Faculty Search Announcement: Instruction and Research Coordinator

To apply: Email letter of application, resume, and 3-5 references with contact information to:
Deborah Poole, Dean of Libraries

Submissions must be submitted in pdf or MS Word format.
Application deadline is May 16, 2016.
Loyola University’s Monroe Library is located in beautiful uptown New Orleans, facing Audubon Park and the historic streetcar line. Loyola University is a Catholic institution that emphasizes the Jesuit tradition of educating the whole person.  The Monroe Library has been consistently ranked as one of the Best College Libraries by Princeton Review. Loyola University offers a generous vacation and competitive benefits package for full-time employees.
Loyola University is an AA/EOE employer.

Loyola University New Orleans
Job Description: Instruction and Research Coordinator
J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library

Title of Position: Instruction and Research Coordinator

College: University Library                               Date Written: 2011, revised 2016

I.       SUMMARY OF POSITION

This a full-time 12-month, tenure-track member faculty position. The Instruction and Research Coordinator leads the library’s instruction program and the strategic planning and assessment of information literacy learning outcomes; develops and offers research and technology instruction to the Loyola community; promotes the integration of information literacy throughout the curricula; coordinates the Teaching and Learning Team, including the library’s liaison program.

II.      ORGANIZATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Responsible to: Dean of Libraries

Assignments received from: Dean of Libraries and library teams

Interacts with: Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community; library teams and university committees; university departments and offices; colleagues and professionals in the field

Nature of Supervision: Meets regularly with the Dean of Libraries

Nature of supervision given and individual(s) or groups supervised: Supervises, mentors, and trains library faculty, staff, and student employees as needed

III.    DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

A.          Essential Functions

1.   Leads strategic planning and assessment of the library’s instruction program.

Provides vision and sets priorities for the Teaching and Learning Team to align with the Library’s and the University’s strategic goals. Works with Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum to develop information literacy learning goals and assess outcomes in the Loyola Core.

2.   Coordinates and provides information literacy and technology instruction.

Promotes efforts to integrate information literacy into assignments, courses, and throughout curricula. Collaborates with Media Services, Learning Commons, Special Collections & Archives, and Online Learning Team regarding instruction. Maintains the library instruction teaching schedule and classroom reservations.

3.   Leads the Library’s active liaison program to partner with teaching faculty on information literacy, research support, collection development, and the use of information resources. Facilitates collaboration between the Teaching and Learning Team and the Information Resources Team.

4.   Develops a community of practice among the library instructors. Creates internal and external opportunities for professional development regarding instruction.

5.   Provides, coordinates and assesses reference and research services, including the AJCU chat service.

6.   Participates in local, regional, and national library instruction communities.

Keeps current with trends and fosters awareness of new developments in research, instruction, scholarship and technology trends in order to integrate them into the library’s practice and planning.

7.   Serves as a liaison to designated academic departments and centers on campus. Serves as liaison to the Honors program. Engages in collection development that supports teaching and learning in liaison departments.

8.   Serves on library and university teams and committees. Serves as the library’s representative on the Standing Committee on the Common Curriculum.

9.   Engages with area high schools  and community partners to promote information literacy, lifelong learning, and academic libraries.

10. Fulfills expectations for promotion and tenure, including scholarship.

B. Additional Responsibilities

1.   Participates in professional development to enhance skills and knowledge; attends professional meetings and conferences.

2.   Identifies grant opportunities and works collaboratively to create proposals in support of library instruction.

IV.       QUALIFICATIONS

A.  Required Education, Experience, Skills and Abilities

1.   Master of Library Science or equivalent degree from an American Library Association accredited school.

2.   Minimum of two (2) years experience in an academic library related to instruction, reference, and liaison services.

3.   Teaching experience, including information literacy, technology instruction, or instructional design. Knowledge of the concepts articulated in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Demonstrated knowledge of student learning outcomes assessment.

4.   Demonstrated leadership skills and experience in planning, implementing and assessing library initiatives.

5.   Experience supervising and mentoring.

6.   Excellent interpersonal skills, including the ability to foster a diverse and collegial work environment that encourages innovation.

7.   Demonstrated skills and experience in collaborating within and outside the library to develop and deliver quality service.

8.   Ability to balance varied responsibilities; demonstrated ability to work in an active learning environment and juggle multiple tasks.

9.   Ability to develop and create online tutorials, guides, and other learning objects.

10. Potential to meet the requirements for promotion and tenure, including evidence of contributions to the scholarship of librarianship or teaching and learning.

B.        Additional Desirable Qualifications

1.   Familiarity with information literacy assessment tools.

2.   Experience developing tutorials, research guides, and other learning objects.

3.   Experience with teaching online.

4.   Experience with Blackboard or other course management software.

5.   Additional advanced degree.

Happy 100th Birthday, Walker Percy!

C10_percy_final

Walker Percy receiving the Campion Award from the Catholic Book Club at Loyola in 1986. L-R: Fr. Thomas Clancy, S.J.; Walker Percy; Fr. Patrick Samway, S.J., Percy's biographer. Archives.

