Open Access Week 2018

Open Access (OA) Week 2018 is October 22-28.

Libraries, authors and others around the world are observing OA Week. The theme for 2018 is “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge.” As the OA Week website says: “This year’s theme reflects a scholarly system in transition. While governments, funders, universities, publishers, and scholars are increasingly adopting open policies and practices, how these are actually implemented is still in flux.”

Open Access is the growing model of scholarly publication based on sharing. Open Access means free, immediate access to scholarly material in full. Writing can be published on an institutional repository (“green open”) or published in a completely open journal (“gold open”).

It’s a reversal of the old model, where university faculty and researchers write articles, publish them in commercial journals, and the library has to buy them back for other faculty and students to read. That’s paying for it twice–-in the researcher’s salary and the library’s money! And the publisher owns the article copyright and can decide when and how it’s used and reused-–the writer has very little further control over its use. The Internet provides a quick and simple way to distribute information to the world at a minimal cost, where organizations and individuals see their research get the widest possible audience. Universities, libraries, and researchers worldwide are getting behind this new model of scholarly publication.

Open Access Week is a great time to learn about this powerful new model for publishing and distribution.

Code With Us in 2018!

Join the Monroe Library for a hands-on introduction to computer programming at our Hour of Code event!

  • When: Tuesday, November 6, 12:30-2pm
  • Where: Monroe Library Instruction Classroom (1st floor, Room 146 in the computer lab wing)

We’ll have fun introductory computer programming activities to choose from.

Anyone is welcome to attend. Please help spread the word to anyone on campus who you think may be interested! We’ll be following up in the coming weeks with a Research Guide; have a look at last year’s guide for more information. We’re also looking for participants to help lead coding activities; let us know if you’re interested!

The hour you spend working through the tutorial is just the beginning – you’ll also be directed to free online resources to continue learning independently.
No experience is necessary, and all are welcome! Feel free to bring your own laptop and headphones if you prefer to work on your own machine.

#loynocodes

About Hour of Code:
The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching millions of students in 180+ countries. The goal of the Hour of Code is not to teach anybody to become an expert programmer in one hour. One hour is only enough to learn that coding is fun and creative, that it is accessible at all ages, for all students, regardless of background. Above all, what all participants can learn in an hour is that we can do this.

Artistic Printing in the 19th Century Exhibit

Stop by and see Special Collections & Archives’ newest exhibit in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room: Artistic Printing in the Nineteenth Century curated by Loyola printmaking professor Bill Kitchens. This gorgeous exhibit displays Kitchens’ vast collection 19th century trade show cards and discusses the history of letterpress and lithographic printmaking in early American graphic design. We are thrilled to host this collection of colorful cards, books, and printmaking apparatuses in our Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library through the Fall 2018 semester. Come see it for yourself during our open hours: T-Th, 9-12 and 1-4pm.

#AskAnArchivist: That’s a wrap!

Thanks to everyone who participated in #AskAnArchivist day! You can see an archive of our participation here or browse it below.

If you missed #AskAnArchivist Day, never fear! At Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives, every day is #AskAnArchivist Day. If you have questions or concerns, we welcome you to contact our staff or visit out webpages for more information.

October 3: #AskAnArchivist day!

Students on computers in Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Lab

October 3 is #AskAnArchivist Day! Monroe Library Special Collections & Archives staff are eager to respond to any and all questions you have about archives and archival work. Tag us on Twitter at @MonroeLibLoyno and use #AskAnArchivist.

What questions can be asked?
No question is too silly . . .

  • What’s the craziest thing you’ve come across in your collections?
  • If your archives had a soundtrack, what songs would be on it?
  • What do archivists talk about around the water cooler?
  • Or, what the heck is going on in this photo?

. . . and no question is too practical!

  • What should I do to be sure that my emails won’t get lost?
  • I’ve got loads of digital images on my phone. How should I store them so I can access them later on?
  • How do you decide which items to keep and which to weed out from a collection?
  • As a teacher, how can I get my students more interested in using archives for projects?

For more information, see the news release from the Society of American Archivists.

Enterprise Introduction and Tutorial

Notice Anything Different?

We’ve made a few changes to the library’s space this summer, but you might also notice some touch ups we’ve made to the online search tools available on our home page. You’re probably already familiar with QuickSearch, the default search box on our landing page. It lets you build a search that looks through ALL of our print and digital holdings, both full-text and citation-only. But you might want to take some time to get to know Enterprise, accessible from our landing page by clicking on the “Catalog” tab.

Like the old Classic Catalog, Enterprise still lets users search ONLY for ebooks and for resources that we have in the library itself (scores, LPs, DVDs, etc.). Because we anticipate that people will have questions about this new search interface, we’ve put together a Q&A to explain what it can do for you. Scroll to the end of this post for a link to our video tutorial.

Why not just keep the old Classic Catalog?
It’s not that we’re shallow, but Enterprise is much easier on the eyes. Print is bigger, search boxes are roomier, and strategic use of boldface makes item descriptions easier to skim. Enterprise retains the functionality of the old catalog interface, its useful features are easier to find and set so everyone’s more likely to take advantage of them.

Can I still search by a specific format, like scores only or etextbooks only?
Absolutely! Just use the leftmost dropdown menu on Enterprise’s search bar. For example, you can search for DVDs only or just for physical reserves. There’s also still the same surgical precision that we were used to with the Classic Catalog – you can still search by keyword, author, title, subject, ISBN, and other options.

