Wavelength!

This Wednesday we share some colorful covers from our collection of Wavelength, a New Orleans music magazine published from 1980-1991.

The entire run of Wavelength has been digitized by the University of New Orleans, and is available here.

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New Student Orientation Is Happening!

New Student Orientation is happening on campus right now, and that means freshman are going through some familiar experiences:

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Moving in

Hanging out in the dorm


Buying books–and detergent


Checking mail


Hopefully, NOT getting hazed


Orientation

And an old tradition–the handing out of the freshman beanies.

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You can view all these pictures and more in the Loyola University Photographs Collection on the Louisiana Digital Library.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Off-campus database access may be interrupted

All access to the library’s electronic products outside of the university’s campus may be temporarily interrupted as of the afternoon of Friday, May 16, 2017.  This includes all article databases, electronic journals and electronic books. We are working with the university’s Information Technology service to restore access as soon as possible.  Please continue to check your database or other service, as it may be restored even while the library is closed.  Not affected are the university’s email, Blackboard,  LORA and other electronic and web-based services. We deeply regret this interruption.

World Sea Turtle Day!

Today is World Sea Turtle Day! In celebration, we share some images from Special Collections & Archives’ copy of Louis Agassiz’s Contributions to the natural history of the United States of America Volume II Part III, “Embryology of the turtle.”

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above: 1,2 ASPIDONECTES SPINIFER A$ — 3 PLATYPELTIS FEROX FlCZ. — 4,5. ASPIDONECTES EMORY1 A$ ^ 6,7. AMYDA MUTICA FlU. 8,9 Chrysemys Bellii Gray — 10-12 Ozotheca odorata -—-13 32. Thalassochely.s Caduana Ficz

The image above includes one of the sea turtles native to the United States, the loggerhead sea turtle (no. 13-32), as well as several freshwater softshell turtles (no. 1-7), a painted turtle (no. 8-9), and a musk turtle (no. 10-12). Several illustrators worked with Agassiz on “Embryology of the turtle:” Jacques Burkhardt, Henry James Clark, and Auguste Sonrel.

While Agassiz’s legacy includes endorsement of the theory of polygenism, a form of scientific racism, in his early career he was a well recognized biologist and geologist. The four volumes of Contributions to the Natural History of the United States of America were published from 1857-1862 and detail the zoology of American turtles and jellyfish. The compendium was meant to eventually include ten volumes but was never finished.

Below are more images from “Embryology of the turtle” of both freshwater turtles and their eggs and embryos.

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Additional images from Contributions to the natural history of the United States of America can be found in the fully digitized volumes in HathiTrust and in a digital exhibit from the Gould Library at Carleton College, or come view the volume in person in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of the library.

Happy day, world sea turtles! Do you like turtles?

Letters from Iceland

It’s summer–what are your vacation plans? Perhaps a trip to chilly Iceland? For travel tips, look no further than W.H. Auden’s Letters From Iceland, previously detailed on the blog here.

Bon voyage!

Djuna Barnes in the Giroux Collection

Djuna Barnes, 1905. Public domain photo from Wikimedia Commons.

Today marks the 125th anniversary of the birth of Djuna Barnes, a writer and artist whose novel Nightwood is considered one of the earliest prominent American novels to portray lesbian relationships.

Djuna Barnes' The Antiphon, Nightwood, and Ryder from the Robert Giroux Book Collection

The Robert Giroux Book Collection in Special Collections & Archives contains several novels by Barnes.

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Search the library’s collections for more info on Barnes, or come to the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Special Collections & Archives Tuesday-Thursday, 9-12 or 1-4:30, to view the books pictured above.

Nexus Press Collection

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One of the pioneer artist’s book and fine press publishers in the South was Nexus Press, which was born out of an artists’ co-op in Atlanta, GA in 1976. Nexus Press was known for collaboration – artists from around the world were often invited to participate in residencies resulting in a small editions of artist’s books. The books were usually offset-printed, which lent itself to Nexus Press’ bold and spontaneous style. Although the organization shut down its presses in 2006, Nexus Press books continue to be prized by libraries collecting artists’ books. We are lucky to hold a few titles from this esteemed press; you can view more photos and information about some of these books here and here or come to the Booth-Bricker Reading Room on the third floor of the library to see the Nexus Press collection in person!

Special Collections Summer Hours

Summer is here, and Special Collections & Archives will have new hours.

Monday: By appointment only

Tuesday: 9:00-12:00; 1:00 -4:30

Tuesday: 9:00-12:00; 1:00 -4:30

Tuesday: 9:00-12:00; 1:00 -4:30

Friday: By appointment only

Wolf, The  [Yearbook]

Photo from 1967 Wolf available here.

Summer School – 1977!

As our students begin summer school this week, we take a look back to summer school…40 years ago.

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The summer of 1977 offered a plethora of classes to Loyola Students, as well as a robust offering of classes for the community in the City College division. Take a look at the Summer Bulletin here and enjoy these photos of campus from 1977.

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And make sure to check out Loyola’s campus in 1977!

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“Letters Read” performance series debuts in New Orleans

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Loyola University Special Collections is proud to have provided research materials for a new performance series in New Orleans, Letters Read , which made its debut last night at a local independent book store, Crescent City Books. This series features local actors reading from “historically important personal letters vital to the culture of New Orleans.” Letters Read is the brainchild of a nationally-renowned expert in stationery engraving and New Orleans resident, Nancy Sharon Collins, and is sponsored by local arts organization, Antenna. Nancy, who occasionally teaches classes in letter-writing and stationery history was pleased to discover our Lafcadio Hearn Correspondence Collection, which may be viewed in its digitized form here. Below is an excerpt from Nancy’s introduction to last night’s performance:

…The letters read tonight are by Patrick Lafcadio Hearn, written during his 1886 summer on Grand Isle, Louisiana to mentor and editor Page Baker…Hearn was a writer, journalist, wanderer and urbane observer and commentator of human civilization. He moved to New Orleans the year Reconstruction ended and lived here for a decade. Hearn is credited with putting New Orleans on the map as a cultural destination. As with many, he loved our fair city.

The Grand Isle letters provide an unedited glimpse into a small, highly personal corner of Hearn’s New Orleans experience, composed of language and thoughts that may offend.

Hearn’s Grand Isle letters were chosen for the first Letters Read event because of their content. By bringing Hearn’s inner-most thoughts to a wider audience we can, perhaps, understand what brings a man to express feelings of this kind…

-Nancy Sharon Collins

The reading of the letters was preceded by a brief talk by social psychologist, Dr. Adrienne McFaul, who encouraged the audience to consider what it means to dehumanize another human being. Because of the anti-Semitic language in some of Hearn’s letters, contextualization and critical thinking were key to this innovative performance concept, which gives striking insight into the letters’ author and illustrates the complexities and contradictions of human thought processes and prejudices.

We at Loyola SC&A look forward to future iterations of this series and congratulate Nancy on the debut of Letters Read! You can find Nancy’s book, The Complete Engraver, here.