Saturday, May 28th, would have been the 100th birthday of author Walker Percy. Percy was born on May 28, 1916 in Birmingham, Alabama, and achieved fame as the National Book Award for Fiction winner with his novel The Moviegoer. Walker Percy was raised agnostic/Protestant but later converted to Catholicism and wrote extensively about spirituality. He was a longtime Covington, LA resident and taught writing at Loyola, worked on the New Orleans Review, and was instrumental in getting John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces published in 1980, eleven years after Toole’s death.

Maroon, 1976-09-17, Page 4

Special Collections & Archives houses many materials related to Percy, including a large catalog of books (with many first editions and autographed copies, most donated by Percy’s biographer Patrick Samway, S.J.), and several archival collections of correspondence.

Percy_MovieGoer

Autographed title page to 1st edition of The Moviegoer, reads "To Patrick Samway, S.J., with thanks & gratitude. Walker Percy, Baton Rouge, La., October 9, 1985."

Percy died in 1990, but his influence as a writer, editor, and educator continues to be felt both in Special Collections & Archives and at the Walker Percy Center for Writing & Publishing.

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

History of the Fan

Today Found in the Archives takes a look at The History of the Fan.

This large and lavishly illustrated volume was assembled by G. Wolliscroft Rhead, and published in a limited edition of 450 in 1910.

Inspired by the fact that despite the fan’s ubiquity, “[e]ven on the continent the literature of the Fan is exceedingly scanty,” Rhead traces, in minute detail, the fan from ancient times…

…through the eighteenth century.

The volume features many beautiful examples:

As well as helpful instruction on the language of the fan:

Come see The History of the Fan for yourself in Special Collections & Archives!

Louisiana Out-Of-Doors: A Handbook and Guide

Louisiana Out-of-Doors is an illustrated handbook of Louisiana natural history and outdoor recreation published in 1933.

Louisiana Out-Of-Doors

Fully indexed, it outlines all sorts of information and statistics including the geology of the state, outdoor activities, and locations listed with addresses, photos are scattered throughout (it even has a guide to poisonous snakes and snakebite treatments).

Map of Louisiana

Physiographic Map Of Louisiana

This handbook comes with a separate foldout map that has points of interest numbered for easy reference.

Features of Interest Map

One activity that is highlighted is fishing or angling, one of Louisiana’s favorite pastimes. Of course, crawfish (Crayfish) are of special interests, but fishing, in general, is also explored.

The Creole Crayfish Net

Louisiana Swamp Crayfish

Four Jacks

This is a great book to utilize when searching for recreational activities today as well as a great resource for researching the history of recreation and outdoors adventure in mid-twentieth century Louisiana.

Come check out this and other Louisiana naturalist books Monday-Friday in the Special Collections & Archives on the 3rd floor of the Monroe Library.

And here us a little something extra, Dough Kershaw doing Louisiana Man:

New (old) graduation photos

Special Collections & Archives has just added another ~2000 images from to the digitized Loyola University New Orleans University Photographs Collection. Fortuitously, many of the new batch of photos are of commencement ceremonies from Loyola’s past. Enjoy this look through over 60 years of graduation activities.

1938 graduates

Female graduates circa 1940-1950

Commencement in the Academic Quad, 1950

1952 commencement speaker Irish Ambassador John J. Hearne with Loyola President Fr. Shields

1964 Inter-American Center Graduation

1973 commencement procession through the Horseshoe

1974 Honorary Degree recipient actress Cicely Tyson with Archbishop Hannan

1980 Law School graduates

1980 Commencement at the Municipal Auditorium

1981 Honors students with President Fr. Carter

1981 graduates

1981 Law School graduates

Landrieu family at 1985 Law School commencement with graduate Mitch

1987 Honorary Degree recipients Fr. Ernest J. Burrus, E. John Bullard, and Tom Benson with Archbishop Hannan.

Finally, here’s a bonus photo of 2016 Commencement Speaker Harry Connick Jr. in the 1986 Wolf Yearbook:

See more images of Honorary Degree recipients and graduation activities in the Loyola University New Orleans University Photographs Collection, and drop us a line at archives@loyno.edu if you see someone you know!

#howtotuesday: Prevent Yellow Fever

#howtotuesday: Prevent Yellow Fever

Above: sanitary map of the city of New Orleans

Yellow Fever, sometimes called Yellow Jack or Yellow Plague, is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of female mosquitoes of the Aedes aegypti species. Most cases of Yellow Fever cause mild symptoms including fever, headache, and chills; however, approximately 15% of cases develop into toxic, severe stages of recurring fever, jaundice (yellowing of the skin) due to liver damage, abdominal pain, vomiting, and internal bleeding.

The city of New Orleans was plagued by several epidemics of Yellow Fever during the 19th century, the most deadly in 1853. Sadly, in a single year, 7,849 residents of New Orleans (population: 154,000) succumbed to the illness.

The Yellow Fever epidemic of 1853 led to further study of the viral disease and publication of The Cause and Prevention of Yellow Fever at New Orleans and Other Cities in America, a text investigating “the origin and mode of transmission of the great epidemic of last year, together with all causes affecting the salubrity of the city.”

