Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Constitution Day

Celebrate Constitution Day at the Monroe Library on September 17, 2014.

Need a Textbook? Try Our Reserves

What are reserves?
Physical reserves are materials that professors ask the library to set aside for use by students in their classes. They may do this to make sure that no one student checks out an important book or they may do it to make class materials more widely available.

Where are reserves and when can I use them?
Reserves are shelved behind the library’s Learning Commons desk. Just ask for a reserve book at the desk by the professor’s name and the title of the book, score, CD or DVD. You can use them any time the library is open, up until 15 minutes before closing.

What kinds of things are on reserve?
They may be the actual course textbook, or supplementary materials for the class. They can be books, scores, CDs or DVDs that are owned by the library or owned by the professor and temporarily loaned to the library.

What’s the difference between physical reserves and e-reserves?
If your class is using a whole book, it will be on physical reserve. Book chapters or articles will be scanned and posted under Library Resources in your Blackboard course.

Who decides what goes on reserve?
Your professors! If your professor has not placed a copy of the textbook for your class on reserve, you may ask him or her to do so, or you may request that we ask on your behalf. Sometimes a librarian will pull materials from the library’s collection that are on your syllabus and place them on reserve for your class so the library’s copy will not be stolen or lost.

How do I know if my professor has materials on reserve?
There is a big black binder at the Learning Commons desk that is organized by professor, showing what each professor has on reserve. There should also be a link to a course’s physical reserves under Library Resources in Blackboard.

How long can I check out materials on reserve?
The professor who places the item on reserve decides on the loan period, but it may be 2 hours, 4 hours, or overnight. The 2 hour loan period is the most popular for books, as it allows for more students to use the materials without having to wait. The 4 hour loan period is used for DVDs because most films are longer than 2 hours.

Can I take reserve materials out of the library?
The library holds a student’s Loyola i.d. at the Learning Commons desk while the materials are checked out to ensure that we know what is checked out and so that students are more likely to return the materials on time.

If you need help with Reserves, or if you have questions, please contact Laurie Phillips at 864-7833 or phillips@loyno.edu

Loyola on 9/11

On the thirteenth anniversary of the attacks of September 11, Found in the Archives looks back at how our campus reacted and responded to the tragedy.

The first Maroon printed after the events, on September 14th, describes the scene on campus  in the morning as the attacks unfolded:

“The Danna Center was crowded with people sitting on the floor and leaning against walls, eyes glued to the television, waiting to hear news of the latest updates on the worst attack on America since the bombing of Pearl Harbor….There were tears; there were hugs; there was anger; but most of all there was shock.”

As the day unfolded some professors cancelled classes, but not all, as the university wanted to have somewhere for students to go, and have their professors available to them if they needed to talk.

University Ministry, Student Affairs and the Student Government Association quickly met that morning and organized community meetings and prayer services for the afternoon. Students also began collecting money for the Red Cross an donating blood as a gesture of support.

The confusion and fear was compounded when an erroneous bomb threat was called in to campus, causing the evacuation of several buildings.

Later that day Loyola’s then President Rev. Bernard Noth, S.J. addressed students, faculty and staff on the Peace Quad.

As that awful day came to a close, Loyola’s campus, like the world, could only wonder what would come next. A Loyola student told the Maroon:

“Now all we can do is expect the worst, hope for the best, and pray for the victims and their families.”

You can read the entire September 14th issue of the Maroon here.

Now Hiring: Library Systems Developer

The J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library is seeking a user-focused Library Systems Developer. The Library Systems Developer collaborates with library faculty and staff on the maintenance, customization, and assessment of the library’s systems and website, contributes to the ongoing inventory of the library collection, and staffs the Learning Commons desk. The ideal candidate will demonstrate skills in project management, customer-focused service, team collaboration, and have an ability to develop skills in CSS, PHP, JavaScript, and Perl.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree preferred, excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with colleagues and patrons; ability to work productively in a team environment; computer skills in an online, multi-tasking environment; high degree of accuracy and focus concerning complex, detailed work; high level of technical skill; collaborative and creative problem-solving ability; ability to work independently to manage multiple projects in a time sensitive environment.

Application instructions at http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities

#howtotuesday: Speak New Orleanian

New to town? You will find that New Orleanians have a unique way of speaking, and it can sometimes take some getting used to. Today’s Found in the Archives is here to help.

First things first: How to pronounce New Orleans. For the “correct” way, let us turn to the The Yat Dictionary by Christian Champagne.

It may be useful to review “Actual Dialogue Heard of the Streets of New Orleans” by consulting F’Sure! published in 1978 by New Orleans cartoonist Bunny Matthews.

And last, but certainly not least, every New Orleanian should watch “Yeah You Rite!” , a gloriously 1980s documentary on the variety of New Orleans accents and dialects. The Monroe Library has a DVD copy you can check out. But in the meantime, enjoy dis lagniappe, dahlin’! 


Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Blackboard Workshops for Faculty

If you are interested in learning more about the new version of Blackboard, or need some help with the everyday use of the system, please feel free to attend one of our Blackboard workshops the week of Aug 18th. The full schedule is as follows:

Monday, Aug 18th

12pm – 1pm Blackboard Basics

2pm – 3pm Assessment and Grading in Blackboard

Tuesday, Aug 19th

2pm – 3pm Blackboard Basics

Wednesday, Aug 20th

10am – 11am What’s New in Blackboard

12pm – 1pm Safeassign Plagiarism Prevention Tool

Thursday, Aug 21st

10am – 11am Assessment and Grading in Blackboard

Friday, Aug 22nd

10am – 11am What’s New in Blackboard

2pm – 3pm Blackboard Basics

All workshops will be held in the LI classroom on the second floor of the Monroe Library, rm 229.

If you are interested in learning more about a specific topic or function we can arrange workshops for small groups or personal consultations upon request. If you would like to schedule something of this nature or have any questions about Blackboard in general, please feel free to contact the Blackboard Manager, Jonathan Gallaway, at 864-7168 or jgallawa@loyno.edu.

Faculty Search Announcement

INFORMATION RESOURCES LIBRARIAN, MONROE LIBRARY, LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS. The J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library is seeking an energetic, creative, analytical and user-focused Information Resources Librarian.

Functions as Information Resources Librarian:

  • coordinate development, management and assessment of the library’s print and electronic monograph collections as an active member of the Information Resources Team.
  • lead the Stacks Maintenance Team to create a successful user experience in the use of the library’s physical collections and for optimum use of library spaces; lead projects associated with physical collections.
  • monitor and analyze information resources budgets and endowments associated with print and e-book collections.

Functions as a Library Faculty Member:

  • Serve as a liaison to one or more academic departments
    • Promote and participate in the library instruction program. Work with faculty members to incorporate information literacy into assignments, courses, and programs. Contribute to curriculum revisions, including the scaffolding of information literacy goals. Develop opportunities to participate in intensive instruction.
    • Collect materials that support the curriculum.
    • Build relationships with the faculty members through outreach and collaborations.
    • Provide research and technology assistance and instruction in the Learning Commons, through appointments and consultations, and in courses
    • Serve on library teams and university committees.
    • Fulfill expectations for promotion and tenure. Show a pattern of growth and development in librarianship, teaching, scholarship and service.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

  • ALA-accredited MLS;
  • demonstrated interest in working with scholarly collections;
  • minimum of one year of experience with acquisitions, collection development, or publishing; demonstrated knowledge of major trends in scholarly publishing;
  • strong commitment to responsive and innovative service;
  • ability to balance varied responsibilities;
  • highly motivated and organized, with excellent interpersonal, communication, presentation, and writing skills;
  • clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with faculty, staff, and students;
  • demonstrated problem-solving skills;
  • comfort with the use of technology for selection and purchase of materials, and for data analysis;
  • skills and experience in project planning and implementation in a service environment; dedication to teaching, learning, and student achievement and success.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Experience with work in an academic setting.
  • Background in cataloging or a working knowledge of MARC and RDA
  • Knowledge of copyright issues, fair use, open acccess, and other copyright issues that pertain to an academic library

Loyola University’s Monroe Library is located on a beautiful campus in uptown New Orleans, facing Audubon Park and the historic streetcar line. Loyola University is a Catholic institution that emphasizes the Jesuit tradition of educating the whole person.

This is a full-time, 12-month, tenure-track faculty position with 20 days of vacation and competitive benefits package including TIAA-CREF.  Appointment will be at the Assistant Professor level ($46,500 minimum, salary commensurate with qualifications). For full job description, go to http://library.loyno.edu/jobs/irlib.pdf Email letter of application, resume and 3 references with contact information by September 22, 2014 to:  Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, phillips@loyno.edu.  Submissions must be submitted in .pdf or MS Word format.  Loyola University is an AA, EOE.

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Alumni Weekend: Library Tour

Alumni Weekend: June 20-22, 2014

Welcome Back Wolfpack!

Join us in the library for a guided tour as part of Alumni Weekend. The tour will take place at  5:00 p.m on Saturday, June 25th and will be led by Michael P. Olson, Ph.D., Dean of Libraries.

While you are here, have a look at your old yearbook or issues of  the student newspaper. They have been digitized and placed online as part of our digital archives collections.

A full calendar of Alumni Weekend events is available at http://alumni.loyno.edu/reunion-weekend.

Sports from the past

Today Found in the Archives highlights some of the lesser known athletic adventures of Loyola’s past. All of the photographs seen below were recently digitized from Special Collections & Archives collection of university photographs. Our ever-expanding online collection can be seen here.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesdays: 19th C. Engineer

Ever wondered how to be a nineteenth century engineer? We have the book for you!

The operative mechanic and British machinist; being a practical display of the manufactories and mechanical arts of the United Kingdom was published in America in 1826 by Cary and Lea of Philadelphia.

Title

Two volumes bound as one book, the Operative Mechanic instructs one on all manner of engineering.

contents

Including wind mill construction:
windmills

As well as the basics of harnessing “Animal Strength”:

animal

Feel free to come and see The Operative Mechanic for yourself in Special Collections and Archives!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.