Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Opera Student Pass Winner!

Congratulations to Alobi, pictured here with Special Collections and Archives Coordinator Trish Nugent, for winning our New Orleans Opera Association Student Pass contest. The contest involved a seek and find questionnaire & giveaway to support the “Encore! Encore! Bravi! Exhibit Introducing the New Orleans Opera Association Archives” exhibit in Special Collections & Archives. Alobi now has a student pass to the New Orleans Opera Association’s 2016-2017 season.

Congratulations, and thanks to all who participated!

Halloween Movies from the Library

Celebrate Halloween with this list of movie recommendations! All of these can be found in the Monroe Library DVD section on the first floor. Check them out!


1931 Todd Browning


1931 James Whale

King Kong

1933 Merian C. Cooper

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

1956 Don Siegel

El Angel Exterminador

1962 Luis Bunuel

The Exorcist

1973 William Friedkin

Star Wars IV A New Hope

1977 George Lucas


1978 John Carpenter


1979 Scott Ridely

The Shining “Special edition”

1980 Stanley Kubrick

The Thing

1982 John Carpenter

Beetlejuice “20th anniversary”

1988 Tim Burton

Edward Scissorhands

1990 Tim Burton


1995 David Fincher

Fight Club

1999 David Fincher

The Matrix

1999 The Wachowski Brothers

Howl’s Moving Castle

2006 Hayao Miyazaki

Sweeney Todd

2007 Tim Burton


Today’s #pagefright — this spooky fraternity page from the 1924 Wolf yearbook.

Spooky fraternity page from the 1924 yearbook.

#PageFrights is a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

Open Access Week!

Open Access Week 2016

This year Open Access (OA) Week is October 24-30.  This is the ninth year libraries, authors and others around the world are observing OA Week.  The theme for 2016 is “Open in Action.” As the OA Week website says: “International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research”

Open Access is a new model of scholarly publication based on sharing.

Open Access means free, immediate access to scholarly material in full.

It’s a reversal of the old model, where university faculty and researchers write articles, publish them in commercial journals, and the library has to buy them back for other faculty and students to read.

That’s paying for it twice–-in the researcher’s salary and the library’s money!  And the publisher owns the article and can decide when and how it’s used and reused-–the writer has very little further control over its use.  The Internet provides a quick and simple way to distribute information to the world at a minimal cost, and is paid by organizations and individuals who want to see their research get the widest possible audience.  Universities and libraries worldwide are getting behind this new model of scholarly publication.

Open Access Week is a time to learn about this powerful new model. Find more information at

New Equipment!

Media Services is happy to announce some brand-new equipment, ready to be used!

We are very excited to add to our inventory two new DSLR cameras (CANON t5i EOS 700D) and external microphones (VideoMic), for any high-quality photography or video needs you may have. These cameras also include two lenses: an 18-55 mm lens and 55-250 mm telephoto lens. These new cameras have the capacity to shoot incredible video, and are equipped with an audio input that can be used with an external microphone–such as lavalier microphones–or our brand new VideoMic microphones. This high-powered equipment is sure to make your photography reach new heights and your film projects pop!

Media Services has also expanded into more adventurous territory, adding to our inventory a GoPro Hero. This GoPro can shoot in four modes: Video, Photo, Burst (which takes ten pictures over two seconds), and Time-Lapse (which takes a picture every half-second). It is waterproof and boasts super stats like 1080p high-definition video capture. Wherever life takes you, take our GoPro!

We are also pleased to announce a new portable wireless speaker. Battery-operated, this device can be used for presentations, and comes with one wireless handheld microphone and one lapel microphone. It can also be used for any musical needs, and can connect to any device with a mini-jack or over Bluetooth! It is lightweight and portable, but packs a serious auditory punch!

By visiting the Monroe Library website at and following the “Reserve A/V Equipment” link under the Frequently Used banner, students and faculty are welcome to come have a look and reserve these exciting new items and much more!  Remember, we need 2 working days lead time for all equipment reservations!


A dance with a skeleton or a skeleton dance?

This is the time of year to ponder such choices and this Bio Grad Student opted for the prior.


And… here is a classic cartoon Skeleton Dance as a lagniappe:

This is part of #PageFrights, a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

Faculty Spotlight: Jim Hobbs

Monroe Library’s Online Services Coordinator, Jim Hobbs, was selected to receive the LOUIS Discussion List Guru Award for 2016! Jim was nominated by his peers due to his efforts and leadership in the areas of collection development and e-resources. The Louisiana Library Network (LOUIS) will present the award at the LOUIS Users Conference in Baton Rouge on October 5th to recognize him for fostering and moderating discussions on the LER-L Discussion List for Louisiana university librarians.

