Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats

"This book is respectfully dedicated to those friends who have assisted its composition by their encouragement, criticism and suggestions: and in particular to Mr. T.E. Faber, Miss Alison Tandy, Miss Susan Wolcott, Miss Susanna Morley, and the Man in White Spats.

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats dedication

Today is Respect Your Cat Day (yes, apparently that is a thing). In celebration, enjoy this 1939 first edition of T. S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats from the Robert Giroux Book Collection of 20th century American writers.

Eliot_cover

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats cover

Of course, many people best know this work for Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical adaptation, Cats.

The Trailer for CATS – Released in 1998! | Cats the Musical

This book and many more Eliot resources are available for research in the Booth-Bricker Reading Room in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives M-F 9-4:30.

Eliot_back-cover

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats back cover

Open Education Week 2017

Open Education Week celebrates the movement to create, share and use freely-available educational resources and tools among students, teachers and administrators.  Open educational materials (OEMs) can be freely obtained, edited or altered, and redistributed.  The week runs March 27 through 31, 2017.  Here at Loyola we support creation, distribution and use of OEMs, such as open textbooks, classroom presentations, videos, notes, question and quiz pools and more.  If you’ve read this far, then your awareness has been raised–goal achieved!  To learn more, contact us.

Hashtag: #openeducationwk

Flashback Friday!

Celebrate Flashback Friday with a little retro photo fun from our University Photographs Collection!

Title UP009593

Creator
Cresson, Russell G.

Contributors
Loyola University (New Orleans, La.)

Subject
Women
Loyola University (New Orleans, La.)
Blue Key Talent Night
Students

Description
Women perform on stilts

dancing stilts

COLLECTION SPOTLIGHT: Loyola University Publications

People often ask me, “What does an Archivist do?”

If they have never heard of archives before I explain that it is similar to what a librarian does except that the materials do not circulate (though if digitized they may be online). If they have heard of archives/archivists, I’ll explain what duties I have specific to the archives profession within the Special Collections & Archives in the Monroe Library at Loyola University New Orleans.

The university environment means that a good portion of what I do is to provide reference services for collections that were produced by the university to the university community. By no means do we have a complete record of the university and its students, faculty, and alumni, but we do have a lot of useful material that illustrates the history of the university.

Below you will find some of our digitized University Publications. These publications are useful ready-reference resources for looking up information about classes, programs, alumni and staff/faculty.

College Bulletins:

Contain information about each school or college. Beginning about 1969 the bulletins contain information only about undergraduate schools or colleges. Collection covers the years 1855-1924. Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable.

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The Maroon:

This is the Loyola University student-produced newspaper that is Digitized/downloadable and full-text searchable. This is a fantastic resource to search alumni, faculty, news, sports, events, and happenings of the Loyola community. Often the first place I look when researching alumni. Collection covers the years 1923 – present.

Maroon

The Wolf:

This is the university’s yearbook. Published (for the most part) annually from 1924 through 2007, this is the go-to place for finding basic information on alumni. Digitized/downloadable and available on the Internet Archive, this is full-text searchable (just make sure to search inside the volume not the entire site – a common mistake).

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These publications are only a few of the many that we have here in SCA, so please feel free to contact us with any of your University Archives questions M-F from 9-4:30.

American Chocolate Week: Walter Baker and Co.

Seeing as it is American Chocolate Week, we here at the Loyola University New Orleans Special Collections & Archives are offering a glimpse into the history and uses of chocolate as explained by the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States, Walter Baker & Co.

Founded in 1780, in Dorchester Massachusetts, Walter Baker & Co. chocolate was sold with a money back guarantee and famously known for its trademark adaptation of the Jean-Étienne Liotard painting, The La Belle Chocolatiere, (The Chocolate Girl).

–Liotard’s original painting, above.–

–An early Walter Baker’s & Co. advertisement featuring the La Belle Chocolatiere trademark.–

–Women dressed in the style of “The Chocolate Girl” as demonstrators for how to make cocoa.–

Cocoa and chocolate; a short history of their production and use, written by James M. Bugbee and published by Baker  in a revised edition in 1917, starts with an introduction to the cacao tree and it’s fruit

–Early depiction of cacao (cocoa) production in Mesoamerica.–

–The cacao plant.–

And follows with the methods of how it is cultivated.

And the processing of these pods into chocolate:

Followed by supporting science persuading the reader that chocolate is “a perfect food” and “the most harmless of our fashionable drinks”.

And I would think most of Library Lagniappe readers would agree that chocolate is pretty perfect.

The book has been digitized and can be viewed online through the Louisiana Digital Library at this link.

And here is a chocolate themed musical lagniappe for you from The Undertones:

Irish Illuminated Manuscripts

To celebrate St. Patrick’s day, we are enjoying Special Collections & Archives’ copies of National Manuscripts of Ireland (DA905 .J27). Printed in four oversize volumes in 1874-1884, the books include beautiful reproductions of Irish illuminated manuscripts created by Sir Henry James using his photozincography process.