So what’s new?
With more recent print and electronic books, you’ll notice that users can click on a Google Preview button on the right hand side of the item’s record. This means that you can automatically look through some of a book’s actual content to see if it’ll be useful. Since not all books are contained in Google Books, this won’t be an option in every case, but it’ll still save you valuable research time.

Are journal articles and databases included in an Enterprise search?
They aren’t, but if you’re looking to do a broader search that also includes these kinds of resources, you’ll be better off using QuickSearch. If you want to see whether the library owns access to a specific journal title, our trusty Journal Finder tool will come in handy. It’s located just below the search box on our home page.

My Enterprise search just turned up 72 pages of results! Can I filter some out?
Totally. This is one of the more exciting and useful of Enterprise’s new features. Just look for the sidebar to the left of your results list. You can quickly and easily filter to include or exclude by name, material type, location in library, subject, and date.

To see Enterprise in action, click here for a brief tutorial.

Information services changes at Loyola

Over the summer, our membership in the statewide LOUIS library group brought us six upgraded and one new addition.  You’ll find them all in the Research Guide A-Z list and all appropriate subject guides.  If you have any questions about access to this or any other library materials, contact your liaison.
As part of our annual review of usage and cost, we have discontinued the following services:
  • America’s News
  • Arts Premium Collection (consists of AFI (American Film Institute) Catalog, ARTbibliographies Modern, Arts & Humanities Database‎, Design & Applied Arts Index, FIAF International Index to Film Periodicals Database, Film Index International (FII), International Bibliography of Art (IBA)‎, and the Screen Studies Collection)
  • BioOne.1
  • Music Collection
  • Performing Arts Database
  • Readers Guide Retrospective
  • U.S. Major Dailies (newspapers)
Also the Catholic Periodical and Literature Index is merging with ATLAS and will no longer be a separate database.

Check Out the Library Catalog’s Makeover!

Anyone who’s used our Classic Catalog interface to look for library materials might have noticed that its appearance is a little retro.  This is about to change, as we’ve given our old catalog a makeover that updates its look and makes it a lot more user friendly. Classic Catalog has served us well, but we think everyone will be excited by the improved experience they’ll get with our new catalog interface, Enterprise. It lets you do almost everything that Classic Catalog could do while also adding some great new features.

Browsing

One of the first things you’ll notice about Enterprise’s landing page is its rotating gallery of new materials in our catalog. Click on the button next to any new title in the gallery to see where it’s located in our collection. Alternately, you can change over to see galleries of faculty publications. This new front page lets you browse and keep up with the materials we’re adding every day. Plus, it keeps the same navigational capability but with more intuitively laid-out buttons and links that enhance usability.

Searching

Enterprise’s search functions are as robust as our old catalog’s, but fields are bigger, and buttons and drop down menus have larger print, which makes it much easier to click your way through to the results list. It’s also easier to find links to log in to your library account and to find relevant library information. Put simply, there’s just more room to breathe! One change you’ll see is that, while the old catalog required an AND between words to fully search all of the catalog fields, in Enterprise, you just enter the words without anything in between.

Filtering

Probably the most exciting thing about Enterprise is its added filtering options. If you’ve ever dreaded wading through several hundred results with the Classic Catalog interface, you’ll be relieved to hear that the new catalog has amped up filtering features that let you sift through and categorize your results in seconds. For each search you run, results will be sortable by author, material type, subject, and date. That means if you’re looking for a DVD and not a book, or if you know you want the high voice edition, you can cut through the clutter of too many results and find your item faster!

Because old habits die hard, we’ll be leaving Classic Catalog up through the end of June. But we hope you’ll take this chance to check out the new kid on the block — Enterprise. We’ll be working all summer to fine-tune and optimize it for a prime-time debut in the fall, so please give us your feedback!

Presenting Monroe Library’s Research Competition 2018 Winners!

Monroe Library is happy to announce the winners of its 2017-2018 Student Research Awards! Here are this year’s awardees:

Junior/Senior Category: Kaylie Saidin (English Literature) for her project on language and miscommunication in Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility
Freshman/Sophomore Category: Baylee Robertson (Theatre Arts) for her project on the gender politics of Shakespearean costume in Much Ado About Nothing

Each winner received a $200 award for the superlative and innovative research projects submitted. Monroe Library holds the contest each spring and is happy to honor the outstanding research conducted at Loyola. Congratulations to both student scholars!

Extended Study Hours Are Here!

Beginning at 9:00 am on Sunday, April 29, the library will be changing over to its extended study hours for the last week of classes through the end of exams. During both weeks, we won’t close on Sunday through Thursday nights, and we’ll have extended hours of operation Friday night through Sunday morning.

On days when we don’t close overnight, we’ll be offering free coffee, tea, and snacks to everyone studying into the wee hours. Be sure to get the academic year sticker on your i.d. updated so that LUPD can confirm that only Loyola community members are in the building during the late hours. (Parking Services can help you with this!)

Extended Study Hours

Sunday, April 29: 9 am – No Close
Monday, April 30: Open 24 Hours
Tuesday, May 1: Open 24 Hours
Wednesday, May 2: Open 24 Hours
Thursday, May 3: Open 24 Hours
Friday, May 4: Closes at midnight
Saturday, May 5: 11 am – midnight
Sunday, May 6: Open at 9 am – No Close
Monday, May 7: Open 24 Hours
Tuesday, May 8: Open 24 Hours
Wednesday, May 9: Open 24 Hours
Thursday, May 8: Closes at 9 pm
Friday, May 9: 8 am – 6 pm