French Quarter Findings

Old Absinthe House (1904)- From "Early Views of the Vieux Carre"

Many of us often find ourselves in some portion of the French Quarter, whether that be browsing the French Market, grabbing some beignets, or venturing down Bourbon. The French Quarter was the original heart of New Orleans, and the Special Collections archives have a few books that show the Vieux Carre in it’s early days.

Toulouse Street at Bourbon (1904)- From "Early Views of the Vieux Carre"

This image of Toulouse at Bourbon and the above image are from "Early Views of the Vieux Carre, New Orleans," featuring scenes by William Woodward. The publication is presented by the Issac Delgado Museum of Art, located in City Park.

It looks very different now from the good ol’ days of the early 1900′s!

"On Chartres Street- Horse and Wagon Days-In 1905" from "French Quarter Etchings" by William Woodward

View of St Louis Cathedral from Chartres on Bastille Day, 1905- from "French Quarter Etchings" by William Woodward

When you walk down one of the many historic streets of the Quarter today, you can still see that it has retained most of it’s historic charm, and even recognize some of the scenes from over one hundred years ago that are still here today. You can still take a horse and carriage ride down some sections of the Quarter, and the St. Louis Cathedral is still a highly visited and recognizably New Orleans location.

The Old Absinthe House (1904)- Seen from Bourbon- From "Early Views of the Vieux Carre"

Can you see the streetcar tracks in the foreground of the above image? In “Early Views of the Vieux Carre,” it states that these tracks carried the streetcar named “Desire.”

You can come view these books and more in Special Collections, Monroe Library 3rd floor, Monday-Friday 9:30am-4:30pm.

Blog post by Maureen Kelly, a Special Collections work-study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#howtotuesday: Gardening

George Washington Cable (1844-1925) is well known for his writing depicting Creole life in nineteenth century New Orleans (most notably Old Creole Days and The Grandissimes). Less well known, perhaps, is his penchant for gardening, and his 1914 book The Amateur Garden. Illustrated with many photographs of home gardens, Cable’s book asks such important questions as “Where to Plant What?”

Hence the initial questions – a question which every amateur gardener must answer for himself. How much subservency of nature to art and utility is really necessary to my own and my friends’ and       neighbors’ best delights? For – be not deceived – however enraptured of wild nature you may be, you do and must require of her some  subserviency close about your own dwelling.

Cable offers additional advice and encouragement to the amateur:

“Muffle your architectural angles in foliage and bloom”

And from Cable’s own garden:

“Some clear disclosure of charm still remote may beckon and lure”

The entire book The Amatuer Garden has been digitized and made available on the Internet Archive.

More recent gardening help can be found in “Gardening in New Orleans: A Publication of the New Orleans Gardening Society”.

Published in 1952, this volume walks the home gardener through all manner of foliage, including chapters on ferns, flowering vines, and azaleas, just to name a few.

Encourage your green thumb and come in to Special Collections and Archives to view these books for yourself!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Don’t leave your valuables unattended

Laptock Locks

It only takes a second for someone to walk away with your backpack, textbook or laptop.

Laptop cable locks and locker keys are available for checkout at the Learning Commons Desk.

Open Access Week

Oct. 20 through 26 is Open Access Week.  Open Access is the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research.  It has positive implications for publishing scholars and for students looking for free, high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship. Visit the Monroe Library’s Open Access guide and the Open Textbook guide for more information.

Halloween At Loyola

It is that time of year again! Ghouls, witches, and vampires return to our campus for another year of Halloween festivities. Halloween is the perfect time to go out in the city, watch scary movies, eat large sums of candy, and dress up in the wackiest or scariest costume. No plans for Halloween because you have an exam? Not this year! Halloween is on a Friday! Take full advantage of it.  Not sure how? In need of ideas? Maybe 1986 or 1998 Loyola students can inspire you. In 1986, Loyola students spent Halloween at parties, decorating the residences halls, trick or treating, or handing out candy to the underprivileged from the resident halls. In 1998, students trick or treated, ventured to the French Quarter to show off their costumes, went to haunted houses, participated in a pumpkin carving contest, drove around playing tricks on friends, attended scary movie screenings, or attended a seminar on paranormal research. Hope one of these ideas spark your interest and have spooktacular Halloween!
The Wolf 1986 page 90

The Wolf 1986 page 91

The Wolf 1998 page 58

The Wolf 1998 page 59

Blog post by Nydia Araya, a Special Collections work-study student.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Let’s Get Physical!

Now that Fall is here and the nice weather is upon us (well, sort of), it’s time to get out there and join your Wolfpack ancestors in getting physical!

See more images of Loyola’s past at Special Collections & Archives University Photographs online.

And, for additional inspiration, some lagniappe:


Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Identifying Microscopic Fungi

When I was looking through our stacks for a special volume to blog about, I came across Mordecai Cubitt Cooke’s Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi.

I was initially impressed by the illustrations…

Then, I found written imagery that showed signs of an eccentric at work, which peaked my interest…

Made curious, I did a little research… and found a man with a truly fascinating life!

M.C. Cooke did not have much in the way of a formal education but wrote hundreds of articles and books on botany and mycology. Collected roughly 46, 000 specimens, contributed over 20 years of service to museum collections, while editing journals and founding societies.

Mordecai, was a busy guy!

