Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Whitfield and the Lomaxes

John and Alan Lomax’s musical recordings of their trip to Southern Louisiana in 1934 gathering songs for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress have recently been made available online. This is a fascinating website that is entertaining as well as a user-friendly research tool. The attractive database is searchable by song indexes, interactive maps, as well as by performers’ names and parishes.

While looking around in our collections for related material, I came across a volume written by Irènè Thérèse Whitfield who collaborated with the Lomaxes during their research in Southern Louisiana.

Louisiana French Folk Songs published in 1939 was Irènè Thérèse Whitfield master’s thesis while studying at LSU. In 1934 during Irene’s research, her dean informed her of the Lomaxes (Alan was only 18 at the time) project and in turn helped establish a reciprocal relationship that benefited everyone involved. This association significantly privileged Whitfield in the successful completion of her groundbreaking book through the use of the sound recordings Lomax had made on a 300-pound portable recorder during their expeditions. While Irene’s local knowledge aided the Lomaxes in their work.

Picture of the recording equipment in the trunk of John Lomax’s car.

Here are a few selections found on the www.lomax1923.com website as well as in Whitfield’s book (click on the link or the index card to have a listen).

Jolie Blonde, from page 81.

Madame Fardueil, from page 86

Je veux me marier, from page 87

J’ai passé devant ta porte, from page 88

There is also a film by Alan Lomax about the culture of the bayous of Louisiana that is available for viewing in its entirety on Folkstreams: A National Preserve of Documentary Films about American Roots Cultures called Cajun Country (1991).

Here is the trailer for Cajun Country via YouTube

A new study of the 1934 trip Traditional music in coastal Louisiana: the 1934 Lomax recordings by Joshua Clegg Caffery (who is also the author of www.lomax1934.com/find the time to watch the lecture at the bottom of the page – it’s fascinating) was recently published and will soon be available for checkout from the Monroe Library.

In the meantime, these other materials related to Lousiana music and folk culture are currently available at Monroe Library for further research:

Alan Lomax: selected writings, 1934-1997

Cajun and Creole music 1934 [sound recording]: the Lomax recordings

Acadian folk songs by Whitfield, Irène Thérèse

Accordions, fiddles, two step & swing: a Cajun music reader

Buying the wind: regional folklore in the United States

Louisiana French folk songs is available for research Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30 at the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives

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Additional online resources used:

Cajun Folklife, by Ryan Brasseaux

Lomax in Louisiana: Trials and Triumph, by Barry Jean Ancelet

A History of Folklife Research in Louisiana, by  Frank de Caro

Loyola students’ values: 1984

Thirty years ago this week The Maroon reported on a survey conducted by renowned sociologist and Loyola faculty member Joseph Fichter, SJ, measuring Loyola students stance on moral and social issues.

The article begins:

According to a recent survey, 74 percent of the Loyola student body say cheating on an exam or term paper is always wrong, while only 15 percent condemn premarital sex. Sixty-two percent of the students surveyed approve a nuclear weapons freeze, while only 28 percent support abolishing capital punishment. These and other enlightening statistics come from a survey of Loyola undergraduates’ moral and social values distributed last spring.

Reportedly the first survey of it’s kind of Loyola, Fr. Fichter examined Loyola students’ attitudes on a variety of subjects, and how these attitudes may change over the course of their college careers. The results of the survey were published in 1984 as Loyola Students and Their Values.

The Maroon noted:

Fichter’s report on the survey offers an interesting analysis. He notes that freshmen are much more likely to reflect Loyola’s promoted moral and social values than seniors. This is to be expected as seniors become more independent and critical in their thinking, for traditionally a loss of idealism accompanies a loss of youth, according to Fichter.

Also noted is that Loyola’s statistics reinforce research which shows women to be more socially sensitive and willing to express religious beliefs than men are.

Fichter also points out that students in Catholic universities have been affected by changes in the Roman Catholic Church in the aftermath of the Second Vatican Council.

“In the area of religion and spirituality among Catholics we have seen a decline in idealism, a loss of self-confidence, an erosion of authority, and a growth in permissiveness that seems unrelated to traditional ethical principles,” Fichter said.

If you would like to learn more about Fr. Fichter’s work, his many published works are available in he library,  including Loyola Students and Their Values, The rehabilitation of clergy alcoholics : ardent spirits subdued and Who gets arrested in New Orleans? A research study of police arrests in 1962. In addition, Fr. Fichter’s papers are held in Special Collections and Archives and are publicly available for research.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Costuming Inspiration!

Halloween (like you didn’t know) is tomorrow and if you haven’t come up with a costume we have found some serious inspiration in the Special Collections & Archives for you!

Auguste Wahlen’s Mœurs, usages et costumes de tous les peuples du monde, d’après des documents and authentiques et les voyages des plus récents, is a 4 volume set (published 1843-1844) covering traditional dress from all over the world. Not only are these volumes eye-candy for fueling your Halloween costume dreams, but they are also a useful resource for those involved in theater costuming and performance studies.

