree.

Egypt: Descriptive, Historical, and Picturesque

Today we take a look at volume 2 of a 2 volume set Egypt: Descriptive, Historical, and Picturesque.

We are sharing with you the 2nd volume, since volume 1 is much more fragile. Luckily it has been digitized and is available via Rice University’s The Travelers in the Middle East Archive (TIMEA) and through the Internet Archive.

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This book was compiled and written by Professor George Mortiz Ebers and translated by Clara Bell. Ebers was a German Egyptologist and writer (1837 –1898). Clara Bell (1834–1927) was a translator best know for her translation of the 90-volume work  The Human Comedy by Honoré de Balzac. Heavily illustrated, with over 400 images, with gilt edges. It is a large book at 387 pages and measuring 12 1/4″ x 15″ making the digitization of it a joy not only of access but for its ease of use.

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Today we offer you a selection of images (all of the artists are credited at the front of each volume) from the book with corresponding links to modern images, additional information, and locations of the sites.

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Located here. Also, a modern day image of the temple. It is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Image of Sekhmet statues near the Temple of Mut in Karnak, located here.

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Come check out this or one of our other rare books housed in the Special Collections & Archives at Monroe Library Loyola University New Orleans, M-F 9-4:30.

The Anatomy Of Melancholy

First published in 1621, The Anatomy of Melancholy was subsequently repeatedly expanded by its author Robert Burton (an Oxford don who also worked in the Oxford Library) 6 more times during his lifetime. His work in the library is informative in that The Anatomy of Melancholy is a book of many books, filled with citations, quotations, and interpretations of various specialists.

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Robert Burton is pictured (above) holding a book.

Burton, as described in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature, was “subject to depression of spirits” and wrote the book as an “antidote” for his own melancholy. A su generis work that covers much more territory than to just anatomize melancholy (though it is a dissection of it), it is a book that seeks to explain human emotions, and is a compendia of printed knowledge and science of the time.

It is composed of three parts:

First Partition = Causes of Melancholy

Second Partition = The Cure of Melancholy

Third Partition = Love Melancholy and Religious Melancholy

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The book is rooted in the dominate Greek Medicine theory of Humoralism. Within this theory, melancholy (clinical depression) is attributed to black bile, one of the Four Humors.

The Four Humors and their corresponding qualities:

Blood = Sanguine = Spring = hot and moist

Yellow Bile = Choleric = Summer = hot and dry

Black Bile = Melancholic = Autumn = cold and dry

Phlegm = Phlegmatic = Winter = cold and moist

Galen of Pergamon theories on the Humoral System of medicine influenced Western medicine for over a century. His theory of the Four Humors consisted of a holistic system that drew upon the Platonic philosophy of the relationship between the mind and the body. These fluids ran all through the body and where all thought to be present in the blood. For instance, if you poured a person’s blood into a glass, it would (theoretically) separate into these four fluids. These fluids and their corresponding temperaments (mind-body connections) need to be in balance for health, while disease occurs when they are out of balance. Treatments like blood letting, purging, vomiting, and food sought to bring the humors back into equilibrium.

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Burton wrote, and rewrote, The Anatomy of Melancholy as a treatment for his own struggles with depression. The fact that he revised and expanded the work with six published editions is a testament to his obsessiveness regarding the process and the need to “write of melancholy by being busy to avoid melancholy”.

We have two different editions here in the Special Collections and Archives and you can also find it online in full-text. It is a fascinating book that is satirical and serious and of a time when scholars wrote and read across the disciplines of science, medicine, and philosophy.

And here’s a little something extra: A BBC Radio IN OUR TIME  broadcast on the book.

The New Orleans Mint, March 8th, 1838

Today in celebration of the 178th anniversary of the opening of the New Orleans Mint, we bring you some images and info from the book Illustrated History of the United States Mint.

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Published in 1892, the book gives a complete overview of the American coinage history and production at the time.

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Here are the pages specific to the the New Orleans Mint:

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If you would like to take a closer look at this volume or other books on the history of New Orleans, come visit the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM till 4:30 PM.

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Here’s a Library Lagniappe for you. A film from 1940 showing how coins are minted!

Open Education Week 2016

March 7 through 11, 2016 is Open Education Week around the world. It seeks to spread recognition and use of free and open educational materials and promote an understanding of how these materials can benefit students and teachers. Ask us or your teacher about using open textbooks at Loyola. As the Open Education Week website says: “The open education movement seeks to reduce barriers, increase access and drive improvements in education through open sharing and digital formats.
Open education includes free and open access to platforms, tools and resources in education, including learning materials, course materials, videos, assessment tools, research, study groups, and textbooks, all available for free use and modification under an open license.”

Visit the Monroe Library’s Open Access guide at http://researchguides.loyno.edu/openaccess and the Open Textbook guide at http://researchguides.loyno.edu/opentextbooks.

Now Online: Informed Sources

Since 1984, WYES, New Orleans’ public television station, has been broadcasting Informed Sources, a program devoted to in-depth discussion of the news by local journalists.

The WYES Informed Sources Archive is now now available for viewing online, and offers a look at thirty years of local history through conversations about crime, politics, education and life in New Orleans. Take a look!

LIBRARY CLOSING AT 1PM

In anticipation of today’s inclement weather in the New Orleans area, Loyola University New Orleans will be canceling all remaining classes and activities beginning at 12:30p.m. today (February 23, 2016). The Monroe Library will be closing at 1 pm. Normal campus activities and operations will resume tomorrow.