October 5: #AskAnArchivist day!

October 5 is #AskAnArchivist Day! Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives staff are eager to respond to any and all questions you have about archives and archival work. Tag us on Twitter at @MonroeLibLoyno and use #AskAnArchivist.

What questions can be asked?
No question is too silly . . .

  • What’s the craziest thing you’ve come across in your collections?
  • If your archives had a soundtrack, what songs would be on it?
  • What do archivists talk about around the water cooler?

. . . and no question is too practical!

  • What should I do to be sure that my emails won’t get lost?
  • I’ve got scads of digital images on my phone. How should I store them so I can access them later on?
  • How do you decide which items to keep and which to weed out from a collection?
  • As a teacher, how can I get my students more interested in using archives for projects?

For more information, see the news release from the Society of American Archivists and look at our Storify from last year’s #AskAnArchivist.

SCA Celebrates #PageFrights In October

This month Special Collections & Archives will be participating in #PageFrights.

What is Page Frights?

All is revealed via the Page Frights website @


Welcome to Page Frights, a month-long social media celebration of Halloween, library & archives-style.

This October, libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions around the world are sharing spooky, creepy, and otherwise frightening and/or Halloween-related books and images from their collections on social media using the hashtag #PageFrights. Follow along and join the conversation on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr, and other social media sites.”

Our first installment is from the 1969 Wolf yearbook (digitized and available online through Internet Archive), picturing 2 undergraduates playing with an Ouija board.

Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 10.34.18 AM

Look for more #PageFrights all throughout October!

And please come visit the Special Collections & Archives M-F from 9-4:30, located on the 3rd floor of Monroe Library.

Letterpress in the Archives: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana” 1916


There is no reason to doubt that it was the Citizens’ Bank that gave the name “Dixie” to the South. The origin of that word has never been positively determined, but the tradition that gives the credit to the Citizens’ Bank is certainly stronger than any of the other claims advanced. When the country was flooded with wild-cat money and counterfeiting was so common as to cast suspicion on nearly every species of paper money, the notes of this bank commanded respect throughout the great valley, and, in fact, everywhere in the country, and its ten-dollar notes were the standard of value. These notes in ante-bellum days were printed in the French language, and instead of bearing the numeral in English, they bore the French word “dix.” It became common when one was passing down the great river to trade at the Southern metropolis for him to say that he was going South to acquire some dixes. Thus it happened that the lower stretches of the river became known as the land of the dixies, or “Dixie land.”

“Citizens’ Bank & Trust of Louisiana”, New Orleans, 1916, p. 11

As the new project assistant in Special Collections & Archives here at Loyola, I have thoroughly enjoyed perusing the stacks as I better acquaint myself with the collection. Since my academic background is in printmaking and book arts, I naturally gravitate towards the rare books on our shelves, and I am continuously fascinated by the bindings and material qualities of these old books. Today I would like to share with you this small letterpress-printed pamphlet: “Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana,” New Orleans, 1916.

A modest book at first glance, “Citizens’ Bank..” is a lovely example of early twentieth century letterpress-printing. Although there is no press information on the title page of this pamphlet, there are clues in the tactile quality of the book that reveal how it was printed and what materials were used. It is sewn with a silky cord, and a knot tied on the spine of the book allows the pamphlet to close flat.  It is composed of a high-quality mould-made paper, which is evident in the paper’s strong, visible fibers and deckled edge, as well as watermarks that are visible when certain pages are held up to bright light. If you were to lightly brush your finger along the text of this book, you’d notice a texture, an imprint, which occurs because of the amount of pressure applied in the printing process. At close inspection you’d see that some of the text is over-inked in places, which creates a small puddle around individual letters. I could go on and on about the letterpress process, but instead I’ll refer you to this resource if you’d like to learn more.

This book was letterpress printed on high quality paper because its materials were likely intended to reflect the history of a wealthy institution: the Citizens’ Bank & Trust Company of Louisiana. Its brief 31 pages outline the history of the bank, and the book serves as a well-crafted advertisement for the financial institution. You can view more images of this book (and many more) on our tumblr, or come in for a visit on the third floor of Monroe Library!