Take a look!

These volumes are available for research Monday – Friday, 9:00-4:30 at the Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives.

3 of the 4 volumes can also be found through Google Books: here, here, and here.

Happy Halloween!!!

Let’s Get Physical!

Now that Fall is here and the nice weather is upon us (well, sort of), it’s time to get out there and join your Wolfpack ancestors in getting physical!

See more images of Loyola’s past at Special Collections & Archives University Photographs online.

And, for additional inspiration, some lagniappe:


Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives: Dueling

Today Found in the Archives looks at one of New Orleans’ most peculiar historical practices: Dueling.

Several volumes found in Special Collections and Archives tell the tale, including  Dueling in Old New Orleans by Stuart Landry.

Landry notes that duels were different than simple fights between men, but were social events fought by men of equal standing according to strict rules, known as the Code Duello. Dueling was popular in England, Ireland, and other parts of the American South (indeed, the Code Duello was codified by the Irish in the 1777) but truly thrived in New Orleans society, especially in the early nineteenth century. Landry writes:

In old New Orleans you had to be careful what you said or how you acted. If you criticized the leading soprano at the French Opera or inadvertently spilled a little of your mint julep on the cuff of the gentleman standing next to you at the bar, you might be called upon to expiate these delinquencies on the field of honor. During the 1830s more duals were fought here than in any other city on the world.

Dueling could take several forms. Fencing was a popular early method of battle, and fencing schools sprung up in New Orleans to instruct the city’s gentlemen in the art of rapier fighting. Most fencing schools were located in Exchange Alley, in the French Quarter.

Hartnett T. Kane’s Gentlemen, Swords and Pistols features a chapter on one of New Orleans’ most famous fencing masters, Don José “Pepe” Llulla. A native of the Spanish Balearic Islands, Pepe Llulla had a famous fencing school located in Exchange Alley, as the 1846 New Orleans City Directory shows:

Don Pepe Llulla was legendary in New Orleans, even in his own time. Lafcadio Hearn’s writings about Pepe Llulla and dueling are included in the collection of his writings  Inventing New Orleans. Hearn wrote that “while comparatively few are intimate with him, for he is a reserved man, there is scarcely a citizen who does not know him by name, and hardly a New Orleans urchin who could not tell you  ‘Pepe Llulla is a great duelist.’”

But fencing was not to remain New Orleanians preferred means of settling questions of honor. As Landry notes:

The early duels of New Orleans were fought with rapiers and swords…[b]ut when the Americans poured in to the city they took up dueling enthusiastically, and made it more deadly with the use of knives, pistols rifles and shotguns. With the rapier a slight wound was sufficient enough to satisfy honor, but where shotguns were used one of the duelists was nearly always seriously wounded or killed.

Dueling was not without it’s critics. In 1834 the Association Against Dueling was formed in New Orleans, and laws were passed against it, but the practice continued on through the century. Duels were famously precipitated by the slightest insults, and Landry tells of combat undertaken to preserve the honor of opera singers, “fat” ladies and, strangely, the Mississippi River. Many duels were fought in what is now New Orleans City Park, at a spot still referred to as the “Dueling Oaks”.

When Pepe Llulla died in New Orleans in 1888, the practice of dueling in New Orleans was also at it’s end. Landry states that the last duel under the City Park Oaks met on June 22, 1889.  The pistol duel was quickly broken up by police and the participants arrested, thus marking the end of the Code Duello in New Orleans.

To access any of the sources discussed here, please visit Special Collections & Archives anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 – 4:30.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Memorial Monday, September 26, 1881: New Orleans mourns a president

On Monday September 26, 1881 our 20th President James A. Garfield was laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio after complications from a gunshot wound took his life.  Though the disillusioned Federal office seeker Charles J. Guiteau had attempted to assassinate Garfield on July 2, 1881, it is widely believed that the gunshot wound would not have been fatal and had the medical care of the 1880’s truly understood the correlation between germs and infection.

Though one of the most lavish funerals to date was held in Cleveland, other cities around the country also held funeral rites. New Orleans was one of these cities.

In A history of the proceedings in the city of New Orleans, on the occasion of the funeral ceremonies in honor of James Abram Garfield, late president of the United States, which took place on Monday, September 26th, 1881 these funeral rites are presented in detail.

This volume contains a comprehensive account of the day’s proceedings as it recounts the many ceremonies presented throughout the city. Including transcripts of speeches, sermons, and detailed descriptions of the funerary decorations and the various processions.

One religious service was held at Seaman’s Bethel. A congregation that was located at 2218 Saint Thomas Street, a location that is still in religious service to this day.