Rust, Smut, Mildew and Mold: an introduction to the study of microscopic fungi, is viewable in its entirety at the Internet Archive online, or by visiting the Special Collections and Archives anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 – 4:30.

1960s Midterms

It’s the middle of the semester, and for many of you that means midterm exams. Take solace in the fact that Loyola students have been working hard at their exams for over 50 years…

Uh-oh…

Wait, wake up!

Persevere! (And stay awake). Fall Break is just around the corner!

These photos and many more are available in the Loyola University Photographs Collection in the Louisiana Digital Library. Some of our favorites are currently on display in Special Collections & Archives in our Candid Campus exhibit. Stop by between 9 and 4:30pm, Monday – Friday to check it out.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Found in the Archives: Dueling

Today Found in the Archives looks at one of New Orleans’ most peculiar historical practices: Dueling.

Several volumes found in Special Collections and Archives tell the tale, including  Dueling in Old New Orleans by Stuart Landry.

Landry notes that duels were different than simple fights between men, but were social events fought by men of equal standing according to strict rules, known as the Code Duello. Dueling was popular in England, Ireland, and other parts of the American South (indeed, the Code Duello was codified by the Irish in the 1777) but truly thrived in New Orleans society, especially in the early nineteenth century. Landry writes:

In old New Orleans you had to be careful what you said or how you acted. If you criticized the leading soprano at the French Opera or inadvertently spilled a little of your mint julep on the cuff of the gentleman standing next to you at the bar, you might be called upon to expiate these delinquencies on the field of honor. During the 1830s more duals were fought here than in any other city on the world.

Dueling could take several forms. Fencing was a popular early method of battle, and fencing schools sprung up in New Orleans to instruct the city’s gentlemen in the art of rapier fighting. Most fencing schools were located in Exchange Alley, in the French Quarter.

Hartnett T. Kane’s Gentlemen, Swords and Pistols features a chapter on one of New Orleans’ most famous fencing masters, Don José “Pepe” Llulla. A native of the Spanish Balearic Islands, Pepe Llulla had a famous fencing school located in Exchange Alley, as the 1846 New Orleans City Directory shows:

Don Pepe Llulla was legendary in New Orleans, even in his own time. Lafcadio Hearn’s writings about Pepe Llulla and dueling are included in the collection of his writings  Inventing New Orleans. Hearn wrote that “while comparatively few are intimate with him, for he is a reserved man, there is scarcely a citizen who does not know him by name, and hardly a New Orleans urchin who could not tell you  ‘Pepe Llulla is a great duelist.’”

But fencing was not to remain New Orleanians preferred means of settling questions of honor. As Landry notes:

The early duels of New Orleans were fought with rapiers and swords…[b]ut when the Americans poured in to the city they took up dueling enthusiastically, and made it more deadly with the use of knives, pistols rifles and shotguns. With the rapier a slight wound was sufficient enough to satisfy honor, but where shotguns were used one of the duelists was nearly always seriously wounded or killed.

Dueling was not without it’s critics. In 1834 the Association Against Dueling was formed in New Orleans, and laws were passed against it, but the practice continued on through the century. Duels were famously precipitated by the slightest insults, and Landry tells of combat undertaken to preserve the honor of opera singers, “fat” ladies and, strangely, the Mississippi River. Many duels were fought in what is now New Orleans City Park, at a spot still referred to as the “Dueling Oaks”.

When Pepe Llulla died in New Orleans in 1888, the practice of dueling in New Orleans was also at it’s end. Landry states that the last duel under the City Park Oaks met on June 22, 1889.  The pistol duel was quickly broken up by police and the participants arrested, thus marking the end of the Code Duello in New Orleans.

To access any of the sources discussed here, please visit Special Collections & Archives anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 – 4:30.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Memorial Monday, September 26, 1881: New Orleans mourns a president

On Monday September 26, 1881 our 20th President James A. Garfield was laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio after complications from a gunshot wound took his life.  Though the disillusioned Federal office seeker Charles J. Guiteau had attempted to assassinate Garfield on July 2, 1881, it is widely believed that the gunshot wound would not have been fatal and had the medical care of the 1880’s truly understood the correlation between germs and infection.

Though one of the most lavish funerals to date was held in Cleveland, other cities around the country also held funeral rites. New Orleans was one of these cities.

In A history of the proceedings in the city of New Orleans, on the occasion of the funeral ceremonies in honor of James Abram Garfield, late president of the United States, which took place on Monday, September 26th, 1881 these funeral rites are presented in detail.

This volume contains a comprehensive account of the day’s proceedings as it recounts the many ceremonies presented throughout the city. Including transcripts of speeches, sermons, and detailed descriptions of the funerary decorations and the various processions.

One religious service was held at Seaman’s Bethel. A congregation that was located at 2218 Saint Thomas Street, a location that is still in religious service to this day.

In his memorial sermon, Rev. Dr Andrew Jackson (A.J.) Witherspoon, a former Confederate chaplain and founder of church, offered to his congregation of seamen the potential for Garfield’s death at “reuniting North and South, East and West”. His address surmised that Garfield’s goal as president could now be realized in his death  -–to bring peace to a post-civil war United States.

One impromptu river procession, The River’s Homage to The Dead President, recounts the gathering of tugboats adorned by black and white drapery, with whistles eerily echoing as they traveled from Morgan’s Ferry to Canal Street.

This volume is housed in the Special Collections and Archives of the Morgan Library.

There are full text scans available through Internet Archive and Google Books.