The publication includes eight foldouts, each employing a map or chart to illustrate data.

Above: chart exhibiting the annual mortality of New Orleans

Local researchers conducted many experiments in an attempt to control the epidemic, including but not limited to, purifying the air by burning tar and firing canons throughout the city (a method only employed once). After identifying mosquitoes as the transmitters of Yellow Fever, efforts were launched to control the breeding of insects, particularly through extensive sanitation–an endeavor largely responsible for ending the crisis.

Interested in learning more about the Yellow Fever epidemic of 1853? Visit us in Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives Monday-Thursday, 9:00-4:30 or Friday, 9:00-12:00 where The Cause and Prevention of Yellow Fever at New Orleans and Other Cities in America and additional texts (like this one) are available for viewing!

I hope each of you have a wonderful holiday weekend (and don’t forget to wear a bit of bug spray)!

Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy National Limerick Day!

National Limerick Day is observed annually on May 12, the birthday of Edward Lear (1812-1888). Lear is best known for his nonsensical poetry, prose, and limericks.

In celebration, we invite you to enjoy a sampling of Edward Lear’s whimsical poetry and accompanying illustrations as they appear in The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Collection Spotlight: Ecology Center of Louisiana, Inc., Papers

The Ecology Center of Louisiana, a private, non-profit organization headquartered in New Orleans, collected and disseminated information on Louisiana’s environmental problems and emphasized public participation in resolution of those problems. The Ecology Center, most active between 1970 and 1983, was founded in 1969 around a kitchen table by a group of environmentally conscious citizens. Among them was J. Ross Vincent, a research chemical engineer from Wilmington, Delaware, who would go on to lead the Center for more than a decade.

Center services included a monthly newsletter, lectures and panel discussions on environmental subjects, assistance to schools and teachers in the development of environmental curricula, Louisiana’s first recycling program, an environmental library and hot-line, radio and television programs and lobbying of city, state and federal government representatives. Over time, the Ecology Center became an established resource called upon for expertise and guidance by environmentalists, politicians, business people, students and interested citizens.

Run by a board of directors made up of community members, the Ecology Center was assisted by a professional and volunteer staff and a Board of Advisors, which included the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, two U.S. Congressmen, an Assistant State Attorney General and various other government officials. During one of its busiest periods in early 1971, there were 146 people associated with the Ecology Center, including 131 paying members and 101 active volunteers. To fund its activities, the Center depended almost entirely on the support of its members and on private contributions from concerned citizens and businesses.

Issues and events on which the Center had an impact include limiting the use of the fire ant pesticide Mirex, the first Earth Day celebration in Louisiana, the implementation of the Federal Clean Air Act in Louisiana, public awareness of issues for the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, environmentally conscious urban planning, air pollution, construction of a deep draft oil terminal off of the Louisiana coast, the Waterford Nuclear Power Plant in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, public parks, water and air quality management, and regional transportation planning.

Scope and Content

The arrangement of the Ecology Center of Louisiana papers is largely based on the inventory of creator, J. Ross Vincent. However, a portion of the original subject files was integrated in the interest of cohesiveness. Papers document the activities of the Ecology Center through founding records, correspondence, articles and newsletters on environmental issues from its founding in 1969 until 1987 when J. Ross Vincent, the Center’s president and co-founder moved out of state. The predominant topics of conversation involve environmental issues affecting the state of Louisiana, the support for or opposition to environmental legislation and litigation, and the seeking or dispensing of environmental information.

Papers demonstrate that the Ecology Center was able to establish credibility with government agencies, the business community, organizations of concerned citizens and the public regarding environmental issues that directly affected the state of Louisiana and its inhabitants.

Other than general administrative papers and correspondence, papers are predominately divided by environmental subjects, including Air Pollution, Chemicals, Water Pollution and Coastal Zone Management, Land Use, Transportation, Solid Waste, Energy, Law and Litigation and Organizations, Conferences and Newsletters. Within each of the subjects, there is additional correspondence between the Ecology Center and concerned citizens, environmentalists and politicians. The collection includes information on a broad range of important environmental issues, as well as evidence of efforts by the Ecology Center and the impact of the Center to effect some change for the betterment of the environment.

Finally, the collection includes publications collected by and related to the organization.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

Happy Birthday, J.M. Barrie!

J.M. Barrie, best known as the author and creator of Peter Pan, was born on this day in 1860. Pictured is our 1st edition copy of Barrie’s lesser known 1891 work The Little Minister.

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Special Collections and Archives, located on the third floor of Monroe Library, is open for research and quiet study Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30.

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Found in the Archives is a recurring series of crazy cool stuff found in the Monroe Library’s Special Collections & Archives.

#minibookmonday

Today’s mini book is Historia de la Florida by Inca Garcilaso de la Vega.

Only 13cm tall, this little three volume edition was published in 1803 in Madrid. Originally published in 1604, Historia de la Florida tells the story of Hernando De Soto’s exploration of Florida in the 16th century.