In his memorial sermon, Rev. Dr Andrew Jackson (A.J.) Witherspoon, a former Confederate chaplain and founder of church, offered to his congregation of seamen the potential for Garfield’s death at “reuniting North and South, East and West”. His address surmised that Garfield’s goal as president could now be realized in his death  -–to bring peace to a post-civil war United States.

One impromptu river procession, The River’s Homage to The Dead President, recounts the gathering of tugboats adorned by black and white drapery, with whistles eerily echoing as they traveled from Morgan’s Ferry to Canal Street.

This volume is housed in the Special Collections and Archives of the Morgan Library.

There are full text scans available through Internet Archive and Google Books.

Constitution Day

Celebrate Constitution Day at the Monroe Library on September 17, 2014.

Need a Textbook? Try Our Reserves

What are reserves?
Physical reserves are materials that professors ask the library to set aside for use by students in their classes. They may do this to make sure that no one student checks out an important book or they may do it to make class materials more widely available.

Where are reserves and when can I use them?
Reserves are shelved behind the library’s Learning Commons desk. Just ask for a reserve book at the desk by the professor’s name and the title of the book, score, CD or DVD. You can use them any time the library is open, up until 15 minutes before closing.

What kinds of things are on reserve?
They may be the actual course textbook, or supplementary materials for the class. They can be books, scores, CDs or DVDs that are owned by the library or owned by the professor and temporarily loaned to the library.

What’s the difference between physical reserves and e-reserves?
If your class is using a whole book, it will be on physical reserve. Book chapters or articles will be scanned and posted under Library Resources in your Blackboard course.

Who decides what goes on reserve?
Your professors! If your professor has not placed a copy of the textbook for your class on reserve, you may ask him or her to do so, or you may request that we ask on your behalf. Sometimes a librarian will pull materials from the library’s collection that are on your syllabus and place them on reserve for your class so the library’s copy will not be stolen or lost.

How do I know if my professor has materials on reserve?
There is a big black binder at the Learning Commons desk that is organized by professor, showing what each professor has on reserve. There should also be a link to a course’s physical reserves under Library Resources in Blackboard.

How long can I check out materials on reserve?
The professor who places the item on reserve decides on the loan period, but it may be 2 hours, 4 hours, or overnight. The 2 hour loan period is the most popular for books, as it allows for more students to use the materials without having to wait. The 4 hour loan period is used for DVDs because most films are longer than 2 hours.

Can I take reserve materials out of the library?
The library holds a student’s Loyola i.d. at the Learning Commons desk while the materials are checked out to ensure that we know what is checked out and so that students are more likely to return the materials on time.

If you need help with Reserves, or if you have questions, please contact Laurie Phillips at 864-7833 or phillips@loyno.edu

Loyola on 9/11

On the thirteenth anniversary of the attacks of September 11, Found in the Archives looks back at how our campus reacted and responded to the tragedy.

The first Maroon printed after the events, on September 14th, describes the scene on campus  in the morning as the attacks unfolded:

“The Danna Center was crowded with people sitting on the floor and leaning against walls, eyes glued to the television, waiting to hear news of the latest updates on the worst attack on America since the bombing of Pearl Harbor….There were tears; there were hugs; there was anger; but most of all there was shock.”

As the day unfolded some professors cancelled classes, but not all, as the university wanted to have somewhere for students to go, and have their professors available to them if they needed to talk.

University Ministry, Student Affairs and the Student Government Association quickly met that morning and organized community meetings and prayer services for the afternoon. Students also began collecting money for the Red Cross an donating blood as a gesture of support.

The confusion and fear was compounded when an erroneous bomb threat was called in to campus, causing the evacuation of several buildings.

Later that day Loyola’s then President Rev. Bernard Noth, S.J. addressed students, faculty and staff on the Peace Quad.

As that awful day came to a close, Loyola’s campus, like the world, could only wonder what would come next. A Loyola student told the Maroon:

“Now all we can do is expect the worst, hope for the best, and pray for the victims and their families.”

You can read the entire September 14th issue of the Maroon here.

Now Hiring: Library Systems Developer

The J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library is seeking a user-focused Library Systems Developer. The Library Systems Developer collaborates with library faculty and staff on the maintenance, customization, and assessment of the library’s systems and website, contributes to the ongoing inventory of the library collection, and staffs the Learning Commons desk. The ideal candidate will demonstrate skills in project management, customer-focused service, team collaboration, and have an ability to develop skills in CSS, PHP, JavaScript, and Perl.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree preferred, excellent interpersonal, communication, and writing skills, with clear evidence of ability to interact effectively and cooperatively with colleagues and patrons; ability to work productively in a team environment; computer skills in an online, multi-tasking environment; high degree of accuracy and focus concerning complex, detailed work; high level of technical skill; collaborative and creative problem-solving ability; ability to work independently to manage multiple projects in a time sensitive environment.

Application instructions at http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/staff-employment-opportunities