Enjoy! And come see the books for yourself in Special Collections & Archives.

Visiting Japanese Archivists

Special Collections & Archives recently hosted visiting archivists from Japan. (From L to R: Dr. Takahiro Sakaguchi, Ms. Izumi Hirano, Special Collections and Archives Coordinator Trish Nugent, and Dr. Yuko Matsuzaki.)

The group, now back home in Tokyo, was touring archival repositories across the United States to learn more about American archival practices and policies. We were very honored by their visit and their interest in our collections!

A Class about the Bullet Journal System

The phenomenon of BuJo has come to Loyola, and Monroe Library is here to teach you all about it. BuJo stands for Bullet Journal, a way to organize via paper and pen. But it’s much more than organization: it’s a way to plan for the future, keep track of what you’ve done, and get creative. Using a specialized bullet system as its base, the bullet journal helps keep everything together and on track. And it is highly customizable!

Come find out why BuJo is a buzz-worthy word in the Library Living Room from 5pm-6pm on the First Day of Spring, March 20.

The first ten people to register get a free starter Bullet Journal! Supplies like colorful pens, rulers, and practice paper will be provided for everyone.

Hosted by Emily Bufford, Learning Commons Coordinator. Email Emily at EDBuffor@loyno.edu to register.

What Fake News Is…and What It Isn’t

Was Nino Rubbed Out? I Read it at CVS!

Photo by Mike Licht

Well before Google and Facebook became common household words, there were already many different incarnations of what we’ve started calling “fake news.” Supermarket tabloids heralding dubious evidence for the existence of UFOs or the latest celebrity scandals are among fake news’ closest ancestors. The famous 1938 broadcast of director Orson Welles’ radio drama, War of the Worlds, fooled audiences into thinking Martians had invaded Earth. Tellingly, Welles revealed that the production company was motivated, in part, by a desire to teach the public about the dangers of uncritical acceptance of news on the new technology of radio (Schwartz). Indeed, as early as 1475, false reports of Jews abducting and drinking the blood of children have been used to agitate a credulous public against a common scapegoat (Soll).

More recently, several prominent contemporary journalists have been disciplined for lapses in journalistic integrity that include exaggerating for dramatic effect (NBC’s Brian Williams), giving undue credence to their informants (The New York Times’ Judith Miller), and outright fabrication (The New York Times’ Jayson Blair). These eyebrow-raising lapses by journalists working for highly reputable news outlets all defy a clear code of ethics for journalists.

Other variants in the “not quite news” category include segments on late night comedy shows such as The Daily Show or even Saturday Night Live. They may mention events documented by journalists following established procedures for verification of facts, but they clearly present themselves as humor, not journalism. We might also include in this category the nightly pundit shows that satisfy the 24-hour news cycle’s voracious appetite for content. Like late night comedy shows, pundits add commentary but can’t be properly described as producing reporting that meets journalistic standards.

Advertising also plays an important role in determining the content of our media whether we’re talking about print, television, or digital. Fake news’ defining characteristic is that its authors willingly report falsehoods to garner clicks on a story’s link. All this works in the interest of making money from web content through online advertising services such as Google’s AdSense. To add to the confusion, fake news websites may even have misleading URLs that mimic popular media sites like USAToday.com.co or WashingtonPost.com.co. Furthermore, the global nature of digital communication means that this is a problem both in the U.S. and internationally.

So what ISN’T fake news? When a major news organization reports on news that we don’t like or that is eventually proven incorrect, that does not qualify as “fake news” if it was based on credible sources. Similarly, if a news organization reports on a public leader who says something false, that is not fake news if the public leader actually said it. Major news organizations like CNN reported prior to the 2016 election that Hillary Clinton would win in a landslide. Were they reporting fake news? No, they were reporting the results of national polls — and polls can be wrong.

News media has its own bias as well. This infographic attempts to show the liberal and conservative leanings of many major news organizations, but we may also consider whether the infographic itself might also be biased. What do you think?

To help us get better at spotting fake news, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions has created a handy infographic that recommends several ways to evaluate the news we hear and see. In addition, non-partisan fact-checking websites like Snopes, Politifact, and FactCheck.org easily debunk hoaxes while also providing context on how a hoax or “fake news” report began. Finally, the Monroe Library is also here to help you sift through an increasingly unnavigable and often misleading media landscape. For more info, see our research guides on Fake News and Evaluating Web Pages, or contact your library liaison for help.

IFLA infographic based on FactCheck.org’s 2016 article “How to Spot Fake News” in PDF format

Clamshell Boxmaking

via GIPHY

Checkout our Special Collections & Archives Tumblr post to view a brief photo documentary of the clamshell box constructed for a large oversized leather volume, Door Locks, Knobs, Padlocks, etc. Hooray for box-making and book preservation!